Research papers and code for "David K. Han":
Simulators that generate observations based on theoretical models can be important tools for development, prediction, and assessment of signal processing algorithms. In order to design these simulators, painstaking effort is required to construct mathematical models according to their application. Complex models are sometimes necessary to represent a variety of real phenomena. In contrast, obtaining synthetic observations from generative models developed from real observations often require much less effort. This paper proposes a generative model based on adversarial learning. Given that observations are typically signals composed of a linear combination of sinusoidal waves and random noises, sinusoidal wave generating networks are first designed based on an adversarial network. Audio waveform generation can then be performed using the proposed network. Several approaches to designing the objective function of the proposed network using adversarial learning are investigated experimentally. In addition, amphibian sound classification is performed using a convolutional neural network trained with real and synthetic sounds. Both qualitative and quantitative results show that the proposed generative model makes realistic signals and is very helpful for data augmentation and data analysis.

* This paper has been revised from our previous manuscripts as following reviewer's comments in ICML, NIP, and IEEE TSP
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Many real-world applications give rise to large heterogeneous networks where nodes and edges can be of any arbitrary type (e.g., user, web page, location). Special cases of such heterogeneous graphs include homogeneous graphs, bipartite, k-partite, signed, labeled graphs, among many others. In this work, we generalize the notion of network motifs to heterogeneous networks. In particular, small induced typed subgraphs called typed graphlets (heterogeneous network motifs) are introduced and shown to be the fundamental building blocks of complex heterogeneous networks. Typed graphlets are a powerful generalization of the notion of graphlet (network motif) to heterogeneous networks as they capture both the induced subgraph of interest and the types associated with the nodes in the induced subgraph. To address this problem, we propose a fast, parallel, and space-efficient framework for counting typed graphlets in large networks. We discover the existence of non-trivial combinatorial relationships between lower-order ($k-1$)-node typed graphlets and leverage them for deriving many of the $k$-node typed graphlets in $o(1)$ constant time. Thus, we avoid explicit enumeration of those typed graphlets. Notably, the time complexity matches the best untyped graphlet counting algorithm. The experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework in terms of runtime, space-efficiency, parallel speedup, and scalability as it is able to handle large-scale networks.

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DTG are designed to share some of the advantages of TAG while overcoming some of its limitations. DTG involve two composition operations called subsertion and sister-adjunction. The most distinctive feature of DTG is that, unlike TAG, there is complete uniformity in the way that the two DTG operations relate lexical items: subsertion always corresponds to complementation and sister-adjunction to modification. Furthermore, DTG, unlike TAG, can provide a uniform analysis for em wh-movement in English and Kashmiri, despite the fact that the em wh element in Kashmiri appears in sentence-second position, and not sentence-initial position as in English.

* Latex source, needs aclap.sty, 8 pages, to appear in ACL-95
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In order to tell stories in different voices for different audiences, interactive story systems require: (1) a semantic representation of story structure, and (2) the ability to automatically generate story and dialogue from this semantic representation using some form of Natural Language Generation (NLG). However, there has been limited research on methods for linking story structures to narrative descriptions of scenes and story events. In this paper we present an automatic method for converting from Scheherazade's story intention graph, a semantic representation, to the input required by the Personage NLG engine. Using 36 Aesop Fables distributed in DramaBank, a collection of story encodings, we train translation rules on one story and then test these rules by generating text for the remaining 35. The results are measured in terms of the string similarity metrics Levenshtein Distance and BLEU score. The results show that we can generate the 35 stories with correct content: the test set stories on average are close to the output of the Scheherazade realizer, which was customized to this semantic representation. We provide some examples of story variations generated by personage. In future work, we will experiment with measuring the quality of the same stories generated in different voices, and with techniques for making storytelling interactive.

* International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS 2013)
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We introduce overdispersed black-box variational inference, a method to reduce the variance of the Monte Carlo estimator of the gradient in black-box variational inference. Instead of taking samples from the variational distribution, we use importance sampling to take samples from an overdispersed distribution in the same exponential family as the variational approximation. Our approach is general since it can be readily applied to any exponential family distribution, which is the typical choice for the variational approximation. We run experiments on two non-conjugate probabilistic models to show that our method effectively reduces the variance, and the overhead introduced by the computation of the proposal parameters and the importance weights is negligible. We find that our overdispersed importance sampling scheme provides lower variance than black-box variational inference, even when the latter uses twice the number of samples. This results in faster convergence of the black-box inference procedure.

