Models, code, and papers for "Jeff Donahue":

Large Scale Adversarial Representation Learning

Jul 04, 2019
Jeff Donahue, Karen Simonyan

Adversarially trained generative models (GANs) have recently achieved compelling image synthesis results. But despite early successes in using GANs for unsupervised representation learning, they have since been superseded by approaches based on self-supervision. In this work we show that progress in image generation quality translates to substantially improved representation learning performance. Our approach, BigBiGAN, builds upon the state-of-the-art BigGAN model, extending it to representation learning by adding an encoder and modifying the discriminator. We extensively evaluate the representation learning and generation capabilities of these BigBiGAN models, demonstrating that these generation-based models achieve the state of the art in unsupervised representation learning on ImageNet, as well as in unconditional image generation.


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Efficient Video Generation on Complex Datasets

Jul 15, 2019
Aidan Clark, Jeff Donahue, Karen Simonyan

Generative models of natural images have progressed towards high fidelity samples by the strong leveraging of scale. We attempt to carry this success to the field of video modeling by showing that large Generative Adversarial Networks trained on the complex Kinetics-600 dataset are able to produce video samples of substantially higher complexity than previous work. Our proposed network, Dual Video Discriminator GAN (DVD-GAN), scales to longer and higher resolution videos by leveraging a computationally efficient decomposition of its discriminator. We evaluate on the related tasks of video synthesis and video prediction, and achieve new state of the art Frechet Inception Distance on prediction for Kinetics-600, as well as state of the art Inception Score for synthesis on the UCF-101 dataset, alongside establishing a number of strong baselines on Kinetics-600.


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Large Scale GAN Training for High Fidelity Natural Image Synthesis

Sep 28, 2018
Andrew Brock, Jeff Donahue, Karen Simonyan

Despite recent progress in generative image modeling, successfully generating high-resolution, diverse samples from complex datasets such as ImageNet remains an elusive goal. To this end, we train Generative Adversarial Networks at the largest scale yet attempted, and study the instabilities specific to such scale. We find that applying orthogonal regularization to the generator renders it amenable to a simple "truncation trick", allowing fine control over the trade-off between sample fidelity and variety by truncating the latent space. Our modifications lead to models which set the new state of the art in class-conditional image synthesis. When trained on ImageNet at 128x128 resolution, our models (BigGANs) achieve an Inception Score (IS) of 166.3 and Frechet Inception Distance (FID) of 9.6, improving over the previous best IS of 52.52 and FID of 18.65.


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Adversarial Feature Learning

Apr 03, 2017
Jeff Donahue, Philipp Krähenbühl, Trevor Darrell

The ability of the Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) framework to learn generative models mapping from simple latent distributions to arbitrarily complex data distributions has been demonstrated empirically, with compelling results showing that the latent space of such generators captures semantic variation in the data distribution. Intuitively, models trained to predict these semantic latent representations given data may serve as useful feature representations for auxiliary problems where semantics are relevant. However, in their existing form, GANs have no means of learning the inverse mapping -- projecting data back into the latent space. We propose Bidirectional Generative Adversarial Networks (BiGANs) as a means of learning this inverse mapping, and demonstrate that the resulting learned feature representation is useful for auxiliary supervised discrimination tasks, competitive with contemporary approaches to unsupervised and self-supervised feature learning.

* Published as a conference paper at ICLR 2017. Changelog: (v7) Table 2 results improved 1-2% due to averaging predictions over 10 crops at test time, as done in Noroozi & Favaro; Table 3 VOC classification results slightly improved due to minor bugfix. (See v6 changelog for previous versions.) 

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Data-dependent Initializations of Convolutional Neural Networks

Sep 22, 2016
Philipp Krähenbühl, Carl Doersch, Jeff Donahue, Trevor Darrell

Convolutional Neural Networks spread through computer vision like a wildfire, impacting almost all visual tasks imaginable. Despite this, few researchers dare to train their models from scratch. Most work builds on one of a handful of ImageNet pre-trained models, and fine-tunes or adapts these for specific tasks. This is in large part due to the difficulty of properly initializing these networks from scratch. A small miscalibration of the initial weights leads to vanishing or exploding gradients, as well as poor convergence properties. In this work we present a fast and simple data-dependent initialization procedure, that sets the weights of a network such that all units in the network train at roughly the same rate, avoiding vanishing or exploding gradients. Our initialization matches the current state-of-the-art unsupervised or self-supervised pre-training methods on standard computer vision tasks, such as image classification and object detection, while being roughly three orders of magnitude faster. When combined with pre-training methods, our initialization significantly outperforms prior work, narrowing the gap between supervised and unsupervised pre-training.

