Research papers and code for "An-Chieh Cheng":
Neural Architecture Search (NAS) aims at finding one "single" architecture that achieves the best accuracy for a given task such as image recognition.In this paper, we study the instance-level variation,and demonstrate that instance-awareness is an important yet currently missing component of NAS. Based on this observation, we propose InstaNAS for searching toward instance-level architectures;the controller is trained to search and form a "distribution of architectures" instead of a single final architecture. Then during the inference phase, the controller selects an architecture from the distribution, tailored for each unseen image to achieve both high accuracy and short latency. The experimental results show that InstaNAS reduces the inference latency without compromising classification accuracy. On average, InstaNAS achieves 48.9% latency reduction on CIFAR-10 and 40.2% latency reduction on CIFAR-100 with respect to MobileNetV2 architecture.

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Recent breakthroughs in Neural Architectural Search (NAS) have achieved state-of-the-art performance in many tasks such as image classification and language understanding. However, most existing works only optimize for model accuracy and largely ignore other important factors imposed by the underlying hardware and devices, such as latency and energy, when making inference. In this paper, we first introduce the problem of NAS and provide a survey on recent works. Then we deep dive into two recent advancements on extending NAS into multiple-objective frameworks: MONAS and DPP-Net. Both MONAS and DPP-Net are capable of optimizing accuracy and other objectives imposed by devices, searching for neural architectures that can be best deployed on a wide spectrum of devices: from embedded systems and mobile devices to workstations. Experimental results are poised to show that architectures found by MONAS and DPP-Net achieves Pareto optimality w.r.t the given objectives for various devices.

* ICCAD'18 Invited Paper
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Recent breakthroughs in Neural Architectural Search (NAS) have achieved state-of-the-art performances in applications such as image classification and language modeling. However, these techniques typically ignore device-related objectives such as inference time, memory usage, and power consumption. Optimizing neural architecture for device-related objectives is immensely crucial for deploying deep networks on portable devices with limited computing resources. We propose DPP-Net: Device-aware Progressive Search for Pareto-optimal Neural Architectures, optimizing for both device-related (e.g., inference time and memory usage) and device-agnostic (e.g., accuracy and model size) objectives. DPP-Net employs a compact search space inspired by current state-of-the-art mobile CNNs, and further improves search efficiency by adopting progressive search (Liu et al. 2017). Experimental results on CIFAR-10 are poised to demonstrate the effectiveness of Pareto-optimal networks found by DPP-Net, for three different devices: (1) a workstation with Titan X GPU, (2) NVIDIA Jetson TX1 embedded system, and (3) mobile phone with ARM Cortex-A53. Compared to CondenseNet and NASNet (Mobile), DPP-Net achieves better performances: higher accuracy and shorter inference time on various devices. Additional experimental results show that models found by DPP-Net also achieve considerably-good performance on ImageNet as well.

* 13 pages 9 figures, ECCV 2018 Camera Ready
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Lingvo is a Tensorflow framework offering a complete solution for collaborative deep learning research, with a particular focus towards sequence-to-sequence models. Lingvo models are composed of modular building blocks that are flexible and easily extensible, and experiment configurations are centralized and highly customizable. Distributed training and quantized inference are supported directly within the framework, and it contains existing implementations of a large number of utilities, helper functions, and the newest research ideas. Lingvo has been used in collaboration by dozens of researchers in more than 20 papers over the last two years. This document outlines the underlying design of Lingvo and serves as an introduction to the various pieces of the framework, while also offering examples of advanced features that showcase the capabilities of the framework.

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In this paper, we investigate the use of an unsupervised label clustering technique and demonstrate that it enables substantial improvements in visual relationship prediction accuracy on the Person in Context (PIC) dataset. We propose to group object labels with similar patterns of relationship distribution in the dataset into fewer categories. Label clustering not only mitigates both the large classification space and class imbalance issues, but also potentially increases data samples for each clustered category. We further propose to incorporate depth information as an additional feature into the instance segmentation model. The additional depth prediction path supplements the relationship prediction model in a way that bounding boxes or segmentation masks are unable to deliver. We have rigorously evaluated the proposed techniques and performed various ablation analysis to validate the benefits of them.

* Won 2nd place in Person In Context Challenge (ECCV 2018 workshop)
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Scale of data and scale of computation infrastructures together enable the current deep learning renaissance. However, training large-scale deep architectures demands both algorithmic improvement and careful system configuration. In this paper, we focus on employing the system approach to speed up large-scale training. Via lessons learned from our routine benchmarking effort, we first identify bottlenecks and overheads that hinter data parallelism. We then devise guidelines that help practitioners to configure an effective system and fine-tune parameters to achieve desired speedup. Specifically, we develop a procedure for setting minibatch size and choosing computation algorithms. We also derive lemmas for determining the quantity of key components such as the number of GPUs and parameter servers. Experiments and examples show that these guidelines help effectively speed up large-scale deep learning training.

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