Models, code, and papers for "Jiyu Chen":

Less is More: Culling the Training Set to Improve Robustness of Deep Neural Networks

Jan 09, 2018
Yongshuai Liu, Jiyu Chen, Hao Chen

Deep neural networks are vulnerable to adversarial examples. Prior defenses attempted to make deep networks more robust by either improving the network architecture or adding adversarial examples into the training set, with their respective limitations. We propose a new direction. Motivated by recent research that shows that outliers in the training set have a high negative influence on the trained model, our approach makes the model more robust by detecting and removing outliers in the training set without modifying the network architecture or requiring adversarial examples. We propose two methods for detecting outliers based on canonical examples and on training errors, respectively. After removing the outliers, we train the classifier with the remaining examples to obtain a sanitized model. Our evaluation shows that the sanitized model improves classification accuracy and forces the attacks to generate adversarial examples with higher distortions. Moreover, the Kullback-Leibler divergence from the output of the original model to that of the sanitized model allows us to distinguish between normal and adversarial examples reliably.


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A bag-of-concepts model improves relation extraction in a narrow knowledge domain with limited data

Apr 24, 2019
Jiyu Chen, Karin Verspoor, Zenan Zhai

This paper focuses on a traditional relation extraction task in the context of limited annotated data and a narrow knowledge domain. We explore this task with a clinical corpus consisting of 200 breast cancer follow-up treatment letters in which 16 distinct types of relations are annotated. We experiment with an approach to extracting typed relations called window-bounded co-occurrence (WBC), which uses an adjustable context window around entity mentions of a relevant type, and compare its performance with a more typical intra-sentential co-occurrence baseline. We further introduce a new bag-of-concepts (BoC) approach to feature engineering based on the state-of-the-art word embeddings and word synonyms. We demonstrate the competitiveness of BoC by comparing with methods of higher complexity, and explore its effectiveness on this small dataset.

* In Proceedings of the Student Research Workshop at North American Association for Computational Linguistics (NAACL) 2019 
* To appear in Proceedings of the Student Research Workshop at the North American Association for Computational Linguistics (NAACL) meeting 2019 

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ASP Vision: Optically Computing the First Layer of Convolutional Neural Networks using Angle Sensitive Pixels

Nov 16, 2016
Huaijin Chen, Suren Jayasuriya, Jiyue Yang, Judy Stephen, Sriram Sivaramakrishnan, Ashok Veeraraghavan, Alyosha Molnar

Deep learning using convolutional neural networks (CNNs) is quickly becoming the state-of-the-art for challenging computer vision applications. However, deep learning's power consumption and bandwidth requirements currently limit its application in embedded and mobile systems with tight energy budgets. In this paper, we explore the energy savings of optically computing the first layer of CNNs. To do so, we utilize bio-inspired Angle Sensitive Pixels (ASPs), custom CMOS diffractive image sensors which act similar to Gabor filter banks in the V1 layer of the human visual cortex. ASPs replace both image sensing and the first layer of a conventional CNN by directly performing optical edge filtering, saving sensing energy, data bandwidth, and CNN FLOPS to compute. Our experimental results (both on synthetic data and a hardware prototype) for a variety of vision tasks such as digit recognition, object recognition, and face identification demonstrate using ASPs while achieving similar performance compared to traditional deep learning pipelines.

* Presented in CVPR 2016 (oral), 10 pages, 12 figures. This new version corrects the comparison between imaging power for ASPs and a regular image sensor 

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ViP: Virtual Pooling for Accelerating CNN-based Image Classification and Object Detection

Jun 19, 2019
Zhuo Chen, Jiyuan Zhang, Ruizhou Ding, Diana Marculescu

In recent years, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have shown superior capability in visual learning tasks. While accuracy-wise CNNs provide unprecedented performance, they are also known to be computationally intensive and energy demanding for modern computer systems. In this paper, we propose Virtual Pooling (ViP), a model-level approach to improve speed and energy consumption of CNN-based image classification and object detection tasks, with a provable error bound. We show the efficacy of ViP through experiments on four CNN models, three representative datasets, both desktop and mobile platforms, and two visual learning tasks, i.e., image classification and object detection. For example, ViP delivers 2.1x speedup with less than 1.5% accuracy degradation in ImageNet classification on VGG-16, and 1.8x speedup with 0.025 mAP degradation in PASCAL VOC object detection with Faster-RCNN. ViP also reduces mobile GPU and CPU energy consumption by up to 55% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, ViP provides a knob for machine learning practitioners to generate a set of CNN models with varying trade-offs between system speed/energy consumption and accuracy to better accommodate the requirements of their tasks. Code is publicly available.


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DeepGauge: Multi-Granularity Testing Criteria for Deep Learning Systems

Aug 14, 2018
Lei Ma, Felix Juefei-Xu, Fuyuan Zhang, Jiyuan Sun, Minhui Xue, Bo Li, Chunyang Chen, Ting Su, Li Li, Yang Liu, Jianjun Zhao, Yadong Wang

Deep learning (DL) defines a new data-driven programming paradigm that constructs the internal system logic of a crafted neuron network through a set of training data. We have seen wide adoption of DL in many safety-critical scenarios. However, a plethora of studies have shown that the state-of-the-art DL systems suffer from various vulnerabilities which can lead to severe consequences when applied to real-world applications. Currently, the testing adequacy of a DL system is usually measured by the accuracy of test data. Considering the limitation of accessible high quality test data, good accuracy performance on test data can hardly provide confidence to the testing adequacy and generality of DL systems. Unlike traditional software systems that have clear and controllable logic and functionality, the lack of interpretability in a DL system makes system analysis and defect detection difficult, which could potentially hinder its real-world deployment. In this paper, we propose DeepGauge, a set of multi-granularity testing criteria for DL systems, which aims at rendering a multi-faceted portrayal of the testbed. The in-depth evaluation of our proposed testing criteria is demonstrated on two well-known datasets, five DL systems, and with four state-of-the-art adversarial attack techniques against DL. The potential usefulness of DeepGauge sheds light on the construction of more generic and robust DL systems.

* DeepGauge: Multi-Granularity Testing Criteria for Deep Learning Systems. In Proceedings of the 33rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE 18), September 3-7, 2018, Montpellier, France 
* The 33rd IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE 2018) 

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