Research papers and code for "Jishen Zhao":
Reverse engineering of binary executables is a critical problem in the computer security domain. On the one hand, malicious parties may recover interpretable source codes from the software products to gain commercial advantages. On the other hand, binary decompilation can be leveraged for code vulnerability analysis and malware detection. However, efficient binary decompilation is challenging. Conventional decompilers have the following major limitations: (i) they are only applicable to specific source-target language pair, hence incurs undesired development cost for new language tasks; (ii) their output high-level code cannot effectively preserve the correct functionality of the input binary; (iii) their output program does not capture the semantics of the input and the reversed program is hard to interpret. To address the above problems, we propose Coda, the first end-to-end neural-based framework for code decompilation. Coda decomposes the decompilation task into two key phases: First, Coda employs an instruction type-aware encoder and a tree decoder for generating an abstract syntax tree (AST) with attention feeding during the code sketch generation stage. Second, Coda then updates the code sketch using an iterative error correction machine guided by an ensembled neural error predictor. By finding a good approximate candidate and then fixing it towards perfect, Coda achieves superior performance compared to baseline approaches. We assess Coda's performance with extensive experiments on various benchmarks. Evaluation results show that Coda achieves an average of 82\% program recovery accuracy on unseen binary samples, where the state-of-the-art decompilers yield 0\% accuracy. Furthermore, Coda outperforms the sequence-to-sequence model with attention by a margin of 70\% program accuracy.

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Recently, autonomous driving development ignited competition among car makers and technical corporations. Low-level automation cars are already commercially available. But high automated vehicles where the vehicle drives by itself without human monitoring is still at infancy. Such autonomous vehicles (AVs) rely on the computing system in the car to to interpret the environment and make driving decisions. Therefore, computing system design is essential particularly in enhancing the attainment of driving safety. However, to our knowledge, no clear guideline exists so far regarding safety-aware AV computing system and architecture design. To understand the safety requirement of AV computing system, we performed a field study by running industrial Level-4 autonomous driving fleets in various locations, road conditions, and traffic patterns. The field study indicates that traditional computing system performance metrics, such as tail latency, average latency, maximum latency, and timeout, cannot fully satisfy the safety requirement for AV computing system design. To address this issue, we propose a `safety score' as a primary metric for measuring the level of safety in AV computing system design. Furthermore, we propose a perception latency model, which helps architects estimate the safety score of given architecture and system design without physically testing them in an AV. We demonstrate the use of our safety score and latency model, by developing and evaluating a safety-aware AV computing system computation hardware resource management scheme.

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