* ICLR 2016 

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Rich feature hierarchies for accurate object detection and semantic segmentation

Oct 22, 2014
Ross Girshick, Jeff Donahue, Trevor Darrell, Jitendra Malik

Object detection performance, as measured on the canonical PASCAL VOC dataset, has plateaued in the last few years. The best-performing methods are complex ensemble systems that typically combine multiple low-level image features with high-level context. In this paper, we propose a simple and scalable detection algorithm that improves mean average precision (mAP) by more than 30% relative to the previous best result on VOC 2012---achieving a mAP of 53.3%. Our approach combines two key insights: (1) one can apply high-capacity convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to bottom-up region proposals in order to localize and segment objects and (2) when labeled training data is scarce, supervised pre-training for an auxiliary task, followed by domain-specific fine-tuning, yields a significant performance boost. Since we combine region proposals with CNNs, we call our method R-CNN: Regions with CNN features. We also compare R-CNN to OverFeat, a recently proposed sliding-window detector based on a similar CNN architecture. We find that R-CNN outperforms OverFeat by a large margin on the 200-class ILSVRC2013 detection dataset. Source code for the complete system is available at http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~rbg/rcnn.

* Extended version of our CVPR 2014 paper; latest update (v5) includes results using deeper networks (see Appendix G. Changelog) 

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Part-based R-CNNs for Fine-grained Category Detection

Jul 15, 2014
Ning Zhang, Jeff Donahue, Ross Girshick, Trevor Darrell

Semantic part localization can facilitate fine-grained categorization by explicitly isolating subtle appearance differences associated with specific object parts. Methods for pose-normalized representations have been proposed, but generally presume bounding box annotations at test time due to the difficulty of object detection. We propose a model for fine-grained categorization that overcomes these limitations by leveraging deep convolutional features computed on bottom-up region proposals. Our method learns whole-object and part detectors, enforces learned geometric constraints between them, and predicts a fine-grained category from a pose-normalized representation. Experiments on the Caltech-UCSD bird dataset confirm that our method outperforms state-of-the-art fine-grained categorization methods in an end-to-end evaluation without requiring a bounding box at test time.

* 16 pages. To appear at European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV), 2014 

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Context Encoders: Feature Learning by Inpainting

Nov 21, 2016
Deepak Pathak, Philipp Krahenbuhl, Jeff Donahue, Trevor Darrell, Alexei A. Efros

We present an unsupervised visual feature learning algorithm driven by context-based pixel prediction. By analogy with auto-encoders, we propose Context Encoders -- a convolutional neural network trained to generate the contents of an arbitrary image region conditioned on its surroundings. In order to succeed at this task, context encoders need to both understand the content of the entire image, as well as produce a plausible hypothesis for the missing part(s). When training context encoders, we have experimented with both a standard pixel-wise reconstruction loss, as well as a reconstruction plus an adversarial loss. The latter produces much sharper results because it can better handle multiple modes in the output. We found that a context encoder learns a representation that captures not just appearance but also the semantics of visual structures. We quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of our learned features for CNN pre-training on classification, detection, and segmentation tasks. Furthermore, context encoders can be used for semantic inpainting tasks, either stand-alone or as initialization for non-parametric methods.

* CVPR 2016 
* New results on ImageNet Generation 

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Towards Adapting ImageNet to Reality: Scalable Domain Adaptation with Implicit Low-rank Transformations

Aug 20, 2013
Erik Rodner, Judy Hoffman, Jeff Donahue, Trevor Darrell, Kate Saenko

Images seen during test time are often not from the same distribution as images used for learning. This problem, known as domain shift, occurs when training classifiers from object-centric internet image databases and trying to apply them directly to scene understanding tasks. The consequence is often severe performance degradation and is one of the major barriers for the application of classifiers in real-world systems. In this paper, we show how to learn transform-based domain adaptation classifiers in a scalable manner. The key idea is to exploit an implicit rank constraint, originated from a max-margin domain adaptation formulation, to make optimization tractable. Experiments show that the transformation between domains can be very efficiently learned from data and easily applied to new categories. This begins to bridge the gap between large-scale internet image collections and object images captured in everyday life environments.


