Research papers and code for "Egor Lakomkin":
In this paper, we describe KT-Speech-Crawler: an approach for automatic dataset construction for speech recognition by crawling YouTube videos. We outline several filtering and post-processing steps, which extract samples that can be used for training end-to-end neural speech recognition systems. In our experiments, we demonstrate that a single-core version of the crawler can obtain around 150 hours of transcribed speech within a day, containing an estimated 3.5% word error rate in the transcriptions. Automatically collected samples contain reading and spontaneous speech recorded in various conditions including background noise and music, distant microphone recordings, and a variety of accents and reverberation. When training a deep neural network on speech recognition, we observed around 40\% word error rate reduction on the Wall Street Journal dataset by integrating 200 hours of the collected samples into the training set. The demo (http://emnlp-demo.lakomkin.me/) and the crawler code (https://github.com/EgorLakomkin/KTSpeechCrawler) are publicly available.

* Accepted at the Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing 2018, Brussels, Belgium
Click to Read Paper and Get Code
The WASSA 2017 EmoInt shared task has the goal to predict emotion intensity values of tweet messages. Given the text of a tweet and its emotion category (anger, joy, fear, and sadness), the participants were asked to build a system that assigns emotion intensity values. Emotion intensity estimation is a challenging problem given the short length of the tweets, the noisy structure of the text and the lack of annotated data. To solve this problem, we developed an ensemble of two neural models, processing input on the character. and word-level with a lexicon-driven system. The correlation scores across all four emotions are averaged to determine the bottom-line competition metric, and our system ranks place forth in full intensity range and third in 0.5-1 range of intensity among 23 systems at the time of writing (June 2017).

Click to Read Paper and Get Code
In this work, we tackle a problem of speech emotion classification. One of the issues in the area of affective computation is that the amount of annotated data is very limited. On the other hand, the number of ways that the same emotion can be expressed verbally is enormous due to variability between speakers. This is one of the factors that limits performance and generalization. We propose a simple method that extracts audio samples from movies using textual sentiment analysis. As a result, it is possible to automatically construct a larger dataset of audio samples with positive, negative emotional and neutral speech. We show that pretraining recurrent neural network on such a dataset yields better results on the challenging EmotiW corpus. This experiment shows a potential benefit of combining textual sentiment analysis with vocal information.

Click to Read Paper and Get Code
Acoustic emotion recognition aims to categorize the affective state of the speaker and is still a difficult task for machine learning models. The difficulties come from the scarcity of training data, general subjectivity in emotion perception resulting in low annotator agreement, and the uncertainty about which features are the most relevant and robust ones for classification. In this paper, we will tackle the latter problem. Inspired by the recent success of transfer learning methods we propose a set of architectures which utilize neural representations inferred by training on large speech databases for the acoustic emotion recognition task. Our experiments on the IEMOCAP dataset show ~10% relative improvements in the accuracy and F1-score over the baseline recurrent neural network which is trained end-to-end for emotion recognition.

Click to Read Paper and Get Code
Previous work on emotion recognition demonstrated a synergistic effect of combining several modalities such as auditory, visual, and transcribed text to estimate the affective state of a speaker. Among these, the linguistic modality is crucial for the evaluation of an expressed emotion. However, manually transcribed spoken text cannot be given as input to a system practically. We argue that using ground-truth transcriptions during training and evaluation phases leads to a significant discrepancy in performance compared to real-world conditions, as the spoken text has to be recognized on the fly and can contain speech recognition mistakes. In this paper, we propose a method of integrating an automatic speech recognition (ASR) output with a character-level recurrent neural network for sentiment recognition. In addition, we conduct several experiments investigating sentiment recognition for human-robot interaction in a noise-realistic scenario which is challenging for the ASR systems. We quantify the improvement compared to using only the acoustic modality in sentiment recognition. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on the Multimodal Corpus of Sentiment Intensity (MOSI) by achieving 73,6% accuracy in a binary sentiment classification task, exceeding previously reported results that use only acoustic input. In addition, we set a new state-of-the-art performance on the MOSI dataset (80.4% accuracy, 2% absolute improvement).

* Accepted at the 2019 International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) will be held on May 20-24, 2019 in Montreal, Canada
Click to Read Paper and Get Code
Speech emotion recognition (SER) is an important aspect of effective human-robot collaboration and received a lot of attention from the research community. For example, many neural network-based architectures were proposed recently and pushed the performance to a new level. However, the applicability of such neural SER models trained only on in-domain data to noisy conditions is currently under-researched. In this work, we evaluate the robustness of state-of-the-art neural acoustic emotion recognition models in human-robot interaction scenarios. We hypothesize that a robot's ego noise, room conditions, and various acoustic events that can occur in a home environment can significantly affect the performance of a model. We conduct several experiments on the iCub robot platform and propose several novel ways to reduce the gap between the model's performance during training and testing in real-world conditions. Furthermore, we observe large improvements in the model performance on the robot and demonstrate the necessity of introducing several data augmentation techniques like overlaying background noise and loudness variations to improve the robustness of the neural approaches.

* Submitted to IROS'18, Madrid, Spain
Click to Read Paper and Get Code
Acoustically expressed emotions can make communication with a robot more efficient. Detecting emotions like anger could provide a clue for the robot indicating unsafe/undesired situations. Recently, several deep neural network-based models have been proposed which establish new state-of-the-art results in affective state evaluation. These models typically start processing at the end of each utterance, which not only requires a mechanism to detect the end of an utterance but also makes it difficult to use them in a real-time communication scenario, e.g. human-robot interaction. We propose the EmoRL model that triggers an emotion classification as soon as it gains enough confidence while listening to a person speaking. As a result, we minimize the need for segmenting the audio signal for classification and achieve lower latency as the audio signal is processed incrementally. The method is competitive with the accuracy of a strong baseline model, while allowing much earlier prediction.

* Accepted to the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA'18), Brisbane, Australia, May 21-25, 2018
Click to Read Paper and Get Code