Models, code, and papers for "Heriberto Cuayáhuitl":

A Data-Efficient Deep Learning Approach for Deployable Multimodal Social Robots

Aug 27, 2019
Heriberto Cuayáhuitl

The deep supervised and reinforcement learning paradigms (among others) have the potential to endow interactive multimodal social robots with the ability of acquiring skills autonomously. But it is still not very clear yet how they can be best deployed in real world applications. As a step in this direction, we propose a deep learning-based approach for efficiently training a humanoid robot to play multimodal games---and use the game of `Noughts & Crosses' with two variants as a case study. Its minimum requirements for learning to perceive and interact are based on a few hundred example images, a few example multimodal dialogues and physical demonstrations of robot manipulation, and automatic simulations. In addition, we propose novel algorithms for robust visual game tracking and for competitive policy learning with high winning rates, which substantially outperform DQN-based baselines. While an automatic evaluation shows evidence that the proposed approach can be easily extended to new games with competitive robot behaviours, a human evaluation with 130 humans playing with the Pepper robot confirms that highly accurate visual perception is required for successful game play.


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SimpleDS: A Simple Deep Reinforcement Learning Dialogue System

Jan 18, 2016
Heriberto Cuayáhuitl

This paper presents 'SimpleDS', a simple and publicly available dialogue system trained with deep reinforcement learning. In contrast to previous reinforcement learning dialogue systems, this system avoids manual feature engineering by performing action selection directly from raw text of the last system and (noisy) user responses. Our initial results, in the restaurant domain, show that it is indeed possible to induce reasonable dialogue behaviour with an approach that aims for high levels of automation in dialogue control for intelligent interactive agents.

* International Workshop on Spoken Dialogue Systems (IWSDS), 2016 

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Training an Interactive Humanoid Robot Using Multimodal Deep Reinforcement Learning

Nov 26, 2016
Heriberto Cuayáhuitl, Guillaume Couly, Clément Olalainty

Training robots to perceive, act and communicate using multiple modalities still represents a challenging problem, particularly if robots are expected to learn efficiently from small sets of example interactions. We describe a learning approach as a step in this direction, where we teach a humanoid robot how to play the game of noughts and crosses. Given that multiple multimodal skills can be trained to play this game, we focus our attention to training the robot to perceive the game, and to interact in this game. Our multimodal deep reinforcement learning agent perceives multimodal features and exhibits verbal and non-verbal actions while playing. Experimental results using simulations show that the robot can learn to win or draw up to 98% of the games. A pilot test of the proposed multimodal system for the targeted game---integrating speech, vision and gestures---reports that reasonable and fluent interactions can be achieved using the proposed approach.

* NIPS Workshop on Future of Interactive Learning Machines, 2016 

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Strategic Dialogue Management via Deep Reinforcement Learning

Nov 25, 2015
Heriberto Cuayáhuitl, Simon Keizer, Oliver Lemon

Artificially intelligent agents equipped with strategic skills that can negotiate during their interactions with other natural or artificial agents are still underdeveloped. This paper describes a successful application of Deep Reinforcement Learning (DRL) for training intelligent agents with strategic conversational skills, in a situated dialogue setting. Previous studies have modelled the behaviour of strategic agents using supervised learning and traditional reinforcement learning techniques, the latter using tabular representations or learning with linear function approximation. In this study, we apply DRL with a high-dimensional state space to the strategic board game of Settlers of Catan---where players can offer resources in exchange for others and they can also reply to offers made by other players. Our experimental results report that the DRL-based learnt policies significantly outperformed several baselines including random, rule-based, and supervised-based behaviours. The DRL-based policy has a 53% win rate versus 3 automated players (`bots'), whereas a supervised player trained on a dialogue corpus in this setting achieved only 27%, versus the same 3 bots. This result supports the claim that DRL is a promising framework for training dialogue systems, and strategic agents with negotiation abilities.

