Models, code, and papers for "Ankur Bapna":

Non-Parametric Adaptation for Neural Machine Translation

Feb 28, 2019
Ankur Bapna, Orhan Firat

Neural Networks trained with gradient descent are known to be susceptible to catastrophic forgetting caused by parameter shift during the training process. In the context of Neural Machine Translation (NMT) this results in poor performance on heterogeneous datasets and on sub-tasks like rare phrase translation. On the other hand, non-parametric approaches are immune to forgetting, perfectly complementing the generalization ability of NMT. However, attempts to combine non-parametric or retrieval based approaches with NMT have only been successful on narrow domains, possibly due to over-reliance on sentence level retrieval. We propose a novel n-gram level retrieval approach that relies on local phrase level similarities, allowing us to retrieve neighbors that are useful for translation even when overall sentence similarity is low. We complement this with an expressive neural network, allowing our model to extract information from the noisy retrieved context. We evaluate our semi-parametric NMT approach on a heterogeneous dataset composed of WMT, IWSLT, JRC-Acquis and OpenSubtitles, and demonstrate gains on all 4 evaluation sets. The semi-parametric nature of our approach opens the door for non-parametric domain adaptation, demonstrating strong inference-time adaptation performance on new domains without the need for any parameter updates.

* To appear at NAACL 2019 

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Simple, Scalable Adaptation for Neural Machine Translation

Sep 18, 2019
Ankur Bapna, Naveen Arivazhagan, Orhan Firat

Fine-tuning pre-trained Neural Machine Translation (NMT) models is the dominant approach for adapting to new languages and domains. However, fine-tuning requires adapting and maintaining a separate model for each target task. We propose a simple yet efficient approach for adaptation in NMT. Our proposed approach consists of injecting tiny task specific adapter layers into a pre-trained model. These lightweight adapters, with just a small fraction of the original model size, adapt the model to multiple individual tasks simultaneously. We evaluate our approach on two tasks: (i) Domain Adaptation and (ii) Massively Multilingual NMT. Experiments on domain adaptation demonstrate that our proposed approach is on par with full fine-tuning on various domains, dataset sizes and model capacities. On a massively multilingual dataset of 103 languages, our adaptation approach bridges the gap between individual bilingual models and one massively multilingual model for most language pairs, paving the way towards universal machine translation.

* EMNLP 2019 

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Sequential Dialogue Context Modeling for Spoken Language Understanding

Jul 07, 2017
Ankur Bapna, Gokhan Tur, Dilek Hakkani-Tur, Larry Heck

Spoken Language Understanding (SLU) is a key component of goal oriented dialogue systems that would parse user utterances into semantic frame representations. Traditionally SLU does not utilize the dialogue history beyond the previous system turn and contextual ambiguities are resolved by the downstream components. In this paper, we explore novel approaches for modeling dialogue context in a recurrent neural network (RNN) based language understanding system. We propose the Sequential Dialogue Encoder Network, that allows encoding context from the dialogue history in chronological order. We compare the performance of our proposed architecture with two context models, one that uses just the previous turn context and another that encodes dialogue context in a memory network, but loses the order of utterances in the dialogue history. Experiments with a multi-domain dialogue dataset demonstrate that the proposed architecture results in reduced semantic frame error rates.

* 8 + 2 pages, Updated 10/17: Updated typos in abstract, Updated 07/07: Updated Title, abstract and few minor changes 

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Towards Zero-Shot Frame Semantic Parsing for Domain Scaling

Jul 07, 2017
Ankur Bapna, Gokhan Tur, Dilek Hakkani-Tur, Larry Heck

State-of-the-art slot filling models for goal-oriented human/machine conversational language understanding systems rely on deep learning methods. While multi-task training of such models alleviates the need for large in-domain annotated datasets, bootstrapping a semantic parsing model for a new domain using only the semantic frame, such as the back-end API or knowledge graph schema, is still one of the holy grail tasks of language understanding for dialogue systems. This paper proposes a deep learning based approach that can utilize only the slot description in context without the need for any labeled or unlabeled in-domain examples, to quickly bootstrap a new domain. The main idea of this paper is to leverage the encoding of the slot names and descriptions within a multi-task deep learned slot filling model, to implicitly align slots across domains. The proposed approach is promising for solving the domain scaling problem and eliminating the need for any manually annotated data or explicit schema alignment. Furthermore, our experiments on multiple domains show that this approach results in significantly better slot-filling performance when compared to using only in-domain data, especially in the low data regime.