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Efficient Learning of Domain-invariant Image Representations

Apr 09, 2013
Judy Hoffman, Erik Rodner, Jeff Donahue, Trevor Darrell, Kate Saenko

We present an algorithm that learns representations which explicitly compensate for domain mismatch and which can be efficiently realized as linear classifiers. Specifically, we form a linear transformation that maps features from the target (test) domain to the source (training) domain as part of training the classifier. We optimize both the transformation and classifier parameters jointly, and introduce an efficient cost function based on misclassification loss. Our method combines several features previously unavailable in a single algorithm: multi-class adaptation through representation learning, ability to map across heterogeneous feature spaces, and scalability to large datasets. We present experiments on several image datasets that demonstrate improved accuracy and computational advantages compared to previous approaches.

* ICLR 2013 

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Sequence to Sequence -- Video to Text

Oct 19, 2015
Subhashini Venugopalan, Marcus Rohrbach, Jeff Donahue, Raymond Mooney, Trevor Darrell, Kate Saenko

Real-world videos often have complex dynamics; and methods for generating open-domain video descriptions should be sensitive to temporal structure and allow both input (sequence of frames) and output (sequence of words) of variable length. To approach this problem, we propose a novel end-to-end sequence-to-sequence model to generate captions for videos. For this we exploit recurrent neural networks, specifically LSTMs, which have demonstrated state-of-the-art performance in image caption generation. Our LSTM model is trained on video-sentence pairs and learns to associate a sequence of video frames to a sequence of words in order to generate a description of the event in the video clip. Our model naturally is able to learn the temporal structure of the sequence of frames as well as the sequence model of the generated sentences, i.e. a language model. We evaluate several variants of our model that exploit different visual features on a standard set of YouTube videos and two movie description datasets (M-VAD and MPII-MD).

* ICCV 2015 camera-ready. Includes code, project page and LSMDC challenge results 

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Translating Videos to Natural Language Using Deep Recurrent Neural Networks

Apr 30, 2015
Subhashini Venugopalan, Huijuan Xu, Jeff Donahue, Marcus Rohrbach, Raymond Mooney, Kate Saenko

Solving the visual symbol grounding problem has long been a goal of artificial intelligence. The field appears to be advancing closer to this goal with recent breakthroughs in deep learning for natural language grounding in static images. In this paper, we propose to translate videos directly to sentences using a unified deep neural network with both convolutional and recurrent structure. Described video datasets are scarce, and most existing methods have been applied to toy domains with a small vocabulary of possible words. By transferring knowledge from 1.2M+ images with category labels and 100,000+ images with captions, our method is able to create sentence descriptions of open-domain videos with large vocabularies. We compare our approach with recent work using language generation metrics, subject, verb, and object prediction accuracy, and a human evaluation.

* NAACL-HLT 2015 camera ready 

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One-Shot Adaptation of Supervised Deep Convolutional Models

Feb 18, 2014
Judy Hoffman, Eric Tzeng, Jeff Donahue, Yangqing Jia, Kate Saenko, Trevor Darrell

Dataset bias remains a significant barrier towards solving real world computer vision tasks. Though deep convolutional networks have proven to be a competitive approach for image classification, a question remains: have these models have solved the dataset bias problem? In general, training or fine-tuning a state-of-the-art deep model on a new domain requires a significant amount of data, which for many applications is simply not available. Transfer of models directly to new domains without adaptation has historically led to poor recognition performance. In this paper, we pose the following question: is a single image dataset, much larger than previously explored for adaptation, comprehensive enough to learn general deep models that may be effectively applied to new image domains? In other words, are deep CNNs trained on large amounts of labeled data as susceptible to dataset bias as previous methods have been shown to be? We show that a generic supervised deep CNN model trained on a large dataset reduces, but does not remove, dataset bias. Furthermore, we propose several methods for adaptation with deep models that are able to operate with little (one example per category) or no labeled domain specific data. Our experiments show that adaptation of deep models on benchmark visual domain adaptation datasets can provide a significant performance boost.

