Models, code, and papers for "Ilya Sutskever":

Neural GPUs Learn Algorithms

Mar 15, 2016
Łukasz Kaiser, Ilya Sutskever

Learning an algorithm from examples is a fundamental problem that has been widely studied. Recently it has been addressed using neural networks, in particular by Neural Turing Machines (NTMs). These are fully differentiable computers that use backpropagation to learn their own programming. Despite their appeal NTMs have a weakness that is caused by their sequential nature: they are not parallel and are are hard to train due to their large depth when unfolded. We present a neural network architecture to address this problem: the Neural GPU. It is based on a type of convolutional gated recurrent unit and, like the NTM, is computationally universal. Unlike the NTM, the Neural GPU is highly parallel which makes it easier to train and efficient to run. An essential property of algorithms is their ability to handle inputs of arbitrary size. We show that the Neural GPU can be trained on short instances of an algorithmic task and successfully generalize to long instances. We verified it on a number of tasks including long addition and long multiplication of numbers represented in binary. We train the Neural GPU on numbers with upto 20 bits and observe no errors whatsoever while testing it, even on much longer numbers. To achieve these results we introduce a technique for training deep recurrent networks: parameter sharing relaxation. We also found a small amount of dropout and gradient noise to have a large positive effect on learning and generalization.


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Reinforcement Learning Neural Turing Machines - Revised

Jan 12, 2016
Wojciech Zaremba, Ilya Sutskever

The Neural Turing Machine (NTM) is more expressive than all previously considered models because of its external memory. It can be viewed as a broader effort to use abstract external Interfaces and to learn a parametric model that interacts with them. The capabilities of a model can be extended by providing it with proper Interfaces that interact with the world. These external Interfaces include memory, a database, a search engine, or a piece of software such as a theorem verifier. Some of these Interfaces are provided by the developers of the model. However, many important existing Interfaces, such as databases and search engines, are discrete. We examine feasibility of learning models to interact with discrete Interfaces. We investigate the following discrete Interfaces: a memory Tape, an input Tape, and an output Tape. We use a Reinforcement Learning algorithm to train a neural network that interacts with such Interfaces to solve simple algorithmic tasks. Our Interfaces are expressive enough to make our model Turing complete.


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Learning to Execute

Feb 19, 2015
Wojciech Zaremba, Ilya Sutskever

Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) with Long Short-Term Memory units (LSTM) are widely used because they are expressive and are easy to train. Our interest lies in empirically evaluating the expressiveness and the learnability of LSTMs in the sequence-to-sequence regime by training them to evaluate short computer programs, a domain that has traditionally been seen as too complex for neural networks. We consider a simple class of programs that can be evaluated with a single left-to-right pass using constant memory. Our main result is that LSTMs can learn to map the character-level representations of such programs to their correct outputs. Notably, it was necessary to use curriculum learning, and while conventional curriculum learning proved ineffective, we developed a new variant of curriculum learning that improved our networks' performance in all experimental conditions. The improved curriculum had a dramatic impact on an addition problem, making it possible to train an LSTM to add two 9-digit numbers with 99% accuracy.


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Learning to Generate Reviews and Discovering Sentiment

Apr 06, 2017
Alec Radford, Rafal Jozefowicz, Ilya Sutskever

We explore the properties of byte-level recurrent language models. When given sufficient amounts of capacity, training data, and compute time, the representations learned by these models include disentangled features corresponding to high-level concepts. Specifically, we find a single unit which performs sentiment analysis. These representations, learned in an unsupervised manner, achieve state of the art on the binary subset of the Stanford Sentiment Treebank. They are also very data efficient. When using only a handful of labeled examples, our approach matches the performance of strong baselines trained on full datasets. We also demonstrate the sentiment unit has a direct influence on the generative process of the model. Simply fixing its value to be positive or negative generates samples with the corresponding positive or negative sentiment.


