Models, code, and papers for "Huaxiu Yao":

Transferable Neural Processes for Hyperparameter Optimization

Sep 10, 2019
Ying Wei, Peilin Zhao, Huaxiu Yao, Junzhou Huang

Automated machine learning aims to automate the whole process of machine learning, including model configuration. In this paper, we focus on automated hyperparameter optimization (HPO) based on sequential model-based optimization (SMBO). Though conventional SMBO algorithms work well when abundant HPO trials are available, they are far from satisfactory in practical applications where a trial on a huge dataset may be so costly that an optimal hyperparameter configuration is expected to return in as few trials as possible. Observing that human experts draw on their expertise in a machine learning model by trying configurations that once performed well on other datasets, we are inspired to speed up HPO by transferring knowledge from historical HPO trials on other datasets. We propose an end-to-end and efficient HPO algorithm named as Transfer Neural Processes (TNP), which achieves transfer learning by incorporating trials on other datasets, initializing the model with well-generalized parameters, and learning an initial set of hyperparameters to evaluate. Experiments on extensive OpenML datasets and three computer vision datasets show that the proposed model can achieve state-of-the-art performance in at least one order of magnitude less trials.

* 11 pages, 12 figures 

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Hierarchically Structured Meta-learning

May 13, 2019
Huaxiu Yao, Ying Wei, Junzhou Huang, Zhenhui Li

In order to learn quickly with few samples, meta-learning utilizes prior knowledge learned from previous tasks. However, a critical challenge in meta-learning is task uncertainty and heterogeneity, which can not be handled via globally sharing knowledge among tasks. In this paper, based on gradient-based meta-learning, we propose a hierarchically structured meta-learning (HSML) algorithm that explicitly tailors the transferable knowledge to different clusters of tasks. Inspired by the way human beings organize knowledge, we resort to a hierarchical task clustering structure to cluster tasks. As a result, the proposed approach not only addresses the challenge via the knowledge customization to different clusters of tasks, but also preserves knowledge generalization among a cluster of similar tasks. To tackle the changing of task relationship, in addition, we extend the hierarchical structure to a continual learning environment. The experimental results show that our approach can achieve state-of-the-art performance in both toy-regression and few-shot image classification problems.

* Accepted by ICML 2019 

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Learning from Multiple Cities: A Meta-Learning Approach for Spatial-Temporal Prediction

Jan 24, 2019
Huaxiu Yao, Yiding Liu, Ying Wei, Xianfeng Tang, Zhenhui Li

Spatial-temporal prediction is a fundamental problem for constructing smart city, which is useful for tasks such as traffic control, taxi dispatching, and environmental policy making. Due to data collection mechanism, it is common to see data collection with unbalanced spatial distributions. For example, some cities may release taxi data for multiple years while others only release a few days of data; some regions may have constant water quality data monitored by sensors whereas some regions only have a small collection of water samples. In this paper, we tackle the problem of spatial-temporal prediction for the cities with only a short period of data collection. We aim to utilize the long-period data from other cities via transfer learning. Different from previous studies that transfer knowledge from one single source city to a target city, we are the first to leverage information from multiple cities to increase the stability of transfer. Specifically, our proposed model is designed as a spatial-temporal network with a meta-learning paradigm. The meta-learning paradigm learns a well-generalized initialization of the spatial-temporal network, which can be effectively adapted to target cities. In addition, a pattern-based spatial-temporal memory is designed to distill long-term temporal information (i.e., periodicity). We conduct extensive experiments on two tasks: traffic (taxi and bike) prediction and water quality prediction. The experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed model over several competitive baseline models.

* Accepted by WWW 2019 

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Revisiting Spatial-Temporal Similarity: A Deep Learning Framework for Traffic Prediction

Nov 03, 2018
Huaxiu Yao, Xianfeng Tang, Hua Wei, Guanjie Zheng, Zhenhui Li

Traffic prediction has drawn increasing attention in AI research field due to the increasing availability of large-scale traffic data and its importance in the real world. For example, an accurate taxi demand prediction can assist taxi companies in pre-allocating taxis. The key challenge of traffic prediction lies in how to model the complex spatial dependencies and temporal dynamics. Although both factors have been considered in modeling, existing works make strong assumptions about spatial dependence and temporal dynamics, i.e., spatial dependence is stationary in time, and temporal dynamics is strictly periodical. However, in practice, the spatial dependence could be dynamic (i.e., changing from time to time), and the temporal dynamics could have some perturbation from one period to another period. In this paper, we make two important observations: (1) the spatial dependencies between locations are dynamic; and (2) the temporal dependency follows daily and weekly pattern but it is not strictly periodic for its dynamic temporal shifting. To address these two issues, we propose a novel Spatial-Temporal Dynamic Network (STDN), in which a flow gating mechanism is introduced to learn the dynamic similarity between locations, and a periodically shifted attention mechanism is designed to handle long-term periodic temporal shifting. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that tackles both issues in a unified framework. Our experimental results on real-world traffic datasets verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

