Models, code, and papers for "Claudine Badue":

Visual Global Localization with a Hybrid WNN-CNN Approach

May 14, 2018
Avelino Forechi, Thiago Oliveira-Santos, Claudine Badue, Alberto F. De Souza

Currently, self-driving cars rely greatly on the Global Positioning System (GPS) infrastructure, albeit there is an increasing demand for alternative methods for GPS-denied environments. One of them is known as place recognition, which associates images of places with their corresponding positions. We previously proposed systems based on Weightless Neural Networks (WNN) to address this problem as a classification task. This encompasses solely one part of the global localization, which is not precise enough for driverless cars. Instead of just recognizing past places and outputting their poses, it is desired that a global localization system estimates the pose of current place images. In this paper, we propose to tackle this problem as follows. Firstly, given a live image, the place recognition system returns the most similar image and its pose. Then, given live and recollected images, a visual localization system outputs the relative camera pose represented by those images. To estimate the relative camera pose between the recollected and the current images, a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) is trained with the two images as input and a relative pose vector as output. Together, these systems solve the global localization problem using the topological and metric information to approximate the current vehicle pose. The full approach is compared to a Real- Time Kinematic GPS system and a Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) system. Experimental results show that the proposed approach correctly localizes a vehicle 90% of the time with a mean error of 1.20m compared to 1.12m of the SLAM system and 0.37m of the GPS, 89% of the time.

* Accepted by IEEE 2018 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN) 

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Copycat CNN: Stealing Knowledge by Persuading Confession with Random Non-Labeled Data

Jun 14, 2018
Jacson Rodrigues Correia-Silva, Rodrigo F. Berriel, Claudine Badue, Alberto F. de Souza, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

In the past few years, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have been achieving state-of-the-art performance on a variety of problems. Many companies employ resources and money to generate these models and provide them as an API, therefore it is in their best interest to protect them, i.e., to avoid that someone else copies them. Recent studies revealed that state-of-the-art CNNs are vulnerable to adversarial examples attacks, and this weakness indicates that CNNs do not need to operate in the problem domain (PD). Therefore, we hypothesize that they also do not need to be trained with examples of the PD in order to operate in it. Given these facts, in this paper, we investigate if a target black-box CNN can be copied by persuading it to confess its knowledge through random non-labeled data. The copy is two-fold: i) the target network is queried with random data and its predictions are used to create a fake dataset with the knowledge of the network; and ii) a copycat network is trained with the fake dataset and should be able to achieve similar performance as the target network. This hypothesis was evaluated locally in three problems (facial expression, object, and crosswalk classification) and against a cloud-based API. In the copy attacks, images from both non-problem domain and PD were used. All copycat networks achieved at least 93.7% of the performance of the original models with non-problem domain data, and at least 98.6% using additional data from the PD. Additionally, the copycat CNN successfully copied at least 97.3% of the performance of the Microsoft Azure Emotion API. Our results show that it is possible to create a copycat CNN by simply querying a target network as black-box with random non-labeled data.

* 8 pages, 3 figures, accepted by IJCNN 2018 

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Cross-Domain Car Detection Using Unsupervised Image-to-Image Translation: From Day to Night

Jul 19, 2019
Vinicius F. Arruda, Thiago M. Paixão, Rodrigo F. Berriel, Alberto F. De Souza, Claudine Badue, Nicu Sebe, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

Deep learning techniques have enabled the emergence of state-of-the-art models to address object detection tasks. However, these techniques are data-driven, delegating the accuracy to the training dataset which must resemble the images in the target task. The acquisition of a dataset involves annotating images, an arduous and expensive process, generally requiring time and manual effort. Thus, a challenging scenario arises when the target domain of application has no annotated dataset available, making tasks in such situation to lean on a training dataset of a different domain. Sharing this issue, object detection is a vital task for autonomous vehicles where the large amount of driving scenarios yields several domains of application requiring annotated data for the training process. In this work, a method for training a car detection system with annotated data from a source domain (day images) without requiring the image annotations of the target domain (night images) is presented. For that, a model based on Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) is explored to enable the generation of an artificial dataset with its respective annotations. The artificial dataset (fake dataset) is created translating images from day-time domain to night-time domain. The fake dataset, which comprises annotated images of only the target domain (night images), is then used to train the car detector model. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieved significant and consistent improvements, including the increasing by more than 10% of the detection performance when compared to the training with only the available annotated data (i.e., day images).

