Models, code, and papers for "Stephan Hoyer":

Neural reparameterization improves structural optimization

Sep 14, 2019
Stephan Hoyer, Jascha Sohl-Dickstein, Sam Greydanus

Structural optimization is a popular method for designing objects such as bridge trusses, airplane wings, and optical devices. Unfortunately, the quality of solutions depends heavily on how the problem is parameterized. In this paper, we propose using the implicit bias over functions induced by neural networks to improve the parameterization of structural optimization. Rather than directly optimizing densities on a grid, we instead optimize the parameters of a neural network which outputs those densities. This reparameterization leads to different and often better solutions. On a selection of 116 structural optimization tasks, our approach produces the best design 50% more often than the best baseline method.


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Correcting Nuisance Variation using Wasserstein Distance

Nov 02, 2017
Gil Tabak, Minjie Fan, Samuel J. Yang, Stephan Hoyer, Geoff Davis

Profiling cellular phenotypes from microscopic imaging can provide meaningful biological information resulting from various factors affecting the cells. One motivating application is drug development: morphological cell features can be captured from images, from which similarities between different drugs applied at different dosages can be quantified. The general approach is to find a function mapping the images to an embedding space of manageable dimensionality whose geometry captures relevant features of the input images. An important known issue for such methods is separating relevant biological signal from nuisance variation. For example, the embedding vectors tend to be more correlated for cells that were cultured and imaged during the same week than for cells from a different week, despite having identical drug compounds applied in both cases. In this case, the particular batch a set of experiments were conducted in constitutes the domain of the data; an ideal set of image embeddings should contain only the relevant biological information (e.g. drug effects). We develop a method for adjusting the image embeddings in order to `forget' domain-specific information while preserving relevant biological information. To do this, we minimize a loss function based on the Wasserstein distance. We find for our transformed embeddings (1) the underlying geometric structure is preserved and (2) less domain-specific information is present.

* 11 pages, 5 figures 

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Lagrangian Neural Networks

Mar 10, 2020
Miles Cranmer, Sam Greydanus, Stephan Hoyer, Peter Battaglia, David Spergel, Shirley Ho

Accurate models of the world are built upon notions of its underlying symmetries. In physics, these symmetries correspond to conservation laws, such as for energy and momentum. Yet even though neural network models see increasing use in the physical sciences, they struggle to learn these symmetries. In this paper, we propose Lagrangian Neural Networks (LNNs), which can parameterize arbitrary Lagrangians using neural networks. In contrast to models that learn Hamiltonians, LNNs do not require canonical coordinates, and thus perform well in situations where canonical momenta are unknown or difficult to compute. Unlike previous approaches, our method does not restrict the functional form of learned energies and will produce energy-conserving models for a variety of tasks. We test our approach on a double pendulum and a relativistic particle, demonstrating energy conservation where a baseline approach incurs dissipation and modeling relativity without canonical coordinates where a Hamiltonian approach fails. Finally, we show how this model can be applied to graphs and continuous systems using a Lagrangian Graph Network, and demonstrate it on the 1D wave equation.

* 7 pages (+2 appendix). Accepted to ICLR 2020 Deep Differential Equations Workshop. Code at github.com/MilesCranmer/lagrangian_nns 

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Data-driven metasurface discovery

Nov 29, 2018
Jiaqi Jiang, David Sell, Stephan Hoyer, Jason Hickey, Jianji Yang, Jonathan A. Fan

A long-standing challenge with metasurface design is identifying computationally efficient methods that produce high performance devices. Design methods based on iterative optimization push the performance limits of metasurfaces, but they require extensive computational resources that limit their implementation to small numbers of microscale devices. We show that generative neural networks can learn from a small set of topology-optimized metasurfaces to produce large numbers of high-efficiency, topologically-complex metasurfaces operating across a large parameter space. This approach enables considerable savings in computation cost compared to brute force optimization. As a model system, we employ conditional generative adversarial networks to design highly-efficient metagratings over a broad range of deflection angles and operating wavelengths. Generated device designs can be further locally optimized and serve as additional training data for network refinement. Our design concept utilizes a relatively small initial training set of just a few hundred devices, and it serves as a more general blueprint for the AI-based analysis of physical systems where access to large datasets is limited. We envision that such data-driven design tools can be broadly utilized in other domains of optics, acoustics, mechanics, and electronics.

* 14 pages, 5 figures 

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Inundation Modeling in Data Scarce Regions

Oct 30, 2019
Zvika Ben-Haim, Vladimir Anisimov, Aaron Yonas, Varun Gulshan, Yusef Shafi, Stephan Hoyer, Sella Nevo

Flood forecasts are crucial for effective individual and governmental protective action. The vast majority of flood-related casualties occur in developing countries, where providing spatially accurate forecasts is a challenge due to scarcity of data and lack of funding. This paper describes an operational system providing flood extent forecast maps covering several flood-prone regions in India, with the goal of being sufficiently scalable and cost-efficient to facilitate the establishment of effective flood forecasting systems globally.

* To appear in the Artificial Intelligence for Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response Workshop (AI+HADR) @ NeurIPS 2019 

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The Cramer Distance as a Solution to Biased Wasserstein Gradients

May 30, 2017
Marc G. Bellemare, Ivo Danihelka, Will Dabney, Shakir Mohamed, Balaji Lakshminarayanan, Stephan Hoyer, Rémi Munos

The Wasserstein probability metric has received much attention from the machine learning community. Unlike the Kullback-Leibler divergence, which strictly measures change in probability, the Wasserstein metric reflects the underlying geometry between outcomes. The value of being sensitive to this geometry has been demonstrated, among others, in ordinal regression and generative modelling. In this paper we describe three natural properties of probability divergences that reflect requirements from machine learning: sum invariance, scale sensitivity, and unbiased sample gradients. The Wasserstein metric possesses the first two properties but, unlike the Kullback-Leibler divergence, does not possess the third. We provide empirical evidence suggesting that this is a serious issue in practice. Leveraging insights from probabilistic forecasting we propose an alternative to the Wasserstein metric, the Cram\'er distance. We show that the Cram\'er distance possesses all three desired properties, combining the best of the Wasserstein and Kullback-Leibler divergences. To illustrate the relevance of the Cram\'er distance in practice we design a new algorithm, the Cram\'er Generative Adversarial Network (GAN), and show that it performs significantly better than the related Wasserstein GAN.


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