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Extensions and Limitations of the Neural GPU

Nov 04, 2016
Eric Price, Wojciech Zaremba, Ilya Sutskever

The Neural GPU is a recent model that can learn algorithms such as multi-digit binary addition and binary multiplication in a way that generalizes to inputs of arbitrary length. We show that there are two simple ways of improving the performance of the Neural GPU: by carefully designing a curriculum, and by increasing model size. The latter requires a memory efficient implementation, as a naive implementation of the Neural GPU is memory intensive. We find that these techniques increase the set of algorithmic problems that can be solved by the Neural GPU: we have been able to learn to perform all the arithmetic operations (and generalize to arbitrarily long numbers) when the arguments are given in the decimal representation (which, surprisingly, has not been possible before). We have also been able to train the Neural GPU to evaluate long arithmetic expressions with multiple operands that require respecting the precedence order of the operands, although these have succeeded only in their binary representation, and not with perfect accuracy. In addition, we gain insight into the Neural GPU by investigating its failure modes. We find that Neural GPUs that correctly generalize to arbitrarily long numbers still fail to compute the correct answer on highly-symmetric, atypical inputs: for example, a Neural GPU that achieves near-perfect generalization on decimal multiplication of up to 100-digit long numbers can fail on $000000\dots002 \times 000000\dots002$ while succeeding at $2 \times 2$. These failure modes are reminiscent of adversarial examples.


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Neural Random-Access Machines

Feb 09, 2016
Karol Kurach, Marcin Andrychowicz, Ilya Sutskever

In this paper, we propose and investigate a new neural network architecture called Neural Random Access Machine. It can manipulate and dereference pointers to an external variable-size random-access memory. The model is trained from pure input-output examples using backpropagation. We evaluate the new model on a number of simple algorithmic tasks whose solutions require pointer manipulation and dereferencing. Our results show that the proposed model can learn to solve algorithmic tasks of such type and is capable of operating on simple data structures like linked-lists and binary trees. For easier tasks, the learned solutions generalize to sequences of arbitrary length. Moreover, memory access during inference can be done in a constant time under some assumptions.

* ICLR submission, 17 pages, 9 figures, 6 tables (with bibliography and appendix) 

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Recurrent Neural Network Regularization

Feb 19, 2015
Wojciech Zaremba, Ilya Sutskever, Oriol Vinyals

We present a simple regularization technique for Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) with Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) units. Dropout, the most successful technique for regularizing neural networks, does not work well with RNNs and LSTMs. In this paper, we show how to correctly apply dropout to LSTMs, and show that it substantially reduces overfitting on a variety of tasks. These tasks include language modeling, speech recognition, image caption generation, and machine translation.


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Learning Factored Representations in a Deep Mixture of Experts

Mar 09, 2014
David Eigen, Marc'Aurelio Ranzato, Ilya Sutskever

Mixtures of Experts combine the outputs of several "expert" networks, each of which specializes in a different part of the input space. This is achieved by training a "gating" network that maps each input to a distribution over the experts. Such models show promise for building larger networks that are still cheap to compute at test time, and more parallelizable at training time. In this this work, we extend the Mixture of Experts to a stacked model, the Deep Mixture of Experts, with multiple sets of gating and experts. This exponentially increases the number of effective experts by associating each input with a combination of experts at each layer, yet maintains a modest model size. On a randomly translated version of the MNIST dataset, we find that the Deep Mixture of Experts automatically learns to develop location-dependent ("where") experts at the first layer, and class-specific ("what") experts at the second layer. In addition, we see that the different combinations are in use when the model is applied to a dataset of speech monophones. These demonstrate effective use of all expert combinations.


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Estimating the Hessian by Back-propagating Curvature

Sep 04, 2012
James Martens, Ilya Sutskever, Kevin Swersky

In this work we develop Curvature Propagation (CP), a general technique for efficiently computing unbiased approximations of the Hessian of any function that is computed using a computational graph. At the cost of roughly two gradient evaluations, CP can give a rank-1 approximation of the whole Hessian, and can be repeatedly applied to give increasingly precise unbiased estimates of any or all of the entries of the Hessian. Of particular interest is the diagonal of the Hessian, for which no general approach is known to exist that is both efficient and accurate. We show in experiments that CP turns out to work well in practice, giving very accurate estimates of the Hessian of neural networks, for example, with a relatively small amount of work. We also apply CP to Score Matching, where a diagonal of a Hessian plays an integral role in the Score Matching objective, and where it is usually computed exactly using inefficient algorithms which do not scale to larger and more complex models.