* 4 pages + 1 references 

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Revisiting Character-Based Neural Machine Translation with Capacity and Compression

Aug 29, 2018
Colin Cherry, George Foster, Ankur Bapna, Orhan Firat, Wolfgang Macherey

Translating characters instead of words or word-fragments has the potential to simplify the processing pipeline for neural machine translation (NMT), and improve results by eliminating hyper-parameters and manual feature engineering. However, it results in longer sequences in which each symbol contains less information, creating both modeling and computational challenges. In this paper, we show that the modeling problem can be solved by standard sequence-to-sequence architectures of sufficient depth, and that deep models operating at the character level outperform identical models operating over word fragments. This result implies that alternative architectures for handling character input are better viewed as methods for reducing computation time than as improved ways of modeling longer sequences. From this perspective, we evaluate several techniques for character-level NMT, verify that they do not match the performance of our deep character baseline model, and evaluate the performance versus computation time tradeoffs they offer. Within this framework, we also perform the first evaluation for NMT of conditional computation over time, in which the model learns which timesteps can be skipped, rather than having them be dictated by a fixed schedule specified before training begins.

* To appear at EMNLP 2018 

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Investigating Multilingual NMT Representations at Scale

Sep 11, 2019
Sneha Reddy Kudugunta, Ankur Bapna, Isaac Caswell, Naveen Arivazhagan, Orhan Firat

Multilingual Neural Machine Translation (NMT) models have yielded large empirical success in transfer learning settings. However, these black-box representations are poorly understood, and their mode of transfer remains elusive. In this work, we attempt to understand massively multilingual NMT representations (with 103 languages) using Singular Value Canonical Correlation Analysis (SVCCA), a representation similarity framework that allows us to compare representations across different languages, layers and models. Our analysis validates several empirical results and long-standing intuitions, and unveils new observations regarding how representations evolve in a multilingual translation model. We draw three major conclusions from our analysis, with implications on cross-lingual transfer learning: (i) Encoder representations of different languages cluster based on linguistic similarity, (ii) Representations of a source language learned by the encoder are dependent on the target language, and vice-versa, and (iii) Representations of high resource and/or linguistically similar languages are more robust when fine-tuning on an arbitrary language pair, which is critical to determining how much cross-lingual transfer can be expected in a zero or few-shot setting. We further connect our findings with existing empirical observations in multilingual NMT and transfer learning.

* Paper at EMNLP 2019 

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Training Deeper Neural Machine Translation Models with Transparent Attention

Sep 04, 2018
Ankur Bapna, Mia Xu Chen, Orhan Firat, Yuan Cao, Yonghui Wu

While current state-of-the-art NMT models, such as RNN seq2seq and Transformers, possess a large number of parameters, they are still shallow in comparison to convolutional models used for both text and vision applications. In this work we attempt to train significantly (2-3x) deeper Transformer and Bi-RNN encoders for machine translation. We propose a simple modification to the attention mechanism that eases the optimization of deeper models, and results in consistent gains of 0.7-1.1 BLEU on the benchmark WMT'14 English-German and WMT'15 Czech-English tasks for both architectures.

* To appear in EMNLP 2018 

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The Missing Ingredient in Zero-Shot Neural Machine Translation

Mar 17, 2019
Naveen Arivazhagan, Ankur Bapna, Orhan Firat, Roee Aharoni, Melvin Johnson, Wolfgang Macherey

Multilingual Neural Machine Translation (NMT) models are capable of translating between multiple source and target languages. Despite various approaches to train such models, they have difficulty with zero-shot translation: translating between language pairs that were not together seen during training. In this paper we first diagnose why state-of-the-art multilingual NMT models that rely purely on parameter sharing, fail to generalize to unseen language pairs. We then propose auxiliary losses on the NMT encoder that impose representational invariance across languages. Our simple approach vastly improves zero-shot translation quality without regressing on supervised directions. For the first time, on WMT14 English-FrenchGerman, we achieve zero-shot performance that is on par with pivoting. We also demonstrate the easy scalability of our approach to multiple languages on the IWSLT 2017 shared task.