* 8 pages, 8 figures, https://github.com/viniciusarruda/cross-domain-car-detection and accepted at IJCNN 2019 

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Effortless Deep Training for Traffic Sign Detection Using Templates and Arbitrary Natural Images

Jul 23, 2019
Lucas Tabelini Torres, Thiago M. Paixão, Rodrigo F. Berriel, Alberto F. De Souza, Claudine Badue, Nicu Sebe, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

Deep learning has been successfully applied to several problems related to autonomous driving. Often, these solutions rely on large networks that require databases of real image samples of the problem (i.e., real world) for proper training. The acquisition of such real-world data sets is not always possible in the autonomous driving context, and sometimes their annotation is not feasible (e.g., takes too long or is too expensive). Moreover, in many tasks, there is an intrinsic data imbalance that most learning-based methods struggle to cope with. It turns out that traffic sign detection is a problem in which these three issues are seen altogether. In this work, we propose a novel database generation method that requires only (i) arbitrary natural images, i.e., requires no real image from the domain of interest, and (ii) templates of the traffic signs, i.e., templates synthetically created to illustrate the appearance of the category of a traffic sign. The effortlessly generated training database is shown to be effective for the training of a deep detector (such as Faster R-CNN) on German traffic signs, achieving 95.66% of mAP on average. In addition, the proposed method is able to detect traffic signs with an average precision, recall and F1-score of about 94%, 91% and 93%, respectively. The experiments surprisingly show that detectors can be trained with simple data generation methods and without problem domain data for the background, which is in the opposite direction of the common sense for deep learning.


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Map Memorization and Forgetting in the IARA Autonomous Car

Oct 04, 2018
Thomas Teixeira, Filipe Mutz, Vinicius B. Cardoso, Lucas Veronese, Claudine Badue, Thiago Oliveira-Santos, Alberto F. De Souza

In this work, we present a novel strategy for correcting imperfections in occupancy grid maps called map decay. The objective of map decay is to correct invalid occupancy probabilities of map cells that are unobservable by sensors. The strategy was inspired by an analogy between the memory architecture believed to exist in the human brain and the maps maintained by an autonomous vehicle. It consists in merging sensory information obtained during runtime (online) with a priori data from a high-precision map constructed offline. In map decay, cells observed by sensors are updated using traditional occupancy grid mapping techniques and unobserved cells are adjusted so that their occupancy probabilities tend to the values found in the offline map. This strategy is grounded in the idea that the most precise information available about an unobservable cell is the value found in the high-precision offline map. Map decay was successfully tested and is still in use in the IARA autonomous vehicle from Universidade Federal do Esp\'irito Santo.


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Bio-Inspired Foveated Technique for Augmented-Range Vehicle Detection Using Deep Neural Networks

Oct 02, 2019
Pedro Azevedo, Sabrina S. Panceri, Rânik Guidolini, Vinicius B. Cardoso, Claudine Badue, Thiago Oliveira-Santos, Alberto F. De Souza

We propose a bio-inspired foveated technique to detect cars in a long range camera view using a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) for the IARA self-driving car. The DCNN receives as input (i) an image, which is captured by a camera installed on IARA's roof; and (ii) crops of the image, which are centered in the waypoints computed by IARA's path planner and whose sizes increase with the distance from IARA. We employ an overlap filter to discard detections of the same car in different crops of the same image based on the percentage of overlap of detections' bounding boxes. We evaluated the performance of the proposed augmented-range vehicle detection system (ARVDS) using the hardware and software infrastructure available in the IARA self-driving car. Using IARA, we captured thousands of images of real traffic situations containing cars in a long range. Experimental results show that ARVDS increases the Average Precision (AP) of long range car detection from 29.51% (using a single whole image) to 63.15%.

* Paper accepted at IJCNN 2019 

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A Model-Predictive Motion Planner for the IARA Autonomous Car

Nov 09, 2017
Vinicius Cardoso, Josias Oliveira, Thomas Teixeira, Claudine Badue, Filipe Mutz, Thiago Oliveira-Santos, Lucas Veronese, Alberto F. De Souza

We present the Model-Predictive Motion Planner (MPMP) of the Intelligent Autonomous Robotic Automobile (IARA). IARA is a fully autonomous car that uses a path planner to compute a path from its current position to the desired destination. Using this path, the current position, a goal in the path and a map, IARA's MPMP is able to compute smooth trajectories from its current position to the goal in less than 50 ms. MPMP computes the poses of these trajectories so that they follow the path closely and, at the same time, are at a safe distance of eventual obstacles. Our experiments have shown that MPMP is able to compute trajectories that precisely follow a path produced by a Human driver (distance of 0.15 m in average) while smoothly driving IARA at speeds of up to 32.4 km/h (9 m/s).

* IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2017), 2017, pp. 225-230 
* This is a preprint. Accepted by 2017 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) 

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Mapping Road Lanes Using Laser Remission and Deep Neural Networks

Apr 27, 2018
Raphael V. Carneiro, Rafael C. Nascimento, Rânik Guidolini, Vinicius B. Cardoso, Thiago Oliveira-Santos, Claudine Badue, Alberto F. De Souza

We propose the use of deep neural networks (DNN) for solving the problem of inferring the position and relevant properties of lanes of urban roads with poor or absent horizontal signalization, in order to allow the operation of autonomous cars in such situations. We take a segmentation approach to the problem and use the Efficient Neural Network (ENet) DNN for segmenting LiDAR remission grid maps into road maps. We represent road maps using what we called road grid maps. Road grid maps are square matrixes and each element of these matrixes represents a small square region of real-world space. The value of each element is a code associated with the semantics of the road map. Our road grid maps contain all information about the roads' lanes required for building the Road Definition Data Files (RDDFs) that are necessary for the operation of our autonomous car, IARA (Intelligent Autonomous Robotic Automobile). We have built a dataset of tens of kilometers of manually marked road lanes and used part of it to train ENet to segment road grid maps from remission grid maps. After being trained, ENet achieved an average segmentation accuracy of 83.7%. We have tested the use of inferred road grid maps in the real world using IARA on a stretch of 3.7 km of urban roads and it has shown performance equivalent to that of the previous IARA's subsystem that uses a manually generated RDDF.

* Accepted by IEEE 2018 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN) 

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Traffic Light Recognition Using Deep Learning and Prior Maps for Autonomous Cars

Jun 04, 2019
Lucas C. Possatti, Rânik Guidolini, Vinicius B. Cardoso, Rodrigo F. Berriel, Thiago M. Paixão, Claudine Badue, Alberto F. De Souza, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

Autonomous terrestrial vehicles must be capable of perceiving traffic lights and recognizing their current states to share the streets with human drivers. Most of the time, human drivers can easily identify the relevant traffic lights. To deal with this issue, a common solution for autonomous cars is to integrate recognition with prior maps. However, additional solution is required for the detection and recognition of the traffic light. Deep learning techniques have showed great performance and power of generalization including traffic related problems. Motivated by the advances in deep learning, some recent works leveraged some state-of-the-art deep detectors to locate (and further recognize) traffic lights from 2D camera images. However, none of them combine the power of the deep learning-based detectors with prior maps to recognize the state of the relevant traffic lights. Based on that, this work proposes to integrate the power of deep learning-based detection with the prior maps used by our car platform IARA (acronym for Intelligent Autonomous Robotic Automobile) to recognize the relevant traffic lights of predefined routes. The process is divided in two phases: an offline phase for map construction and traffic lights annotation; and an online phase for traffic light recognition and identification of the relevant ones. The proposed system was evaluated on five test cases (routes) in the city of Vit\'oria, each case being composed of a video sequence and a prior map with the relevant traffic lights for the route. Results showed that the proposed technique is able to correctly identify the relevant traffic light along the trajectory.

* Accepted in 2019 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN) 

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Self-Driving Cars: A Survey

Jan 14, 2019
Claudine Badue, Rânik Guidolini, Raphael Vivacqua Carneiro, Pedro Azevedo, Vinicius Brito Cardoso, Avelino Forechi, Luan Ferreira Reis Jesus, Rodrigo Ferreira Berriel, Thiago Meireles Paixão, Filipe Mutz, Thiago Oliveira-Santos, Alberto Ferreira De Souza

We survey research on self-driving cars published in the literature focusing on autonomous cars developed since the DARPA challenges, which are equipped with an autonomy system that can be categorized as SAE level 3 or higher. The architecture of the autonomy system of self-driving cars is typically organized into the perception system and the decision-making system. The perception system is generally divided into many subsystems responsible for tasks such as self-driving-car localization, static obstacles mapping, moving obstacles detection and tracking, road mapping, traffic signalization detection and recognition, among others. The decision-making system is commonly partitioned as well into many subsystems responsible for tasks such as route planning, path planning, behavior selection, motion planning, and control. In this survey, we present the typical architecture of the autonomy system of self-driving cars. We also review research on relevant methods for perception and decision making. Furthermore, we present a detailed description of the architecture of the autonomy system of the UFES's car, IARA. Finally, we list prominent autonomous research cars developed by technology companies and reported in the media.


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