This essay discusses whether computers, using Artificial Intelligence (AI), could create art. First, the history of technologies that automated aspects of art is surveyed, including photography and animation. In each case, there were initial fears and denial of the technology, followed by a blossoming of new creative and professional opportunities for artists. The current hype and reality of Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools for art making is then discussed, together with predictions about how AI tools will be used. It is then speculated about whether it could ever happen that AI systems could be credited with authorship of artwork. It is theorized that art is something created by social agents, and so computers cannot be credited with authorship of art in our current understanding. A few ways that this could change are also hypothesized. Click to Read Paper
This note presents an extension to the neural artistic style transfer algorithm (Gatys et al.). The original algorithm transforms an image to have the style of another given image. For example, a photograph can be transformed to have the style of a famous painting. Here we address a potential shortcoming of the original method: the algorithm transfers the colors of the original painting, which can alter the appearance of the scene in undesirable ways. We describe simple linear methods for transferring style while preserving colors. Click to Read Paper
Infographics are complex graphic designs integrating text, images, charts and sketches. Despite the increasing popularity of infographics and the rapid growth of online design portfolios, little research investigates how we can take advantage of these design resources. In this paper we present a method for measuring the style similarity between infographics. Based on human perception data collected from crowdsourced experiments, we use computer vision and machine learning algorithms to learn a style similarity metric for infographic designs. We evaluate different visual features and learning algorithms and find that a combination of color histograms and Histograms-of-Gradients (HoG) features is most effective in characterizing the style of infographics. We demonstrate our similarity metric on a preliminary image retrieval test. Click to Read Paper
This paper proposes direct learning of image classification from user-supplied tags, without filtering. Each tag is supplied by the user who shared the image online. Enormous numbers of these tags are freely available online, and they give insight about the image categories important to users and to image classification. Our approach is complementary to the conventional approach of manual annotation, which is extremely costly. We analyze of the Flickr 100 Million Image dataset, making several useful observations about the statistics of these tags. We introduce a large-scale robust classification algorithm, in order to handle the inherent noise in these tags, and a calibration procedure to better predict objective annotations. We show that freely available, user-supplied tags can obtain similar or superior results to large databases of costly manual annotations. Click to Read Paper
We propose an efficient optimization algorithm for selecting a subset of training data to induce sparsity for Gaussian process regression. The algorithm estimates an inducing set and the hyperparameters using a single objective, either the marginal likelihood or a variational free energy. The space and time complexity are linear in training set size, and the algorithm can be applied to large regression problems on discrete or continuous domains. Empirical evaluation shows state-of-art performance in discrete cases and competitive results in the continuous case. Click to Read Paper
This paper introduces the problem of automatic font pairing. Font pairing is an important design task that is difficult for novices. Given a font selection for one part of a document (e.g., header), our goal is to recommend a font to be used in another part (e.g., body) such that the two fonts used together look visually pleasing. There are three main challenges in font pairing. First, this is a fine-grained problem, in which the subtle distinctions between fonts may be important. Second, rules and conventions of font pairing given by human experts are difficult to formalize. Third, font pairing is an asymmetric problem in that the roles played by header and body fonts are not interchangeable. To address these challenges, we propose automatic font pairing through learning visual relationships from large-scale human-generated font pairs. We introduce a new database for font pairing constructed from millions of PDF documents available on the Internet. We propose two font pairing algorithms: dual-space k-NN and asymmetric similarity metric learning (ASML). These two methods automatically learn fine-grained relationships from large-scale data. We also investigate several baseline methods based on the rules from professional designers. Experiments and user studies demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed dataset and methods. Click to Read Paper
We propose a fast feed-forward network for arbitrary style transfer, which can generate stylized image for previously unseen content and style image pairs. Besides the traditional content and style representation based on deep features and statistics for textures, we use adversarial networks to regularize the generation of stylized images. Our adversarial network learns the intrinsic property of image styles from large-scale multi-domain artistic images. The adversarial training is challenging because both the input and output of our generator are diverse multi-domain images. We use a conditional generator that stylized content by shifting the statistics of deep features, and a conditional discriminator based on the coarse category of styles. Moreover, we propose a mask module to spatially decide the stylization level and stabilize adversarial training by avoiding mode collapse. As a side effect, our trained discriminator can be applied to rank and select representative stylized images. We qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the proposed method, and compare with recent style transfer methods. Click to Read Paper
Neural Style Transfer has shown very exciting results enabling new forms of image manipulation. Here we extend the existing method to introduce control over spatial location, colour information and across spatial scale. We demonstrate how this enhances the method by allowing high-resolution controlled stylisation and helps to alleviate common failure cases such as applying ground textures to sky regions. Furthermore, by decomposing style into these perceptual factors we enable the combination of style information from multiple sources to generate new, perceptually appealing styles from existing ones. We also describe how these methods can be used to more efficiently produce large size, high-quality stylisation. Finally we show how the introduced control measures can be applied in recent methods for Fast Neural Style Transfer. Click to Read Paper
Computer vision systems are designed to work well within the context of everyday photography. However, artists often render the world around them in ways that do not resemble photographs. Artwork produced by people is not constrained to mimic the physical world, making it more challenging for machines to recognize. This work is a step toward teaching machines how to categorize images in ways that are valuable to humans. First, we collect a large-scale dataset of contemporary artwork from Behance, a website containing millions of portfolios from professional and commercial artists. We annotate Behance imagery with rich attribute labels for content, emotions, and artistic media. Furthermore, we carry out baseline experiments to show the value of this dataset for artistic style prediction, for improving the generality of existing object classifiers, and for the study of visual domain adaptation. We believe our Behance Artistic Media dataset will be a good starting point for researchers wishing to study artistic imagery and relevant problems. Click to Read Paper
The style of an image plays a significant role in how it is viewed, but style has received little attention in computer vision research. We describe an approach to predicting style of images, and perform a thorough evaluation of different image features for these tasks. We find that features learned in a multi-layer network generally perform best -- even when trained with object class (not style) labels. Our large-scale learning methods results in the best published performance on an existing dataset of aesthetic ratings and photographic style annotations. We present two novel datasets: 80K Flickr photographs annotated with 20 curated style labels, and 85K paintings annotated with 25 style/genre labels. Our approach shows excellent classification performance on both datasets. We use the learned classifiers to extend traditional tag-based image search to consider stylistic constraints, and demonstrate cross-dataset understanding of style. Click to Read Paper
Knowing where people look and click on visual designs can provide clues about how the designs are perceived, and where the most important or relevant content lies. The most important content of a visual design can be used for effective summarization or to facilitate retrieval from a database. We present automated models that predict the relative importance of different elements in data visualizations and graphic designs. Our models are neural networks trained on human clicks and importance annotations on hundreds of designs. We collected a new dataset of crowdsourced importance, and analyzed the predictions of our models with respect to ground truth importance and human eye movements. We demonstrate how such predictions of importance can be used for automatic design retargeting and thumbnailing. User studies with hundreds of MTurk participants validate that, with limited post-processing, our importance-driven applications are on par with, or outperform, current state-of-the-art methods, including natural image saliency. We also provide a demonstration of how our importance predictions can be built into interactive design tools to offer immediate feedback during the design process. Click to Read Paper