* Appears in Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML 2012) 

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Third-Person Imitation Learning

Mar 06, 2017
Bradly C. Stadie, Pieter Abbeel, Ilya Sutskever

Reinforcement learning (RL) makes it possible to train agents capable of achiev- ing sophisticated goals in complex and uncertain environments. A key difficulty in reinforcement learning is specifying a reward function for the agent to optimize. Traditionally, imitation learning in RL has been used to overcome this problem. Unfortunately, hitherto imitation learning methods tend to require that demonstra- tions are supplied in the first-person: the agent is provided with a sequence of states and a specification of the actions that it should have taken. While powerful, this kind of imitation learning is limited by the relatively hard problem of collect- ing first-person demonstrations. Humans address this problem by learning from third-person demonstrations: they observe other humans perform tasks, infer the task, and accomplish the same task themselves. In this paper, we present a method for unsupervised third-person imitation learn- ing. Here third-person refers to training an agent to correctly achieve a simple goal in a simple environment when it is provided a demonstration of a teacher achieving the same goal but from a different viewpoint; and unsupervised refers to the fact that the agent receives only these third-person demonstrations, and is not provided a correspondence between teacher states and student states. Our methods primary insight is that recent advances from domain confusion can be utilized to yield domain agnostic features which are crucial during the training process. To validate our approach, we report successful experiments on learning from third-person demonstrations in a pointmass domain, a reacher domain, and inverted pendulum.


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Neural Programmer: Inducing Latent Programs with Gradient Descent

Aug 04, 2016
Arvind Neelakantan, Quoc V. Le, Ilya Sutskever

Deep neural networks have achieved impressive supervised classification performance in many tasks including image recognition, speech recognition, and sequence to sequence learning. However, this success has not been translated to applications like question answering that may involve complex arithmetic and logic reasoning. A major limitation of these models is in their inability to learn even simple arithmetic and logic operations. For example, it has been shown that neural networks fail to learn to add two binary numbers reliably. In this work, we propose Neural Programmer, an end-to-end differentiable neural network augmented with a small set of basic arithmetic and logic operations. Neural Programmer can call these augmented operations over several steps, thereby inducing compositional programs that are more complex than the built-in operations. The model learns from a weak supervision signal which is the result of execution of the correct program, hence it does not require expensive annotation of the correct program itself. The decisions of what operations to call, and what data segments to apply to are inferred by Neural Programmer. Such decisions, during training, are done in a differentiable fashion so that the entire network can be trained jointly by gradient descent. We find that training the model is difficult, but it can be greatly improved by adding random noise to the gradient. On a fairly complex synthetic table-comprehension dataset, traditional recurrent networks and attentional models perform poorly while Neural Programmer typically obtains nearly perfect accuracy.

* Accepted as a conference paper at ICLR 2015 

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Sequence to Sequence Learning with Neural Networks

