Research papers and code for "Jean-Roch Vlimant":
We present a lightweight Python framework for distributed training of neural networks on multiple GPUs or CPUs. The framework is built on the popular Keras machine learning library. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocol is used to coordinate the training process, and the system is well suited for job submission at supercomputing sites. We detail the software's features, describe its use, and demonstrate its performance on systems of varying sizes on a benchmark problem drawn from high-energy physics research.

* 4 pages, 4 figures, 1 table, DS@HEP, SC17
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Using variational autoencoders trained on known physics processes, we develop a one-side p-value test to isolate previously unseen processes as outlier events. Since the autoencoder training does not depend on any specific new physics signature, the proposed procedure has a weak dependence on underlying assumptions about the nature of new physics. An event selection based on this algorithm would be complementary to classic LHC searches, typically based on model-dependent hypothesis testing. Such an algorithm would deliver a list of anomalous events, that the experimental collaborations could further scrutinize and even release as a catalog, similarly to what is typically done in other scientific domains. Repeated patterns in this dataset could motivate new scenarios for beyond-the-standard-model physics and inspire new searches, to be performed on future data with traditional supervised approaches. Running in the trigger system of the LHC experiments, such an application could identify anomalous events that would be otherwise lost, extending the scientific reach of the LHC.

* 17 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables
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We show how event topology classification based on deep learning could be used to improve the purity of data samples selected in real time at at the Large Hadron Collider. We consider different data representations, on which different kinds of multi-class classifiers are trained. Both raw data and high-level features are utilized. In the considered examples, a filter based on the classifier's score can be trained to retain ~99% of the interesting events and reduce the false-positive rate by as much as one order of magnitude for certain background processes. By operating such a filter as part of the online event selection infrastructure of the LHC experiments, one could benefit from a more flexible and inclusive selection strategy while reducing the amount of downstream resources wasted in processing false positives. The saved resources could be translated into a reduction of the detector operation cost or into an effective increase of storage and processing capabilities, which could be reinvested to extend the physics reach of the LHC experiments.

* 15 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables
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Machine Learning in High Energy Physics Community White Paper
Jul 08, 2018
Kim Albertsson, Piero Altoe, Dustin Anderson, Michael Andrews, Juan Pedro Araque Espinosa, Adam Aurisano, Laurent Basara, Adrian Bevan, Wahid Bhimji, Daniele Bonacorsi, Paolo Calafiura, Mario Campanelli, Louis Capps, Federico Carminati, Stefano Carrazza, Taylor Childers, Elias Coniavitis, Kyle Cranmer, Claire David, Douglas Davis, Javier Duarte, Martin Erdmann, Jonas Eschle, Amir Farbin, Matthew Feickert, Nuno Filipe Castro, Conor Fitzpatrick, Michele Floris, Alessandra Forti, Jordi Garra-Tico, Jochen Gemmler, Maria Girone, Paul Glaysher, Sergei Gleyzer, Vladimir Gligorov, Tobias Golling, Jonas Graw, Lindsey Gray, Dick Greenwood, Thomas Hacker, John Harvey, Benedikt Hegner, Lukas Heinrich, Ben Hooberman, Johannes Junggeburth, Michael Kagan, Meghan Kane, Konstantin Kanishchev, Przemysław Karpiński, Zahari Kassabov, Gaurav Kaul, Dorian Kcira, Thomas Keck, Alexei Klimentov, Jim Kowalkowski, Luke Kreczko, Alexander Kurepin, Rob Kutschke, Valentin Kuznetsov, Nicolas Köhler, Igor Lakomov, Kevin Lannon, Mario Lassnig, Antonio Limosani, Gilles Louppe, Aashrita Mangu, Pere Mato, Narain Meenakshi, Helge Meinhard, Dario Menasce, Lorenzo Moneta, Seth Moortgat, Mark Neubauer, Harvey Newman, Hans Pabst, Michela Paganini, Manfred Paulini, Gabriel Perdue, Uzziel Perez, Attilio Picazio, Jim Pivarski, Harrison Prosper, Fernanda Psihas, Alexander Radovic, Ryan Reece, Aurelius Rinkevicius, Eduardo Rodrigues, Jamal Rorie, David Rousseau, Aaron Sauers, Steven Schramm, Ariel Schwartzman, Horst Severini, Paul Seyfert, Filip Siroky, Konstantin Skazytkin, Mike Sokoloff, Graeme Stewart, Bob Stienen, Ian Stockdale, Giles Strong, Savannah Thais, Karen Tomko, Eli Upfal, Emanuele Usai, Andrey Ustyuzhanin, Martin Vala, Sofia Vallecorsa, Mauro Verzetti, Xavier Vilasís-Cardona, Jean-Roch Vlimant, Ilija Vukotic, Sean-Jiun Wang, Gordon Watts, Michael Williams, Wenjing Wu, Stefan Wunsch, Omar Zapata

Machine learning is an important research area in particle physics, beginning with applications to high-level physics analysis in the 1990s and 2000s, followed by an explosion of applications in particle and event identification and reconstruction in the 2010s. In this document we discuss promising future research and development areas in machine learning in particle physics with a roadmap for their implementation, software and hardware resource requirements, collaborative initiatives with the data science community, academia and industry, and training the particle physics community in data science. The main objective of the document is to connect and motivate these areas of research and development with the physics drivers of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider and future neutrino experiments and identify the resource needs for their implementation. Additionally we identify areas where collaboration with external communities will be of great benefit.

* Editors: Sergei Gleyzer, Paul Seyfert and Steven Schramm
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