Models, code, and papers for "Deepak Pathak":

Third-Person Visual Imitation Learning via Decoupled Hierarchical Controller

Nov 21, 2019
Pratyusha Sharma, Deepak Pathak, Abhinav Gupta

We study a generalized setup for learning from demonstration to build an agent that can manipulate novel objects in unseen scenarios by looking at only a single video of human demonstration from a third-person perspective. To accomplish this goal, our agent should not only learn to understand the intent of the demonstrated third-person video in its context but also perform the intended task in its environment configuration. Our central insight is to enforce this structure explicitly during learning by decoupling what to achieve (intended task) from how to perform it (controller). We propose a hierarchical setup where a high-level module learns to generate a series of first-person sub-goals conditioned on the third-person video demonstration, and a low-level controller predicts the actions to achieve those sub-goals. Our agent acts from raw image observations without any access to the full state information. We show results on a real robotic platform using Baxter for the manipulation tasks of pouring and placing objects in a box. Project video and code are at https://pathak22.github.io/hierarchical-imitation/

* Accepted at NeurIPS 2019. Videos at https://pathak22.github.io/hierarchical-imitation/ 

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Self-Supervised Exploration via Disagreement

Jun 10, 2019
Deepak Pathak, Dhiraj Gandhi, Abhinav Gupta

Efficient exploration is a long-standing problem in sensorimotor learning. Major advances have been demonstrated in noise-free, non-stochastic domains such as video games and simulation. However, most of these formulations either get stuck in environments with stochastic dynamics or are too inefficient to be scalable to real robotics setups. In this paper, we propose a formulation for exploration inspired by the work in active learning literature. Specifically, we train an ensemble of dynamics models and incentivize the agent to explore such that the disagreement of those ensembles is maximized. This allows the agent to learn skills by exploring in a self-supervised manner without any external reward. Notably, we further leverage the disagreement objective to optimize the agent's policy in a differentiable manner, without using reinforcement learning, which results in a sample-efficient exploration. We demonstrate the efficacy of this formulation across a variety of benchmark environments including stochastic-Atari, Mujoco and Unity. Finally, we implement our differentiable exploration on a real robot which learns to interact with objects completely from scratch. Project videos and code are at https://pathak22.github.io/exploration-by-disagreement/

* Accepted at ICML 2019. Website at https://pathak22.github.io/exploration-by-disagreement/ 

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Constrained Convolutional Neural Networks for Weakly Supervised Segmentation

Oct 18, 2015
Deepak Pathak, Philipp Krähenbühl, Trevor Darrell

We present an approach to learn a dense pixel-wise labeling from image-level tags. Each image-level tag imposes constraints on the output labeling of a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) classifier. We propose Constrained CNN (CCNN), a method which uses a novel loss function to optimize for any set of linear constraints on the output space (i.e. predicted label distribution) of a CNN. Our loss formulation is easy to optimize and can be incorporated directly into standard stochastic gradient descent optimization. The key idea is to phrase the training objective as a biconvex optimization for linear models, which we then relax to nonlinear deep networks. Extensive experiments demonstrate the generality of our new learning framework. The constrained loss yields state-of-the-art results on weakly supervised semantic image segmentation. We further demonstrate that adding slightly more supervision can greatly improve the performance of the learning algorithm.

* 12 pages, ICCV 2015 

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Compositional GAN: Learning Conditional Image Composition

Aug 23, 2018
Samaneh Azadi, Deepak Pathak, Sayna Ebrahimi, Trevor Darrell

Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) can produce images of surprising complexity and realism, but are generally modeled to sample from a single latent source ignoring the explicit spatial interaction between multiple entities that could be present in a scene. Capturing such complex interactions between different objects in the world, including their relative scaling, spatial layout, occlusion, or viewpoint transformation is a challenging problem. In this work, we propose to model object composition in a GAN framework as a self-consistent composition-decomposition network. Our model is conditioned on the object images from their marginal distributions to generate a realistic image from their joint distribution by explicitly learning the possible interactions. We evaluate our model through qualitative experiments and user evaluations in both the scenarios when either paired or unpaired examples for the individual object images and the joint scenes are given during training. Our results reveal that the learned model captures potential interactions between the two object domains given as input to output new instances of composed scene at test time in a reasonable fashion.