* ICLR Workshop 2014 

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Generating Visual Explanations

Mar 28, 2016
Lisa Anne Hendricks, Zeynep Akata, Marcus Rohrbach, Jeff Donahue, Bernt Schiele, Trevor Darrell

Clearly explaining a rationale for a classification decision to an end-user can be as important as the decision itself. Existing approaches for deep visual recognition are generally opaque and do not output any justification text; contemporary vision-language models can describe image content but fail to take into account class-discriminative image aspects which justify visual predictions. We propose a new model that focuses on the discriminating properties of the visible object, jointly predicts a class label, and explains why the predicted label is appropriate for the image. We propose a novel loss function based on sampling and reinforcement learning that learns to generate sentences that realize a global sentence property, such as class specificity. Our results on a fine-grained bird species classification dataset show that our model is able to generate explanations which are not only consistent with an image but also more discriminative than descriptions produced by existing captioning methods.


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Visual Search at Pinterest

Mar 08, 2017
Yushi Jing, David Liu, Dmitry Kislyuk, Andrew Zhai, Jiajing Xu, Jeff Donahue, Sarah Tavel

We demonstrate that, with the availability of distributed computation platforms such as Amazon Web Services and open-source tools, it is possible for a small engineering team to build, launch and maintain a cost-effective, large-scale visual search system with widely available tools. We also demonstrate, through a comprehensive set of live experiments at Pinterest, that content recommendation powered by visual search improve user engagement. By sharing our implementation details and the experiences learned from launching a commercial visual search engines from scratch, we hope visual search are more widely incorporated into today's commercial applications.

* in Proceedings of the 21th ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge and Discovery and Data Mining, 2015 

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DeCAF: A Deep Convolutional Activation Feature for Generic Visual Recognition

Oct 06, 2013
Jeff Donahue, Yangqing Jia, Oriol Vinyals, Judy Hoffman, Ning Zhang, Eric Tzeng, Trevor Darrell

We evaluate whether features extracted from the activation of a deep convolutional network trained in a fully supervised fashion on a large, fixed set of object recognition tasks can be re-purposed to novel generic tasks. Our generic tasks may differ significantly from the originally trained tasks and there may be insufficient labeled or unlabeled data to conventionally train or adapt a deep architecture to the new tasks. We investigate and visualize the semantic clustering of deep convolutional features with respect to a variety of such tasks, including scene recognition, domain adaptation, and fine-grained recognition challenges. We compare the efficacy of relying on various network levels to define a fixed feature, and report novel results that significantly outperform the state-of-the-art on several important vision challenges. We are releasing DeCAF, an open-source implementation of these deep convolutional activation features, along with all associated network parameters to enable vision researchers to be able to conduct experimentation with deep representations across a range of visual concept learning paradigms.


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Long-term Recurrent Convolutional Networks for Visual Recognition and Description

May 31, 2016
Jeff Donahue, Lisa Anne Hendricks, Marcus Rohrbach, Subhashini Venugopalan, Sergio Guadarrama, Kate Saenko, Trevor Darrell

Models based on deep convolutional networks have dominated recent image interpretation tasks; we investigate whether models which are also recurrent, or "temporally deep", are effective for tasks involving sequences, visual and otherwise. We develop a novel recurrent convolutional architecture suitable for large-scale visual learning which is end-to-end trainable, and demonstrate the value of these models on benchmark video recognition tasks, image description and retrieval problems, and video narration challenges. In contrast to current models which assume a fixed spatio-temporal receptive field or simple temporal averaging for sequential processing, recurrent convolutional models are "doubly deep"' in that they can be compositional in spatial and temporal "layers". Such models may have advantages when target concepts are complex and/or training data are limited. Learning long-term dependencies is possible when nonlinearities are incorporated into the network state updates. Long-term RNN models are appealing in that they directly can map variable-length inputs (e.g., video frames) to variable length outputs (e.g., natural language text) and can model complex temporal dynamics; yet they can be optimized with backpropagation. Our recurrent long-term models are directly connected to modern visual convnet models and can be jointly trained to simultaneously learn temporal dynamics and convolutional perceptual representations. Our results show such models have distinct advantages over state-of-the-art models for recognition or generation which are separately defined and/or optimized.