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Building a Conversational Agent Overnight with Dialogue Self-Play

Jan 15, 2018
Pararth Shah, Dilek Hakkani-Tür, Gokhan Tür, Abhinav Rastogi, Ankur Bapna, Neha Nayak, Larry Heck

We propose Machines Talking To Machines (M2M), a framework combining automation and crowdsourcing to rapidly bootstrap end-to-end dialogue agents for goal-oriented dialogues in arbitrary domains. M2M scales to new tasks with just a task schema and an API client from the dialogue system developer, but it is also customizable to cater to task-specific interactions. Compared to the Wizard-of-Oz approach for data collection, M2M achieves greater diversity and coverage of salient dialogue flows while maintaining the naturalness of individual utterances. In the first phase, a simulated user bot and a domain-agnostic system bot converse to exhaustively generate dialogue "outlines", i.e. sequences of template utterances and their semantic parses. In the second phase, crowd workers provide contextual rewrites of the dialogues to make the utterances more natural while preserving their meaning. The entire process can finish within a few hours. We propose a new corpus of 3,000 dialogues spanning 2 domains collected with M2M, and present comparisons with popular dialogue datasets on the quality and diversity of the surface forms and dialogue flows.

* 11 pages, 4 figures 

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Evaluating the Cross-Lingual Effectiveness of Massively Multilingual Neural Machine Translation

Sep 01, 2019
Aditya Siddhant, Melvin Johnson, Henry Tsai, Naveen Arivazhagan, Jason Riesa, Ankur Bapna, Orhan Firat, Karthik Raman

The recently proposed massively multilingual neural machine translation (NMT) system has been shown to be capable of translating over 100 languages to and from English within a single model. Its improved translation performance on low resource languages hints at potential cross-lingual transfer capability for downstream tasks. In this paper, we evaluate the cross-lingual effectiveness of representations from the encoder of a massively multilingual NMT model on 5 downstream classification and sequence labeling tasks covering a diverse set of over 50 languages. We compare against a strong baseline, multilingual BERT (mBERT), in different cross-lingual transfer learning scenarios and show gains in zero-shot transfer in 4 out of these 5 tasks.


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Large-Scale Multilingual Speech Recognition with a Streaming End-to-End Model

Sep 11, 2019
Anjuli Kannan, Arindrima Datta, Tara N. Sainath, Eugene Weinstein, Bhuvana Ramabhadran, Yonghui Wu, Ankur Bapna, Zhifeng Chen, Seungji Lee

Multilingual end-to-end (E2E) models have shown great promise in expansion of automatic speech recognition (ASR) coverage of the world's languages. They have shown improvement over monolingual systems, and have simplified training and serving by eliminating language-specific acoustic, pronunciation, and language models. This work presents an E2E multilingual system which is equipped to operate in low-latency interactive applications, as well as handle a key challenge of real world data: the imbalance in training data across languages. Using nine Indic languages, we compare a variety of techniques, and find that a combination of conditioning on a language vector and training language-specific adapter layers produces the best model. The resulting E2E multilingual model achieves a lower word error rate (WER) than both monolingual E2E models (eight of nine languages) and monolingual conventional systems (all nine languages).

* Accepted in Interspeech 2019 

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The Best of Both Worlds: Combining Recent Advances in Neural Machine Translation

Apr 27, 2018
Mia Xu Chen, Orhan Firat, Ankur Bapna, Melvin Johnson, Wolfgang Macherey, George Foster, Llion Jones, Niki Parmar, Mike Schuster, Zhifeng Chen, Yonghui Wu, Macduff Hughes

The past year has witnessed rapid advances in sequence-to-sequence (seq2seq) modeling for Machine Translation (MT). The classic RNN-based approaches to MT were first out-performed by the convolutional seq2seq model, which was then out-performed by the more recent Transformer model. Each of these new approaches consists of a fundamental architecture accompanied by a set of modeling and training techniques that are in principle applicable to other seq2seq architectures. In this paper, we tease apart the new architectures and their accompanying techniques in two ways. First, we identify several key modeling and training techniques, and apply them to the RNN architecture, yielding a new RNMT+ model that outperforms all of the three fundamental architectures on the benchmark WMT'14 English to French and English to German tasks. Second, we analyze the properties of each fundamental seq2seq architecture and devise new hybrid architectures intended to combine their strengths. Our hybrid models obtain further improvements, outperforming the RNMT+ model on both benchmark datasets.