Dec 14, 2014
Ilya Sutskever, Oriol Vinyals, Quoc V. Le

Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) are powerful models that have achieved excellent performance on difficult learning tasks. Although DNNs work well whenever large labeled training sets are available, they cannot be used to map sequences to sequences. In this paper, we present a general end-to-end approach to sequence learning that makes minimal assumptions on the sequence structure. Our method uses a multilayered Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) to map the input sequence to a vector of a fixed dimensionality, and then another deep LSTM to decode the target sequence from the vector. Our main result is that on an English to French translation task from the WMT'14 dataset, the translations produced by the LSTM achieve a BLEU score of 34.8 on the entire test set, where the LSTM's BLEU score was penalized on out-of-vocabulary words. Additionally, the LSTM did not have difficulty on long sentences. For comparison, a phrase-based SMT system achieves a BLEU score of 33.3 on the same dataset. When we used the LSTM to rerank the 1000 hypotheses produced by the aforementioned SMT system, its BLEU score increases to 36.5, which is close to the previous best result on this task. The LSTM also learned sensible phrase and sentence representations that are sensitive to word order and are relatively invariant to the active and the passive voice. Finally, we found that reversing the order of the words in all source sentences (but not target sentences) improved the LSTM's performance markedly, because doing so introduced many short term dependencies between the source and the target sentence which made the optimization problem easier.

* 9 pages 

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Exploiting Similarities among Languages for Machine Translation

Sep 17, 2013
Tomas Mikolov, Quoc V. Le, Ilya Sutskever

Dictionaries and phrase tables are the basis of modern statistical machine translation systems. This paper develops a method that can automate the process of generating and extending dictionaries and phrase tables. Our method can translate missing word and phrase entries by learning language structures based on large monolingual data and mapping between languages from small bilingual data. It uses distributed representation of words and learns a linear mapping between vector spaces of languages. Despite its simplicity, our method is surprisingly effective: we can achieve almost 90% precision@5 for translation of words between English and Spanish. This method makes little assumption about the languages, so it can be used to extend and refine dictionaries and translation tables for any language pairs.


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Generating Long Sequences with Sparse Transformers

Apr 23, 2019
Rewon Child, Scott Gray, Alec Radford, Ilya Sutskever

Transformers are powerful sequence models, but require time and memory that grows quadratically with the sequence length. In this paper we introduce sparse factorizations of the attention matrix which reduce this to $O(n \sqrt{n})$. We also introduce a) a variation on architecture and initialization to train deeper networks, b) the recomputation of attention matrices to save memory, and c) fast attention kernels for training. We call networks with these changes Sparse Transformers, and show they can model sequences tens of thousands of timesteps long using hundreds of layers. We use the same architecture to model images, audio, and text from raw bytes, setting a new state of the art for density modeling of Enwik8, CIFAR-10, and ImageNet-64. We generate unconditional samples that demonstrate global coherence and great diversity, and show it is possible in principle to use self-attention to model sequences of length one million or more.


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GamePad: A Learning Environment for Theorem Proving

Jun 02, 2018
Daniel Huang, Prafulla Dhariwal, Dawn Song, Ilya Sutskever

In this paper, we introduce a system called GamePad that can be used to explore the application of machine learning methods to theorem proving in the Coq proof assistant. Interactive theorem provers such as Coq enable users to construct machine-checkable proofs in a step-by-step manner. Hence, they provide an opportunity to explore theorem proving at a human level of abstraction. We use GamePad to synthesize proofs for a simple algebraic rewrite problem and train baseline models for a formalization of the Feit-Thompson theorem. We address position evaluation (i.e., predict the number of proof steps left) and tactic prediction (i.e., predict the next proof step) tasks, which arise naturally in human-level theorem proving.


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Continuous Deep Q-Learning with Model-based Acceleration

Mar 02, 2016
Shixiang Gu, Timothy Lillicrap, Ilya Sutskever, Sergey Levine

Model-free reinforcement learning has been successfully applied to a range of challenging problems, and has recently been extended to handle large neural network policies and value functions. However, the sample complexity of model-free algorithms, particularly when using high-dimensional function approximators, tends to limit their applicability to physical systems. In this paper, we explore algorithms and representations to reduce the sample complexity of deep reinforcement learning for continuous control tasks. We propose two complementary techniques for improving the efficiency of such algorithms. First, we derive a continuous variant of the Q-learning algorithm, which we call normalized adantage functions (NAF), as an alternative to the more commonly used policy gradient and actor-critic methods. NAF representation allows us to apply Q-learning with experience replay to continuous tasks, and substantially improves performance on a set of simulated robotic control tasks. To further improve the efficiency of our approach, we explore the use of learned models for accelerating model-free reinforcement learning. We show that iteratively refitted local linear models are especially effective for this, and demonstrate substantially faster learning on domains where such models are applicable.