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Curiosity-driven Exploration by Self-supervised Prediction

May 15, 2017
Deepak Pathak, Pulkit Agrawal, Alexei A. Efros, Trevor Darrell

In many real-world scenarios, rewards extrinsic to the agent are extremely sparse, or absent altogether. In such cases, curiosity can serve as an intrinsic reward signal to enable the agent to explore its environment and learn skills that might be useful later in its life. We formulate curiosity as the error in an agent's ability to predict the consequence of its own actions in a visual feature space learned by a self-supervised inverse dynamics model. Our formulation scales to high-dimensional continuous state spaces like images, bypasses the difficulties of directly predicting pixels, and, critically, ignores the aspects of the environment that cannot affect the agent. The proposed approach is evaluated in two environments: VizDoom and Super Mario Bros. Three broad settings are investigated: 1) sparse extrinsic reward, where curiosity allows for far fewer interactions with the environment to reach the goal; 2) exploration with no extrinsic reward, where curiosity pushes the agent to explore more efficiently; and 3) generalization to unseen scenarios (e.g. new levels of the same game) where the knowledge gained from earlier experience helps the agent explore new places much faster than starting from scratch. Demo video and code available at https://pathak22.github.io/noreward-rl/

* In ICML 2017. Website at https://pathak22.github.io/noreward-rl/ 

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Fully Convolutional Multi-Class Multiple Instance Learning

Apr 15, 2015
Deepak Pathak, Evan Shelhamer, Jonathan Long, Trevor Darrell

Multiple instance learning (MIL) can reduce the need for costly annotation in tasks such as semantic segmentation by weakening the required degree of supervision. We propose a novel MIL formulation of multi-class semantic segmentation learning by a fully convolutional network. In this setting, we seek to learn a semantic segmentation model from just weak image-level labels. The model is trained end-to-end to jointly optimize the representation while disambiguating the pixel-image label assignment. Fully convolutional training accepts inputs of any size, does not need object proposal pre-processing, and offers a pixelwise loss map for selecting latent instances. Our multi-class MIL loss exploits the further supervision given by images with multiple labels. We evaluate this approach through preliminary experiments on the PASCAL VOC segmentation challenge.

* in ICLR 2015 

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Detector Discovery in the Wild: Joint Multiple Instance and Representation Learning

Dec 02, 2014
Judy Hoffman, Deepak Pathak, Trevor Darrell, Kate Saenko

We develop methods for detector learning which exploit joint training over both weak and strong labels and which transfer learned perceptual representations from strongly-labeled auxiliary tasks. Previous methods for weak-label learning often learn detector models independently using latent variable optimization, but fail to share deep representation knowledge across classes and usually require strong initialization. Other previous methods transfer deep representations from domains with strong labels to those with only weak labels, but do not optimize over individual latent boxes, and thus may miss specific salient structures for a particular category. We propose a model that subsumes these previous approaches, and simultaneously trains a representation and detectors for categories with either weak or strong labels present. We provide a novel formulation of a joint multiple instance learning method that includes examples from classification-style data when available, and also performs domain transfer learning to improve the underlying detector representation. Our model outperforms known methods on ImageNet-200 detection with weak labels.

* Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) 2015 

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Constrained Structured Regression with Convolutional Neural Networks

Nov 23, 2015
Deepak Pathak, Philipp Krähenbühl, Stella X. Yu, Trevor Darrell

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have recently emerged as the dominant model in computer vision. If provided with enough training data, they predict almost any visual quantity. In a discrete setting, such as classification, CNNs are not only able to predict a label but often predict a confidence in the form of a probability distribution over the output space. In continuous regression tasks, such a probability estimate is often lacking. We present a regression framework which models the output distribution of neural networks. This output distribution allows us to infer the most likely labeling following a set of physical or modeling constraints. These constraints capture the intricate interplay between different input and output variables, and complement the output of a CNN. However, they may not hold everywhere. Our setup further allows to learn a confidence with which a constraint holds, in the form of a distribution of the constrain satisfaction. We evaluate our approach on the problem of intrinsic image decomposition, and show that constrained structured regression significantly increases the state-of-the-art.