* NIPS'15 Workshop on Deep Reinforcement Learning 

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A Study on Dialogue Reward Prediction for Open-Ended Conversational Agents

Dec 02, 2018
Heriberto Cuayáhuitl, Seonghan Ryu, Donghyeon Lee, Jihie Kim

The amount of dialogue history to include in a conversational agent is often underestimated and/or set in an empirical and thus possibly naive way. This suggests that principled investigations into optimal context windows are urgently needed given that the amount of dialogue history and corresponding representations can play an important role in the overall performance of a conversational system. This paper studies the amount of history required by conversational agents for reliably predicting dialogue rewards. The task of dialogue reward prediction is chosen for investigating the effects of varying amounts of dialogue history and their impact on system performance. Experimental results using a dataset of 18K human-human dialogues report that lengthy dialogue histories of at least 10 sentences are preferred (25 sentences being the best in our experiments) over short ones, and that lengthy histories are useful for training dialogue reward predictors with strong positive correlations between target dialogue rewards and predicted ones.

* In NeurIPS Workshop on Conversational AI: "Today's Practice and Tomorrow's Potential", December 2018 

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Deep Reinforcement Learning for Multi-Domain Dialogue Systems

Nov 26, 2016
Heriberto Cuayáhuitl, Seunghak Yu, Ashley Williamson, Jacob Carse

Standard deep reinforcement learning methods such as Deep Q-Networks (DQN) for multiple tasks (domains) face scalability problems. We propose a method for multi-domain dialogue policy learning---termed NDQN, and apply it to an information-seeking spoken dialogue system in the domains of restaurants and hotels. Experimental results comparing DQN (baseline) versus NDQN (proposed) using simulations report that our proposed method exhibits better scalability and is promising for optimising the behaviour of multi-domain dialogue systems.

* NIPS Workshop on Deep Reinforcement Learning, 2016 

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Deep Reinforcement Learning for Chatbots Using Clustered Actions and Human-Likeness Rewards

Aug 27, 2019
Heriberto Cuayáhuitl, Donghyeon Lee, Seonghan Ryu, Sungja Choi, Inchul Hwang, Jihie Kim

Training chatbots using the reinforcement learning paradigm is challenging due to high-dimensional states, infinite action spaces and the difficulty in specifying the reward function. We address such problems using clustered actions instead of infinite actions, and a simple but promising reward function based on human-likeness scores derived from human-human dialogue data. We train Deep Reinforcement Learning (DRL) agents using chitchat data in raw text---without any manual annotations. Experimental results using different splits of training data report the following. First, that our agents learn reasonable policies in the environments they get familiarised with, but their performance drops substantially when they are exposed to a test set of unseen dialogues. Second, that the choice of sentence embedding size between 100 and 300 dimensions is not significantly different on test data. Third, that our proposed human-likeness rewards are reasonable for training chatbots as long as they use lengthy dialogue histories of >=10 sentences.

* In International Joint Conference of Neural Networks (IJCNN), 2019 

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Ensemble-Based Deep Reinforcement Learning for Chatbots

Aug 27, 2019
Heriberto Cuayáhuitl, Donghyeon Lee, Seonghan Ryu, Yongjin Cho, Sungja Choi, Satish Indurthi, Seunghak Yu, Hyungtak Choi, Inchul Hwang, Jihie Kim

Trainable chatbots that exhibit fluent and human-like conversations remain a big challenge in artificial intelligence. Deep Reinforcement Learning (DRL) is promising for addressing this challenge, but its successful application remains an open question. This article describes a novel ensemble-based approach applied to value-based DRL chatbots, which use finite action sets as a form of meaning representation. In our approach, while dialogue actions are derived from sentence clustering, the training datasets in our ensemble are derived from dialogue clustering. The latter aim to induce specialised agents that learn to interact in a particular style. In order to facilitate neural chatbot training using our proposed approach, we assume dialogue data in raw text only -- without any manually-labelled data. Experimental results using chitchat data reveal that (1) near human-like dialogue policies can be induced, (2) generalisation to unseen data is a difficult problem, and (3) training an ensemble of chatbot agents is essential for improved performance over using a single agent. In addition to evaluations using held-out data, our results are further supported by a human evaluation that rated dialogues in terms of fluency, engagingness and consistency -- which revealed that our proposed dialogue rewards strongly correlate with human judgements.

* arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1908.10331 

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