* 10 pages, 6 figures
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Interest in multioutput kernel methods is increasing, whether under the guise of multitask learning, multisensor networks or structured output data. From the Gaussian process perspective a multioutput Mercer kernel is a covariance function over correlated output functions. One way of constructing such kernels is based on convolution processes (CP). A key problem for this approach is efficient inference. Alvarez and Lawrence (2009) recently presented a sparse approximation for CPs that enabled efficient inference. In this paper, we extend this work in two directions: we introduce the concept of variational inducing functions to handle potential non-smooth functions involved in the kernel CP construction and we consider an alternative approach to approximate inference based on variational methods, extending the work by Titsias (2009) to the multiple output case. We demonstrate our approaches on prediction of school marks, compiler performance and financial time series.

* Technical report, 22 pages, 8 figures
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As compared to simple actions, activities are much more complex, but semantically consistent with a human's real life. Techniques for action recognition from sensor generated data are mature. However, there has been relatively little work on bridging the gap between actions and activities. To this end, this paper presents a novel approach for complex activity recognition comprising of two components. The first component is temporal pattern mining, which provides a mid-level feature representation for activities, encodes temporal relatedness among actions, and captures the intrinsic properties of activities. The second component is adaptive Multi-Task Learning, which captures relatedness among activities and selects discriminant features. Extensive experiments on a real-world dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of our work.

* IJCAI 2015
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With the rapid development of digital imaging and communication technologies, image set based face recognition (ISFR) is becoming increasingly important. One key issue of ISFR is how to effectively and efficiently represent the query face image set by using the gallery face image sets. The set-to-set distance based methods ignore the relationship between gallery sets, while representing the query set images individually over the gallery sets ignores the correlation between query set images. In this paper, we propose a novel image set based collaborative representation and classification method for ISFR. By modeling the query set as a convex or regularized hull, we represent this hull collaboratively over all the gallery sets. With the resolved representation coefficients, the distance between the query set and each gallery set can then be calculated for classification. The proposed model naturally and effectively extends the image based collaborative representation to an image set based one, and our extensive experiments on benchmark ISFR databases show the superiority of the proposed method to state-of-the-art ISFR methods under different set sizes in terms of both recognition rate and efficiency.

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Classifying streaming data requires the development of methods which are computationally efficient and able to cope with changes in the underlying distribution of the stream, a phenomenon known in the literature as concept drift. We propose a new method for detecting concept drift which uses an Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA) chart to monitor the misclassification rate of an streaming classifier. Our approach is modular and can hence be run in parallel with any underlying classifier to provide an additional layer of concept drift detection. Moreover our method is computationally efficient with overhead O(1) and works in a fully online manner with no need to store data points in memory. Unlike many existing approaches to concept drift detection, our method allows the rate of false positive detections to be controlled and kept constant over time.

* Pattern Recognition Letters, 33(2) 191-198, 2012
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Swarms of autonomous surface vehicles equipped with environmental sensors and decentralized communications bring a new wave of attractive possibilities for the monitoring of dynamic features in oceans and other waterbodies. However, a key challenge in swarm robotics design is the efficient collective operation of heterogeneous systems. We present both theoretical analysis and field experiments on the responsiveness in dynamic area coverage of a collective of 22 autonomous buoys, where 4 units are upgraded to a new design that allows them to move 80\% faster than the rest. This system is able to react on timescales of the minute to changes in areas on the order of a few thousand square meters. We have observed that this partial upgrade of the system significantly increases its average responsiveness, without necessarily improving the spatial uniformity of the deployment. These experiments show that the autonomous buoy designs and the cooperative control rule described in this work provide an efficient, flexible, and scalable solution for the pervasive and persistent monitoring of water environments.

* Proceedings of the OCEANS 2018 conference
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Availability of an explainable deep learning model that can be applied to practical real world scenarios and in turn, can consistently, rapidly and accurately identify specific and minute traits in applicable fields of biological sciences, is scarce. Here we consider one such real world example viz., accurate identification, classification and quantification of biotic and abiotic stresses in crop research and production. Up until now, this has been predominantly done manually by visual inspection and require specialized training. However, such techniques are hindered by subjectivity resulting from inter- and intra-rater cognitive variability. Here, we demonstrate the ability of a machine learning framework to identify and classify a diverse set of foliar stresses in the soybean plant with remarkable accuracy. We also present an explanation mechanism using gradient-weighted class activation mapping that isolates the visual symptoms used by the model to make predictions. This unsupervised identification of unique visual symptoms for each stress provides a quantitative measure of stress severity, allowing for identification, classification and quantification in one framework. The learnt model appears to be agnostic to species and make good predictions for other (non-soybean) species, demonstrating an ability of transfer learning.