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Learning to Control Self-Assembling Morphologies: A Study of Generalization via Modularity

Feb 14, 2019
Deepak Pathak, Chris Lu, Trevor Darrell, Phillip Isola, Alexei A. Efros

Contemporary sensorimotor learning approaches typically start with an existing complex agent (e.g., a robotic arm), which they learn to control. In contrast, this paper investigates a modular co-evolution strategy: a collection of primitive agents learns to dynamically self-assemble into composite bodies while also learning to coordinate their behavior to control these bodies. Each primitive agent consists of a limb with a motor attached at one end. Limbs may choose to link up to form collectives. When a limb initiates a link-up action and there is another limb nearby, the latter is magnetically connected to the 'parent' limb's motor. This forms a new single agent, which may further link with other agents. In this way, complex morphologies can emerge, controlled by a policy whose architecture is in explicit correspondence with the morphology. We evaluate the performance of these 'dynamic' and 'modular' agents in simulated environments. We demonstrate better generalization to test-time changes both in the environment, as well as in the agent morphology, compared to static and monolithic baselines. Project videos and code are available at https://pathak22.github.io/modular-assemblies/

* Website at https://pathak22.github.io/modular-assemblies/ 

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Learning Features by Watching Objects Move

Apr 12, 2017
Deepak Pathak, Ross Girshick, Piotr Dollár, Trevor Darrell, Bharath Hariharan

This paper presents a novel yet intuitive approach to unsupervised feature learning. Inspired by the human visual system, we explore whether low-level motion-based grouping cues can be used to learn an effective visual representation. Specifically, we use unsupervised motion-based segmentation on videos to obtain segments, which we use as 'pseudo ground truth' to train a convolutional network to segment objects from a single frame. Given the extensive evidence that motion plays a key role in the development of the human visual system, we hope that this straightforward approach to unsupervised learning will be more effective than cleverly designed 'pretext' tasks studied in the literature. Indeed, our extensive experiments show that this is the case. When used for transfer learning on object detection, our representation significantly outperforms previous unsupervised approaches across multiple settings, especially when training data for the target task is scarce.

* CVPR 2017 

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Context Encoders: Feature Learning by Inpainting

Nov 21, 2016
Deepak Pathak, Philipp Krahenbuhl, Jeff Donahue, Trevor Darrell, Alexei A. Efros

We present an unsupervised visual feature learning algorithm driven by context-based pixel prediction. By analogy with auto-encoders, we propose Context Encoders -- a convolutional neural network trained to generate the contents of an arbitrary image region conditioned on its surroundings. In order to succeed at this task, context encoders need to both understand the content of the entire image, as well as produce a plausible hypothesis for the missing part(s). When training context encoders, we have experimented with both a standard pixel-wise reconstruction loss, as well as a reconstruction plus an adversarial loss. The latter produces much sharper results because it can better handle multiple modes in the output. We found that a context encoder learns a representation that captures not just appearance but also the semantics of visual structures. We quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of our learned features for CNN pre-training on classification, detection, and segmentation tasks. Furthermore, context encoders can be used for semantic inpainting tasks, either stand-alone or as initialization for non-parametric methods.

* CVPR 2016 
* New results on ImageNet Generation 

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Investigating Human Priors for Playing Video Games

Jul 25, 2018
Rachit Dubey, Pulkit Agrawal, Deepak Pathak, Thomas L. Griffiths, Alexei A. Efros

What makes humans so good at solving seemingly complex video games? Unlike computers, humans bring in a great deal of prior knowledge about the world, enabling efficient decision making. This paper investigates the role of human priors for solving video games. Given a sample game, we conduct a series of ablation studies to quantify the importance of various priors on human performance. We do this by modifying the video game environment to systematically mask different types of visual information that could be used by humans as priors. We find that removal of some prior knowledge causes a drastic degradation in the speed with which human players solve the game, e.g. from 2 minutes to over 20 minutes. Furthermore, our results indicate that general priors, such as the importance of objects and visual consistency, are critical for efficient game-play. Videos and the game manipulations are available at https://rach0012.github.io/humanRL_website/

* ICML 2018 
* ICML 2018 

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Large-Scale Study of Curiosity-Driven Learning

Aug 13, 2018
Yuri Burda, Harri Edwards, Deepak Pathak, Amos Storkey, Trevor Darrell, Alexei A. Efros