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Massively Multilingual Neural Machine Translation in the Wild: Findings and Challenges

Jul 11, 2019
Naveen Arivazhagan, Ankur Bapna, Orhan Firat, Dmitry Lepikhin, Melvin Johnson, Maxim Krikun, Mia Xu Chen, Yuan Cao, George Foster, Colin Cherry, Wolfgang Macherey, Zhifeng Chen, Yonghui Wu

We introduce our efforts towards building a universal neural machine translation (NMT) system capable of translating between any language pair. We set a milestone towards this goal by building a single massively multilingual NMT model handling 103 languages trained on over 25 billion examples. Our system demonstrates effective transfer learning ability, significantly improving translation quality of low-resource languages, while keeping high-resource language translation quality on-par with competitive bilingual baselines. We provide in-depth analysis of various aspects of model building that are crucial to achieving quality and practicality in universal NMT. While we prototype a high-quality universal translation system, our extensive empirical analysis exposes issues that need to be further addressed, and we suggest directions for future research.


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Lingvo: a Modular and Scalable Framework for Sequence-to-Sequence Modeling

Feb 21, 2019
Jonathan Shen, Patrick Nguyen, Yonghui Wu, Zhifeng Chen, Mia X. Chen, Ye Jia, Anjuli Kannan, Tara Sainath, Yuan Cao, Chung-Cheng Chiu, Yanzhang He, Jan Chorowski, Smit Hinsu, Stella Laurenzo, James Qin, Orhan Firat, Wolfgang Macherey, Suyog Gupta, Ankur Bapna, Shuyuan Zhang, Ruoming Pang, Ron J. Weiss, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Qiao Liang, Benoit Jacob, Bowen Liang, HyoukJoong Lee, Ciprian Chelba, Sébastien Jean, Bo Li, Melvin Johnson, Rohan Anil, Rajat Tibrewal, Xiaobing Liu, Akiko Eriguchi, Navdeep Jaitly, Naveen Ari, Colin Cherry, Parisa Haghani, Otavio Good, Youlong Cheng, Raziel Alvarez, Isaac Caswell, Wei-Ning Hsu, Zongheng Yang, Kuan-Chieh Wang, Ekaterina Gonina, Katrin Tomanek, Ben Vanik, Zelin Wu, Llion Jones, Mike Schuster, Yanping Huang, Dehao Chen, Kazuki Irie, George Foster, John Richardson, Klaus Macherey, Antoine Bruguier, Heiga Zen, Colin Raffel, Shankar Kumar, Kanishka Rao, David Rybach, Matthew Murray, Vijayaditya Peddinti, Maxim Krikun, Michiel A. U. Bacchiani, Thomas B. Jablin, Rob Suderman, Ian Williams, Benjamin Lee, Deepti Bhatia, Justin Carlson, Semih Yavuz, Yu Zhang, Ian McGraw, Max Galkin, Qi Ge, Golan Pundak, Chad Whipkey, Todd Wang, Uri Alon, Dmitry Lepikhin, Ye Tian, Sara Sabour, William Chan, Shubham Toshniwal, Baohua Liao, Michael Nirschl, Pat Rondon

Lingvo is a Tensorflow framework offering a complete solution for collaborative deep learning research, with a particular focus towards sequence-to-sequence models. Lingvo models are composed of modular building blocks that are flexible and easily extensible, and experiment configurations are centralized and highly customizable. Distributed training and quantized inference are supported directly within the framework, and it contains existing implementations of a large number of utilities, helper functions, and the newest research ideas. Lingvo has been used in collaboration by dozens of researchers in more than 20 papers over the last two years. This document outlines the underlying design of Lingvo and serves as an introduction to the various pieces of the framework, while also offering examples of advanced features that showcase the capabilities of the framework.


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