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Categorical distributions are ubiquitous in machine learning, e.g., in classification, language models, and recommendation systems. However, when the number of possible outcomes is very large, using categorical distributions becomes computationally expensive, as the complexity scales linearly with the number of outcomes. To address this problem, we propose augment and reduce (A&R), a method to alleviate the computational complexity. A&R uses two ideas: latent variable augmentation and stochastic variational inference. It maximizes a lower bound on the marginal likelihood of the data. Unlike existing methods which are specific to softmax, A&R is more general and is amenable to other categorical models, such as multinomial probit. On several large-scale classification problems, we show that A&R provides a tighter bound on the marginal likelihood and has better predictive performance than existing approaches.

* Francisco J. R. Ruiz, Michalis K. Titsias, Adji B. Dieng, and David M. Blei. Augment and Reduce: Stochastic Inference for Large Categorical Distributions. International Conference on Machine Learning. Stockholm (Sweden), July 2018
* 11 pages, 2 figures
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Given a high-dimensional data set we often wish to find the strongest relationships within it. A common strategy is to evaluate a measure of dependence on every variable pair and retain the highest-scoring pairs for follow-up. This strategy works well if the statistic used is equitable [Reshef et al. 2015a], i.e., if, for some measure of noise, it assigns similar scores to equally noisy relationships regardless of relationship type (e.g., linear, exponential, periodic). In this paper, we introduce and characterize a population measure of dependence called MIC*. We show three ways that MIC* can be viewed: as the population value of MIC, a highly equitable statistic from [Reshef et al. 2011], as a canonical "smoothing" of mutual information, and as the supremum of an infinite sequence defined in terms of optimal one-dimensional partitions of the marginals of the joint distribution. Based on this theory, we introduce an efficient approach for computing MIC* from the density of a pair of random variables, and we define a new consistent estimator MICe for MIC* that is efficiently computable. In contrast, there is no known polynomial-time algorithm for computing the original equitable statistic MIC. We show through simulations that MICe has better bias-variance properties than MIC. We then introduce and prove the consistency of a second statistic, TICe, that is a trivial side-product of the computation of MICe and whose goal is powerful independence testing rather than equitability. We show in simulations that MICe and TICe have good equitability and power against independence respectively. The analyses here complement a more in-depth empirical evaluation of several leading measures of dependence [Reshef et al. 2015b] that shows state-of-the-art performance for MICe and TICe.

* J.Mach.Learn.Res. 17 (2016), 1-63
* Yakir A. Reshef and David N. Reshef are co-first authors, Pardis C. Sabeti and Michael M. Mitzenmacher are co-last authors. This paper, together with arXiv:1505.02212, subsumes arXiv:1408.4908. v3 includes new analyses and exposition
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In mechanism design it is typical to impose incentive compatibility and then derive an optimal mechanism subject to this constraint. By replacing the incentive compatibility requirement with the goal of minimizing expected ex post regret, we are able to adapt statistical machine learning techniques to the design of payment rules. This computational approach to mechanism design is applicable to domains with multi-dimensional types and situations where computational efficiency is a concern. Specifically, given an outcome rule and access to a type distribution, we train a support vector machine with a special discriminant function structure such that it implicitly establishes a payment rule with desirable incentive properties. We discuss applications to a multi-minded combinatorial auction with a greedy winner-determination algorithm and to an assignment problem with egalitarian outcome rule. Experimental results demonstrate both that the construction produces payment rules with low ex post regret, and that penalizing classification errors is effective in preventing failures of ex post individual rationality.