Reinforcement learning algorithms rely on carefully engineering environment rewards that are extrinsic to the agent. However, annotating each environment with hand-designed, dense rewards is not scalable, motivating the need for developing reward functions that are intrinsic to the agent. Curiosity is a type of intrinsic reward function which uses prediction error as reward signal. In this paper: (a) We perform the first large-scale study of purely curiosity-driven learning, i.e. without any extrinsic rewards, across 54 standard benchmark environments, including the Atari game suite. Our results show surprisingly good performance, and a high degree of alignment between the intrinsic curiosity objective and the hand-designed extrinsic rewards of many game environments. (b) We investigate the effect of using different feature spaces for computing prediction error and show that random features are sufficient for many popular RL game benchmarks, but learned features appear to generalize better (e.g. to novel game levels in Super Mario Bros.). (c) We demonstrate limitations of the prediction-based rewards in stochastic setups. Game-play videos and code are at https://pathak22.github.io/large-scale-curiosity/

* First three authors contributed equally and ordered alphabetically. Website at https://pathak22.github.io/large-scale-curiosity/ 

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Learning Instance Segmentation by Interaction

Jun 21, 2018
Deepak Pathak, Yide Shentu, Dian Chen, Pulkit Agrawal, Trevor Darrell, Sergey Levine, Jitendra Malik

We present an approach for building an active agent that learns to segment its visual observations into individual objects by interacting with its environment in a completely self-supervised manner. The agent uses its current segmentation model to infer pixels that constitute objects and refines the segmentation model by interacting with these pixels. The model learned from over 50K interactions generalizes to novel objects and backgrounds. To deal with noisy training signal for segmenting objects obtained by self-supervised interactions, we propose robust set loss. A dataset of robot's interactions along-with a few human labeled examples is provided as a benchmark for future research. We test the utility of the learned segmentation model by providing results on a downstream vision-based control task of rearranging multiple objects into target configurations from visual inputs alone. Videos, code, and robotic interaction dataset are available at https://pathak22.github.io/seg-by-interaction/

* Website at https://pathak22.github.io/seg-by-interaction/ 

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Toward Multimodal Image-to-Image Translation

Oct 24, 2018
Jun-Yan Zhu, Richard Zhang, Deepak Pathak, Trevor Darrell, Alexei A. Efros, Oliver Wang, Eli Shechtman

Many image-to-image translation problems are ambiguous, as a single input image may correspond to multiple possible outputs. In this work, we aim to model a \emph{distribution} of possible outputs in a conditional generative modeling setting. The ambiguity of the mapping is distilled in a low-dimensional latent vector, which can be randomly sampled at test time. A generator learns to map the given input, combined with this latent code, to the output. We explicitly encourage the connection between output and the latent code to be invertible. This helps prevent a many-to-one mapping from the latent code to the output during training, also known as the problem of mode collapse, and produces more diverse results. We explore several variants of this approach by employing different training objectives, network architectures, and methods of injecting the latent code. Our proposed method encourages bijective consistency between the latent encoding and output modes. We present a systematic comparison of our method and other variants on both perceptual realism and diversity.

* NIPS 2017 Final paper. v4 updated acknowledgment. Website: https://junyanz.github.io/BicycleGAN/ 

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Zero-Shot Visual Imitation

Apr 23, 2018
Deepak Pathak, Parsa Mahmoudieh, Guanghao Luo, Pulkit Agrawal, Dian Chen, Yide Shentu, Evan Shelhamer, Jitendra Malik, Alexei A. Efros, Trevor Darrell

The current dominant paradigm for imitation learning relies on strong supervision of expert actions to learn both 'what' and 'how' to imitate. We pursue an alternative paradigm wherein an agent first explores the world without any expert supervision and then distills its experience into a goal-conditioned skill policy with a novel forward consistency loss. In our framework, the role of the expert is only to communicate the goals (i.e., what to imitate) during inference. The learned policy is then employed to mimic the expert (i.e., how to imitate) after seeing just a sequence of images demonstrating the desired task. Our method is 'zero-shot' in the sense that the agent never has access to expert actions during training or for the task demonstration at inference. We evaluate our zero-shot imitator in two real-world settings: complex rope manipulation with a Baxter robot and navigation in previously unseen office environments with a TurtleBot. Through further experiments in VizDoom simulation, we provide evidence that better mechanisms for exploration lead to learning a more capable policy which in turn improves end task performance. Videos, models, and more details are available at https://pathak22.github.io/zeroshot-imitation/

* Oral presentation at ICLR 2018. Website at https://pathak22.github.io/zeroshot-imitation/ 

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