* Originally presented at CVPR 2015 (oral). Updated version (accepted as a TPAMI journal article) includes additional results 

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LSDA: Large Scale Detection Through Adaptation

Nov 01, 2014
Judy Hoffman, Sergio Guadarrama, Eric Tzeng, Ronghang Hu, Jeff Donahue, Ross Girshick, Trevor Darrell, Kate Saenko

A major challenge in scaling object detection is the difficulty of obtaining labeled images for large numbers of categories. Recently, deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have emerged as clear winners on object classification benchmarks, in part due to training with 1.2M+ labeled classification images. Unfortunately, only a small fraction of those labels are available for the detection task. It is much cheaper and easier to collect large quantities of image-level labels from search engines than it is to collect detection data and label it with precise bounding boxes. In this paper, we propose Large Scale Detection through Adaptation (LSDA), an algorithm which learns the difference between the two tasks and transfers this knowledge to classifiers for categories without bounding box annotated data, turning them into detectors. Our method has the potential to enable detection for the tens of thousands of categories that lack bounding box annotations, yet have plenty of classification data. Evaluation on the ImageNet LSVRC-2013 detection challenge demonstrates the efficacy of our approach. This algorithm enables us to produce a >7.6K detector by using available classification data from leaf nodes in the ImageNet tree. We additionally demonstrate how to modify our architecture to produce a fast detector (running at 2fps for the 7.6K detector). Models and software are available at

* Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) 2014 

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Caffe: Convolutional Architecture for Fast Feature Embedding

Jun 20, 2014
Yangqing Jia, Evan Shelhamer, Jeff Donahue, Sergey Karayev, Jonathan Long, Ross Girshick, Sergio Guadarrama, Trevor Darrell

Caffe provides multimedia scientists and practitioners with a clean and modifiable framework for state-of-the-art deep learning algorithms and a collection of reference models. The framework is a BSD-licensed C++ library with Python and MATLAB bindings for training and deploying general-purpose convolutional neural networks and other deep models efficiently on commodity architectures. Caffe fits industry and internet-scale media needs by CUDA GPU computation, processing over 40 million images a day on a single K40 or Titan GPU ($\approx$ 2.5 ms per image). By separating model representation from actual implementation, Caffe allows experimentation and seamless switching among platforms for ease of development and deployment from prototyping machines to cloud environments. Caffe is maintained and developed by the Berkeley Vision and Learning Center (BVLC) with the help of an active community of contributors on GitHub. It powers ongoing research projects, large-scale industrial applications, and startup prototypes in vision, speech, and multimedia.

* Tech report for the Caffe software at http://github.com/BVLC/Caffe/ 

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High Fidelity Speech Synthesis with Adversarial Networks

Sep 26, 2019
Mikołaj Bińkowski, Jeff Donahue, Sander Dieleman, Aidan Clark, Erich Elsen, Norman Casagrande, Luis C. Cobo, Karen Simonyan

Generative adversarial networks have seen rapid development in recent years and have led to remarkable improvements in generative modelling of images. However, their application in the audio domain has received limited attention, and autoregressive models, such as WaveNet, remain the state of the art in generative modelling of audio signals such as human speech. To address this paucity, we introduce GAN-TTS, a Generative Adversarial Network for Text-to-Speech. Our architecture is composed of a conditional feed-forward generator producing raw speech audio, and an ensemble of discriminators which operate on random windows of different sizes. The discriminators analyse the audio both in terms of general realism, as well as how well the audio corresponds to the utterance that should be pronounced. To measure the performance of GAN-TTS, we employ both subjective human evaluation (MOS - Mean Opinion Score), as well as novel quantitative metrics (Fr\'echet DeepSpeech Distance and Kernel DeepSpeech Distance), which we find to be well correlated with MOS. We show that GAN-TTS is capable of generating high-fidelity speech with naturalness comparable to the state-of-the-art models, and unlike autoregressive models, it is highly parallelisable thanks to an efficient feed-forward generator. Listen to GAN-TTS reading this abstract at https://storage.googleapis.com/deepmind-media/research/abstract.wav.


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