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MuProp: Unbiased Backpropagation for Stochastic Neural Networks

Feb 25, 2016
Shixiang Gu, Sergey Levine, Ilya Sutskever, Andriy Mnih

Deep neural networks are powerful parametric models that can be trained efficiently using the backpropagation algorithm. Stochastic neural networks combine the power of large parametric functions with that of graphical models, which makes it possible to learn very complex distributions. However, as backpropagation is not directly applicable to stochastic networks that include discrete sampling operations within their computational graph, training such networks remains difficult. We present MuProp, an unbiased gradient estimator for stochastic networks, designed to make this task easier. MuProp improves on the likelihood-ratio estimator by reducing its variance using a control variate based on the first-order Taylor expansion of a mean-field network. Crucially, unlike prior attempts at using backpropagation for training stochastic networks, the resulting estimator is unbiased and well behaved. Our experiments on structured output prediction and discrete latent variable modeling demonstrate that MuProp yields consistently good performance across a range of difficult tasks.

* Published as a conference paper at ICLR 2016 

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Learning Online Alignments with Continuous Rewards Policy Gradient

Aug 03, 2016
Yuping Luo, Chung-Cheng Chiu, Navdeep Jaitly, Ilya Sutskever

Sequence-to-sequence models with soft attention had significant success in machine translation, speech recognition, and question answering. Though capable and easy to use, they require that the entirety of the input sequence is available at the beginning of inference, an assumption that is not valid for instantaneous translation and speech recognition. To address this problem, we present a new method for solving sequence-to-sequence problems using hard online alignments instead of soft offline alignments. The online alignments model is able to start producing outputs without the need to first process the entire input sequence. A highly accurate online sequence-to-sequence model is useful because it can be used to build an accurate voice-based instantaneous translator. Our model uses hard binary stochastic decisions to select the timesteps at which outputs will be produced. The model is trained to produce these stochastic decisions using a standard policy gradient method. In our experiments, we show that this model achieves encouraging performance on TIMIT and Wall Street Journal (WSJ) speech recognition datasets.


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Move Evaluation in Go Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

Apr 10, 2015
Chris J. Maddison, Aja Huang, Ilya Sutskever, David Silver

The game of Go is more challenging than other board games, due to the difficulty of constructing a position or move evaluation function. In this paper we investigate whether deep convolutional networks can be used to directly represent and learn this knowledge. We train a large 12-layer convolutional neural network by supervised learning from a database of human professional games. The network correctly predicts the expert move in 55% of positions, equalling the accuracy of a 6 dan human player. When the trained convolutional network was used directly to play games of Go, without any search, it beat the traditional search program GnuGo in 97% of games, and matched the performance of a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo tree search that simulates a million positions per move.

* Minor edits and included captures in Figure 2 

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Emergent Complexity via Multi-Agent Competition

Mar 14, 2018
Trapit Bansal, Jakub Pachocki, Szymon Sidor, Ilya Sutskever, Igor Mordatch

Reinforcement learning algorithms can train agents that solve problems in complex, interesting environments. Normally, the complexity of the trained agent is closely related to the complexity of the environment. This suggests that a highly capable agent requires a complex environment for training. In this paper, we point out that a competitive multi-agent environment trained with self-play can produce behaviors that are far more complex than the environment itself. We also point out that such environments come with a natural curriculum, because for any skill level, an environment full of agents of this level will have the right level of difficulty. This work introduces several competitive multi-agent environments where agents compete in a 3D world with simulated physics. The trained agents learn a wide variety of complex and interesting skills, even though the environment themselves are relatively simple. The skills include behaviors such as running, blocking, ducking, tackling, fooling opponents, kicking, and defending using both arms and legs. A highlight of the learned behaviors can be found here: https://goo.gl/eR7fbX

* Published as a conference paper at ICLR 2018 

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