* Proceedings of the 13th ACM Conference on Electronic Commerce (EC '12), pages 477-494, 2012
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Swarm robotics has experienced a rapid expansion in recent years, primarily fueled by specialized multi-robot systems developed to achieve dedicated collective actions. These specialized platforms are in general designed with swarming considerations at the front and center. Key hardware and software elements required for swarming are often deeply embedded and integrated with the particular system. However, given the noticeable increase in the number of low-cost mobile robots readily available, practitioners and hobbyists may start considering to assemble full-fledged swarms by minimally retrofitting such mobile platforms with a swarm-enabling technology. Here, we report one possible embodiment of such a technology designed to enable the assembly and the study of swarming in a range of general-purpose robotic systems. This is achieved by combining a modular and transferable software toolbox with a hardware suite composed of a collection of low-cost and off-the-shelf components. The developed technology can be ported to a relatively vast range of robotic platforms with minimal changes and high levels of scalability. This swarm-enabling technology has successfully been implemented on two distinct distributed multi-robot systems, a swarm of mobile marine buoys and a team of commercial terrestrial robots. We have tested the effectiveness of both of these distributed robotic systems in performing collective exploration and search scenarios, as well as other classical cooperative behaviors. Experimental results on different swarm behaviors are reported for the two platforms in uncontrolled environments and without any supporting infrastructure. The design of the associated software library allows for a seamless switch to other cooperative behaviors, and also offers the possibility to simulate newly designed collective behaviors prior to their implementation onto the platforms.

* Frontiers in Robotics and AI (4):12, 2017
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For agents and robots to become more useful, they must be able to quickly learn from non-technical users. This paper investigates the problem of interactively learning behaviors communicated by a human teacher using positive and negative feedback. Much previous work on this problem has made the assumption that people provide feedback for decisions that is dependent on the behavior they are teaching and is independent from the learner's current policy. We present empirical results that show this assumption to be false---whether human trainers give a positive or negative feedback for a decision is influenced by the learner's current policy. We argue that policy-dependent feedback, in addition to being commonplace, enables useful training strategies from which agents should benefit. Based on this insight, we introduce Convergent Actor-Critic by Humans (COACH), an algorithm for learning from policy-dependent feedback that converges to a local optimum. Finally, we demonstrate that COACH can successfully learn multiple behaviors on a physical robot, even with noisy image features.

* 7 pages, 2 figures
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Feed-forward convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are currently state-of-the-art for object classification tasks such as ImageNet. Further, they are quantitatively accurate models of temporally-averaged responses of neurons in the primate brain's visual system. However, biological visual systems have two ubiquitous architectural features not shared with typical CNNs: local recurrence within cortical areas, and long-range feedback from downstream areas to upstream areas. Here we explored the role of recurrence in improving classification performance. We found that standard forms of recurrence (vanilla RNNs and LSTMs) do not perform well within deep CNNs on the ImageNet task. In contrast, novel cells that incorporated two structural features, bypassing and gating, were able to boost task accuracy substantially. We extended these design principles in an automated search over thousands of model architectures, which identified novel local recurrent cells and long-range feedback connections useful for object recognition. Moreover, these task-optimized ConvRNNs matched the dynamics of neural activity in the primate visual system better than feedforward networks, suggesting a role for the brain's recurrent connections in performing difficult visual behaviors.

* NIPS 2018 Camera Ready Version, 16 pages including supplementary information, 6 figures
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An understanding of pedestrians dynamics is indispensable for numerous urban applications including the design of transportation networks and planing for business development. Pedestrian counting often requires utilizing manual or technical means to count individual pedestrians in each location of interest. However, such methods do not scale to the size of a city and a new approach to fill this gap is here proposed. In this project, we used a large dense dataset of images of New York City along with deep learning and computer vision techniques to construct a spatio-temporal map of relative pedestrian density. Due to the limitations of state of the art computer vision methods, such automatic detection of pedestrians is inherently subject to errors. We model these errors as a probabilistic process, for which we provide theoretical analysis and through numerical simulations. We demonstrate that, within our assumptions, our methodology can supply a reasonable estimate of pedestrian densities and provide theoretical bounds for the resulting error.

* Submitted to ACM-TSAS
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Modern CNN are typically based on floating point linear algebra based implementations. Recently, reduced precision NN have been gaining popularity as they require significantly less memory and computational resources compared to floating point. This is particularly important in power constrained compute environments. However, in many cases a reduction in precision comes at a small cost to the accuracy of the resultant network. In this work, we investigate the accuracy-throughput trade-off for various parameter precision applied to different types of NN models. We firstly propose a quantization training strategy that allows reduced precision NN inference with a lower memory footprint and competitive model accuracy. Then, we quantitatively formulate the relationship between data representation and hardware efficiency. Our experiments finally provide insightful observation. For example, one of our tests show 32-bit floating point is more hardware efficient than 1-bit parameters to achieve 99% MNIST accuracy. In general, 2-bit and 4-bit fixed point parameters show better hardware trade-off on small-scale datasets like MNIST and CIFAR-10 while 4-bit provide the best trade-off in large-scale tasks like AlexNet on ImageNet dataset within our tested problem domain.

* Accepted by ARC 2018
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