* Accepted by AAAI 2019 

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Joint Modeling of Local and Global Temporal Dynamics for Multivariate Time Series Forecasting with Missing Values

Nov 22, 2019
Xianfeng Tang, Huaxiu Yao, Yiwei Sun, Charu Aggarwal, Prasenjit Mitra, Suhang Wang

Multivariate time series (MTS) forecasting is widely used in various domains, such as meteorology and traffic. Due to limitations on data collection, transmission, and storage, real-world MTS data usually contains missing values, making it infeasible to apply existing MTS forecasting models such as linear regression and recurrent neural networks. Though many efforts have been devoted to this problem, most of them solely rely on local dependencies for imputing missing values, which ignores global temporal dynamics. Local dependencies/patterns would become less useful when the missing ratio is high, or the data have consecutive missing values; while exploring global patterns can alleviate such problems. Thus, jointly modeling local and global temporal dynamics is very promising for MTS forecasting with missing values. However, work in this direction is rather limited. Therefore, we study a novel problem of MTS forecasting with missing values by jointly exploring local and global temporal dynamics. We propose a new framework LGnet, which leverages memory network to explore global patterns given estimations from local perspectives. We further introduce adversarial training to enhance the modeling of global temporal distribution. Experimental results on real-world datasets show the effectiveness of LGnet for MTS forecasting with missing values and its robustness under various missing ratios.

* Accepted by AAAI 2020 

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Robust Graph Neural Network Against Poisoning Attacks via Transfer Learning

Aug 20, 2019
Xianfeng Tang, Yandong Li, Yiwei Sun, Huaxiu Yao, Prasenjit Mitra, Suhang Wang

Graph neural networks (GNNs) are widely used in many applications. However, their robustness against adversarial attacks is criticized. Prior studies show that using unnoticeable modifications on graph topology or nodal features can significantly reduce the performances of GNNs. It is very challenging to design robust graph neural networks against poisoning attack and several efforts have been taken. Existing work aims at reducing the negative impact from adversarial edges only with the poisoned graph, which is sub-optimal since they fail to discriminate adversarial edges from normal ones. On the other hand, clean graphs from similar domains as the target poisoned graph are usually available in the real world. By perturbing these clean graphs, we create supervised knowledge to train the ability to detect adversarial edges so that the robustness of GNNs is elevated. However, such potential for clean graphs is neglected by existing work. To this end, we investigate a novel problem of improving the robustness of GNNs against poisoning attacks by exploring clean graphs. Specifically, we propose PA-GNN, which relies on a penalized aggregation mechanism that directly restrict the negative impact of adversarial edges by assigning them lower attention coefficients. To optimize PA-GNN for a poisoned graph, we design a meta-optimization algorithm that trains PA-GNN to penalize perturbations using clean graphs and their adversarial counterparts, and transfers such ability to improve the robustness of PA-GNN on the poisoned graph. Experimental results on four real-world datasets demonstrate the robustness of PA-GNN against poisoning attacks on graphs.

* Preprint, under review 

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Few-Shot Knowledge Graph Completion

Nov 26, 2019
Chuxu Zhang, Huaxiu Yao, Chao Huang, Meng Jiang, Zhenhui Li, Nitesh V. Chawla

Knowledge graphs (KGs) serve as useful resources for various natural language processing applications. Previous KG completion approaches require a large number of training instances (i.e., head-tail entity pairs) for every relation. The real case is that for most of the relations, very few entity pairs are available. Existing work of one-shot learning limits method generalizability for few-shot scenarios and does not fully use the supervisory information; however, few-shot KG completion has not been well studied yet. In this work, we propose a novel few-shot relation learning model (FSRL) that aims at discovering facts of new relations with few-shot references. FSRL can effectively capture knowledge from heterogeneous graph structure, aggregate representations of few-shot references, and match similar entity pairs of reference set for every relation. Extensive experiments on two public datasets demonstrate that FSRL outperforms the state-of-the-art.


