Models, code, and papers for "Derek G. Murray":

TensorFlow: A system for large-scale machine learning

May 31, 2016
Martín Abadi, Paul Barham, Jianmin Chen, Zhifeng Chen, Andy Davis, Jeffrey Dean, Matthieu Devin, Sanjay Ghemawat, Geoffrey Irving, Michael Isard, Manjunath Kudlur, Josh Levenberg, Rajat Monga, Sherry Moore, Derek G. Murray, Benoit Steiner, Paul Tucker, Vijay Vasudevan, Pete Warden, Martin Wicke, Yuan Yu, Xiaoqiang Zheng

TensorFlow is a machine learning system that operates at large scale and in heterogeneous environments. TensorFlow uses dataflow graphs to represent computation, shared state, and the operations that mutate that state. It maps the nodes of a dataflow graph across many machines in a cluster, and within a machine across multiple computational devices, including multicore CPUs, general-purpose GPUs, and custom designed ASICs known as Tensor Processing Units (TPUs). This architecture gives flexibility to the application developer: whereas in previous "parameter server" designs the management of shared state is built into the system, TensorFlow enables developers to experiment with novel optimizations and training algorithms. TensorFlow supports a variety of applications, with particularly strong support for training and inference on deep neural networks. Several Google services use TensorFlow in production, we have released it as an open-source project, and it has become widely used for machine learning research. In this paper, we describe the TensorFlow dataflow model in contrast to existing systems, and demonstrate the compelling performance that TensorFlow achieves for several real-world applications.

* 18 pages, 9 figures; v2 has a spelling correction in the metadata 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
SysML: The New Frontier of Machine Learning Systems

May 01, 2019
Alexander Ratner, Dan Alistarh, Gustavo Alonso, David G. Andersen, Peter Bailis, Sarah Bird, Nicholas Carlini, Bryan Catanzaro, Jennifer Chayes, Eric Chung, Bill Dally, Jeff Dean, Inderjit S. Dhillon, Alexandros Dimakis, Pradeep Dubey, Charles Elkan, Grigori Fursin, Gregory R. Ganger, Lise Getoor, Phillip B. Gibbons, Garth A. Gibson, Joseph E. Gonzalez, Justin Gottschlich, Song Han, Kim Hazelwood, Furong Huang, Martin Jaggi, Kevin Jamieson, Michael I. Jordan, Gauri Joshi, Rania Khalaf, Jason Knight, Jakub Konečný, Tim Kraska, Arun Kumar, Anastasios Kyrillidis, Aparna Lakshmiratan, Jing Li, Samuel Madden, H. Brendan McMahan, Erik Meijer, Ioannis Mitliagkas, Rajat Monga, Derek Murray, Kunle Olukotun, Dimitris Papailiopoulos, Gennady Pekhimenko, Theodoros Rekatsinas, Afshin Rostamizadeh, Christopher Ré, Christopher De Sa, Hanie Sedghi, Siddhartha Sen, Virginia Smith, Alex Smola, Dawn Song, Evan Sparks, Ion Stoica, Vivienne Sze, Madeleine Udell, Joaquin Vanschoren, Shivaram Venkataraman, Rashmi Vinayak, Markus Weimer, Andrew Gordon Wilson, Eric Xing, Matei Zaharia, Ce Zhang, Ameet Talwalkar

Machine learning (ML) techniques are enjoying rapidly increasing adoption. However, designing and implementing the systems that support ML models in real-world deployments remains a significant obstacle, in large part due to the radically different development and deployment profile of modern ML methods, and the range of practical concerns that come with broader adoption. We propose to foster a new systems machine learning research community at the intersection of the traditional systems and ML communities, focused on topics such as hardware systems for ML, software systems for ML, and ML optimized for metrics beyond predictive accuracy. To do this, we describe a new conference, SysML, that explicitly targets research at the intersection of systems and machine learning with a program committee split evenly between experts in systems and ML, and an explicit focus on topics at the intersection of the two.


  Click for Model/Code and Paper
TensorFlow: Large-Scale Machine Learning on Heterogeneous Distributed Systems

Mar 16, 2016
Martín Abadi, Ashish Agarwal, Paul Barham, Eugene Brevdo, Zhifeng Chen, Craig Citro, Greg S. Corrado, Andy Davis, Jeffrey Dean, Matthieu Devin, Sanjay Ghemawat, Ian Goodfellow, Andrew Harp, Geoffrey Irving, Michael Isard, Yangqing Jia, Rafal Jozefowicz, Lukasz Kaiser, Manjunath Kudlur, Josh Levenberg, Dan Mane, Rajat Monga, Sherry Moore, Derek Murray, Chris Olah, Mike Schuster, Jonathon Shlens, Benoit Steiner, Ilya Sutskever, Kunal Talwar, Paul Tucker, Vincent Vanhoucke, Vijay Vasudevan, Fernanda Viegas, Oriol Vinyals, Pete Warden, Martin Wattenberg, Martin Wicke, Yuan Yu, Xiaoqiang Zheng

TensorFlow is an interface for expressing machine learning algorithms, and an implementation for executing such algorithms. A computation expressed using TensorFlow can be executed with little or no change on a wide variety of heterogeneous systems, ranging from mobile devices such as phones and tablets up to large-scale distributed systems of hundreds of machines and thousands of computational devices such as GPU cards. The system is flexible and can be used to express a wide variety of algorithms, including training and inference algorithms for deep neural network models, and it has been used for conducting research and for deploying machine learning systems into production across more than a dozen areas of computer science and other fields, including speech recognition, computer vision, robotics, information retrieval, natural language processing, geographic information extraction, and computational drug discovery. This paper describes the TensorFlow interface and an implementation of that interface that we have built at Google. The TensorFlow API and a reference implementation were released as an open-source package under the Apache 2.0 license in November, 2015 and are available at www.tensorflow.org.

* Version 2 updates only the metadata, to correct the formatting of Mart\'in Abadi's name 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper