Models, code, and papers for "Gabriel Perdue":

Restricted Boltzmann Machines for galaxy morphology classification with a quantum annealer

Nov 14, 2019
João Caldeira, Joshua Job, Steven H. Adachi, Brian Nord, Gabriel N. Perdue

We present the application of Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) to the task of astronomical image classification using a quantum annealer built by D-Wave Systems. Morphological analysis of galaxies provides critical information for studying their formation and evolution across cosmic time scales. We compress the images using principal component analysis to fit a representation on the quantum hardware. Then, we train RBMs with discriminative and generative algorithms, including contrastive divergence and hybrid generative-discriminative approaches. We compare these methods to Quantum Annealing (QA), Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Gibbs Sampling, Simulated Annealing (SA) as well as machine learning algorithms like gradient boosted decision trees. We find that RBMs implemented on D-wave hardware perform well, and that they show some classification performance advantages on small datasets, but they don't offer a broadly strategic advantage for this task. During this exploration, we analyzed the steps required for Boltzmann sampling with the D-Wave 2000Q, including a study of temperature estimation, and examined the impact of qubit noise by comparing and contrasting the original D-Wave 2000Q to the lower-noise version recently made available. While these analyses ultimately had minimal impact on the performance of the RBMs, we include them for reference.

* 13 pages; LaTeX; 11 figures 

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Inferring Convolutional Neural Networks' accuracies from their architectural characterizations

Jan 10, 2020
Duc Hoang, Jesse Hamer, Gabriel N. Perdue, Steven R. Young, Jonathan Miller, Anushree Ghosh

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have shown strong promise for analyzing scientific data from many domains including particle imaging detectors. However, the challenge of choosing the appropriate network architecture (depth, kernel shapes, activation functions, etc.) for specific applications and different data sets is still poorly understood. In this paper, we study the relationships between a CNN's architecture and its performance by proposing a systematic language that is useful for comparison between different CNN's architectures before training time. We characterize CNN's architecture by different attributes, and demonstrate that the attributes can be predictive of the networks' performance in two specific computer vision-based physics problems -- event vertex finding and hadron multiplicity classification in the MINERvA experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. In doing so, we extract several architectural attributes from optimized networks' architecture for the physics problems, which are outputs of a model selection algorithm called Multi-node Evolutionary Neural Networks for Deep Learning (MENNDL). We use machine learning models to predict whether a network can perform better than a certain threshold accuracy before training. The models perform 16-20% better than random guessing. Additionally, we found an coefficient of determination of 0.966 for an Ordinary Least Squares model in a regression on accuracy over a large population of networks.

* 6 pages, 5 figures, 5 tables, to appear in proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Machine Learning and Applications - ICMLA 2019 

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Deep Learning for Vertex Reconstruction of Neutrino-Nucleus Interaction Events with Combined Energy and Time Data

Feb 02, 2019
Linghao Song, Fan Chen, Steven R. Young, Catherine D. Schuman, Gabriel Perdue, Thomas E. Potok

We present a deep learning approach for vertex reconstruction of neutrino-nucleus interaction events, a problem in the domain of high energy physics. In this approach, we combine both energy and timing data that are collected in the MINERvA detector to perform classification and regression tasks. We show that the resulting network achieves higher accuracy than previous results while requiring a smaller model size and less training time. In particular, the proposed model outperforms the state-of-the-art by 4.00% on classification accuracy. For the regression task, our model achieves 0.9919 on the coefficient of determination, higher than the previous work (0.96).

* To appear in 2019 International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP 2019) 

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Machine Learning in High Energy Physics Community White Paper

Jul 08, 2018
Kim Albertsson, Piero Altoe, Dustin Anderson, Michael Andrews, Juan Pedro Araque Espinosa, Adam Aurisano, Laurent Basara, Adrian Bevan, Wahid Bhimji, Daniele Bonacorsi, Paolo Calafiura, Mario Campanelli, Louis Capps, Federico Carminati, Stefano Carrazza, Taylor Childers, Elias Coniavitis, Kyle Cranmer, Claire David, Douglas Davis, Javier Duarte, Martin Erdmann, Jonas Eschle, Amir Farbin, Matthew Feickert, Nuno Filipe Castro, Conor Fitzpatrick, Michele Floris, Alessandra Forti, Jordi Garra-Tico, Jochen Gemmler, Maria Girone, Paul Glaysher, Sergei Gleyzer, Vladimir Gligorov, Tobias Golling, Jonas Graw, Lindsey Gray, Dick Greenwood, Thomas Hacker, John Harvey, Benedikt Hegner, Lukas Heinrich, Ben Hooberman, Johannes Junggeburth, Michael Kagan, Meghan Kane, Konstantin Kanishchev, Przemysław Karpiński, Zahari Kassabov, Gaurav Kaul, Dorian Kcira, Thomas Keck, Alexei Klimentov, Jim Kowalkowski, Luke Kreczko, Alexander Kurepin, Rob Kutschke, Valentin Kuznetsov, Nicolas Köhler, Igor Lakomov, Kevin Lannon, Mario Lassnig, Antonio Limosani, Gilles Louppe, Aashrita Mangu, Pere Mato, Narain Meenakshi, Helge Meinhard, Dario Menasce, Lorenzo Moneta, Seth Moortgat, Mark Neubauer, Harvey Newman, Hans Pabst, Michela Paganini, Manfred Paulini, Gabriel Perdue, Uzziel Perez, Attilio Picazio, Jim Pivarski, Harrison Prosper, Fernanda Psihas, Alexander Radovic, Ryan Reece, Aurelius Rinkevicius, Eduardo Rodrigues, Jamal Rorie, David Rousseau, Aaron Sauers, Steven Schramm, Ariel Schwartzman, Horst Severini, Paul Seyfert, Filip Siroky, Konstantin Skazytkin, Mike Sokoloff, Graeme Stewart, Bob Stienen, Ian Stockdale, Giles Strong, Savannah Thais, Karen Tomko, Eli Upfal, Emanuele Usai, Andrey Ustyuzhanin, Martin Vala, Sofia Vallecorsa, Mauro Verzetti, Xavier Vilasís-Cardona, Jean-Roch Vlimant, Ilija Vukotic, Sean-Jiun Wang, Gordon Watts, Michael Williams, Wenjing Wu, Stefan Wunsch, Omar Zapata

Machine learning is an important research area in particle physics, beginning with applications to high-level physics analysis in the 1990s and 2000s, followed by an explosion of applications in particle and event identification and reconstruction in the 2010s. In this document we discuss promising future research and development areas in machine learning in particle physics with a roadmap for their implementation, software and hardware resource requirements, collaborative initiatives with the data science community, academia and industry, and training the particle physics community in data science. The main objective of the document is to connect and motivate these areas of research and development with the physics drivers of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider and future neutrino experiments and identify the resource needs for their implementation. Additionally we identify areas where collaboration with external communities will be of great benefit.

* Editors: Sergei Gleyzer, Paul Seyfert and Steven Schramm 

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