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Joint Modeling of Dense and Incomplete Trajectories for Citywide Traffic Volume Inference

Feb 25, 2019
Xianfeng Tang, Boqing Gong, Yanwei Yu, Huaxiu Yao, Yandong Li, Haiyong Xie, Xiaoyu Wang

Real-time traffic volume inference is key to an intelligent city. It is a challenging task because accurate traffic volumes on the roads can only be measured at certain locations where sensors are installed. Moreover, the traffic evolves over time due to the influences of weather, events, holidays, etc. Existing solutions to the traffic volume inference problem often rely on dense GPS trajectories, which inevitably fail to account for the vehicles which carry no GPS devices or have them turned off. Consequently, the results are biased to taxicabs because they are almost always online for GPS tracking. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for the citywide traffic volume inference using both dense GPS trajectories and incomplete trajectories captured by camera surveillance systems. Our approach employs a high-fidelity traffic simulator and deep reinforcement learning to recover full vehicle movements from the incomplete trajectories. In order to jointly model the recovered trajectories and dense GPS trajectories, we construct spatiotemporal graphs and use multi-view graph embedding to encode the multi-hop correlations between road segments into real-valued vectors. Finally, we infer the citywide traffic volumes by propagating the traffic values of monitored road segments to the unmonitored ones through masked pairwise similarities. Extensive experiments with two big regions in a provincial capital city in China verify the effectiveness of our approach.

* Accepted by The Web Conference (WWW) 2019 

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Targeted Source Detection for Environmental Data

Aug 29, 2019
Guanjie Zheng, Mengqi Liu, Tao Wen, Hongjian Wang, Huaxiu Yao, Susan L. Brantley, Zhenhui Li

In the face of growing needs for water and energy, a fundamental understanding of the environmental impacts of human activities becomes critical for managing water and energy resources, remedying water pollution, and making regulatory policy wisely. Among activities that impact the environment, oil and gas production, wastewater transport, and urbanization are included. In addition to the occurrence of anthropogenic contamination, the presence of some contaminants (e.g., methane, salt, and sulfate) of natural origin is not uncommon. Therefore, scientists sometimes find it difficult to identify the sources of contaminants in the coupled natural and human systems. In this paper, we propose a technique to simultaneously conduct source detection and prediction, which outperforms other approaches in the interdisciplinary case study of the identification of potential groundwater contamination within a region of high-density shale gas development.

* 8 pages, 4 figures, 1 table 

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Graph Few-shot Learning via Knowledge Transfer

Oct 07, 2019
Huaxiu Yao, Chuxu Zhang, Ying Wei, Meng Jiang, Suhang Wang, Junzhou Huang, Nitesh V. Chawla, Zhenhui Li

Towards the challenging problem of semi-supervised node classification, there have been extensive studies. As a frontier, Graph Neural Networks (GNNs) have aroused great interest recently, which update the representation of each node by aggregating information of its neighbors. However, most GNNs have shallow layers with a limited receptive field and may not achieve satisfactory performance especially when the number of labeled nodes is quite small. To address this challenge, we innovatively propose a graph few-shot learning (GFL) algorithm that incorporates prior knowledge learned from auxiliary graphs to improve classification accuracy on the target graph. Specifically, a transferable metric space characterized by a node embedding and a graph-specific prototype embedding function is shared between auxiliary graphs and the target, facilitating the transfer of structural knowledge. Extensive experiments and ablation studies on four real-world graph datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed model.

* Accepted by NeurIPS 2019 GRL workshop 

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Deep Multi-View Spatial-Temporal Network for Taxi Demand Prediction

Feb 27, 2018
Huaxiu Yao, Fei Wu, Jintao Ke, Xianfeng Tang, Yitian Jia, Siyu Lu, Pinghua Gong, Jieping Ye, Zhenhui Li

Taxi demand prediction is an important building block to enabling intelligent transportation systems in a smart city. An accurate prediction model can help the city pre-allocate resources to meet travel demand and to reduce empty taxis on streets which waste energy and worsen the traffic congestion. With the increasing popularity of taxi requesting services such as Uber and Didi Chuxing (in China), we are able to collect large-scale taxi demand data continuously. How to utilize such big data to improve the demand prediction is an interesting and critical real-world problem. Traditional demand prediction methods mostly rely on time series forecasting techniques, which fail to model the complex non-linear spatial and temporal relations. Recent advances in deep learning have shown superior performance on traditionally challenging tasks such as image classification by learning the complex features and correlations from large-scale data. This breakthrough has inspired researchers to explore deep learning techniques on traffic prediction problems. However, existing methods on traffic prediction have only considered spatial relation (e.g., using CNN) or temporal relation (e.g., using LSTM) independently. We propose a Deep Multi-View Spatial-Temporal Network (DMVST-Net) framework to model both spatial and temporal relations. Specifically, our proposed model consists of three views: temporal view (modeling correlations between future demand values with near time points via LSTM), spatial view (modeling local spatial correlation via local CNN), and semantic view (modeling correlations among regions sharing similar temporal patterns). Experiments on large-scale real taxi demand data demonstrate effectiveness of our approach over state-of-the-art methods.

* AAAI 2018 paper 

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