Models, code, and papers for "Martín Abadi":

TensorFlow: A system for large-scale machine learning

May 31, 2016
Martín Abadi, Paul Barham, Jianmin Chen, Zhifeng Chen, Andy Davis, Jeffrey Dean, Matthieu Devin, Sanjay Ghemawat, Geoffrey Irving, Michael Isard, Manjunath Kudlur, Josh Levenberg, Rajat Monga, Sherry Moore, Derek G. Murray, Benoit Steiner, Paul Tucker, Vijay Vasudevan, Pete Warden, Martin Wicke, Yuan Yu, Xiaoqiang Zheng

TensorFlow is a machine learning system that operates at large scale and in heterogeneous environments. TensorFlow uses dataflow graphs to represent computation, shared state, and the operations that mutate that state. It maps the nodes of a dataflow graph across many machines in a cluster, and within a machine across multiple computational devices, including multicore CPUs, general-purpose GPUs, and custom designed ASICs known as Tensor Processing Units (TPUs). This architecture gives flexibility to the application developer: whereas in previous "parameter server" designs the management of shared state is built into the system, TensorFlow enables developers to experiment with novel optimizations and training algorithms. TensorFlow supports a variety of applications, with particularly strong support for training and inference on deep neural networks. Several Google services use TensorFlow in production, we have released it as an open-source project, and it has become widely used for machine learning research. In this paper, we describe the TensorFlow dataflow model in contrast to existing systems, and demonstrate the compelling performance that TensorFlow achieves for several real-world applications.

* 18 pages, 9 figures; v2 has a spelling correction in the metadata 

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TensorFlow: Large-Scale Machine Learning on Heterogeneous Distributed Systems

Mar 16, 2016
Martín Abadi, Ashish Agarwal, Paul Barham, Eugene Brevdo, Zhifeng Chen, Craig Citro, Greg S. Corrado, Andy Davis, Jeffrey Dean, Matthieu Devin, Sanjay Ghemawat, Ian Goodfellow, Andrew Harp, Geoffrey Irving, Michael Isard, Yangqing Jia, Rafal Jozefowicz, Lukasz Kaiser, Manjunath Kudlur, Josh Levenberg, Dan Mane, Rajat Monga, Sherry Moore, Derek Murray, Chris Olah, Mike Schuster, Jonathon Shlens, Benoit Steiner, Ilya Sutskever, Kunal Talwar, Paul Tucker, Vincent Vanhoucke, Vijay Vasudevan, Fernanda Viegas, Oriol Vinyals, Pete Warden, Martin Wattenberg, Martin Wicke, Yuan Yu, Xiaoqiang Zheng

TensorFlow is an interface for expressing machine learning algorithms, and an implementation for executing such algorithms. A computation expressed using TensorFlow can be executed with little or no change on a wide variety of heterogeneous systems, ranging from mobile devices such as phones and tablets up to large-scale distributed systems of hundreds of machines and thousands of computational devices such as GPU cards. The system is flexible and can be used to express a wide variety of algorithms, including training and inference algorithms for deep neural network models, and it has been used for conducting research and for deploying machine learning systems into production across more than a dozen areas of computer science and other fields, including speech recognition, computer vision, robotics, information retrieval, natural language processing, geographic information extraction, and computational drug discovery. This paper describes the TensorFlow interface and an implementation of that interface that we have built at Google. The TensorFlow API and a reference implementation were released as an open-source package under the Apache 2.0 license in November, 2015 and are available at www.tensorflow.org.

* Version 2 updates only the metadata, to correct the formatting of Mart\'in Abadi's name 

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A Simple Differentiable Programming Language

Nov 18, 2019
Martin Abadi, Gordon D. Plotkin

Automatic differentiation plays a prominent role in scientific computing and in modern machine learning, often in the context of powerful programming systems. The relation of the various embodiments of automatic differentiation to the mathematical notion of derivative is not always entirely clear---discrepancies can arise, sometimes inadvertently. In order to study automatic differentiation in such programming contexts, we define a small but expressive programming language that includes a construct for reverse-mode differentiation. We give operational and denotational semantics for this language. The operational semantics employs popular implementation techniques, while the denotational semantics employs notions of differentiation familiar from real analysis. We establish that these semantics coincide.

* In POPL2020 

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Learning to Protect Communications with Adversarial Neural Cryptography

Oct 21, 2016
Martín Abadi, David G. Andersen

We ask whether neural networks can learn to use secret keys to protect information from other neural networks. Specifically, we focus on ensuring confidentiality properties in a multiagent system, and we specify those properties in terms of an adversary. Thus, a system may consist of neural networks named Alice and Bob, and we aim to limit what a third neural network named Eve learns from eavesdropping on the communication between Alice and Bob. We do not prescribe specific cryptographic algorithms to these neural networks; instead, we train end-to-end, adversarially. We demonstrate that the neural networks can learn how to perform forms of encryption and decryption, and also how to apply these operations selectively in order to meet confidentiality goals.

* 15 pages 

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Semi-supervised Knowledge Transfer for Deep Learning from Private Training Data

Mar 03, 2017
Nicolas Papernot, Martín Abadi, Úlfar Erlingsson, Ian Goodfellow, Kunal Talwar

Some machine learning applications involve training data that is sensitive, such as the medical histories of patients in a clinical trial. A model may inadvertently and implicitly store some of its training data; careful analysis of the model may therefore reveal sensitive information. To address this problem, we demonstrate a generally applicable approach to providing strong privacy guarantees for training data: Private Aggregation of Teacher Ensembles (PATE). The approach combines, in a black-box fashion, multiple models trained with disjoint datasets, such as records from different subsets of users. Because they rely directly on sensitive data, these models are not published, but instead used as "teachers" for a "student" model. The student learns to predict an output chosen by noisy voting among all of the teachers, and cannot directly access an individual teacher or the underlying data or parameters. The student's privacy properties can be understood both intuitively (since no single teacher and thus no single dataset dictates the student's training) and formally, in terms of differential privacy. These properties hold even if an adversary can not only query the student but also inspect its internal workings. Compared with previous work, the approach imposes only weak assumptions on how teachers are trained: it applies to any model, including non-convex models like DNNs. We achieve state-of-the-art privacy/utility trade-offs on MNIST and SVHN thanks to an improved privacy analysis and semi-supervised learning.

* Accepted to ICLR 17 as an oral 

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Adversarial Patch

May 17, 2018
Tom B. Brown, Dandelion Mané, Aurko Roy, Martín Abadi, Justin Gilmer

We present a method to create universal, robust, targeted adversarial image patches in the real world. The patches are universal because they can be used to attack any scene, robust because they work under a wide variety of transformations, and targeted because they can cause a classifier to output any target class. These adversarial patches can be printed, added to any scene, photographed, and presented to image classifiers; even when the patches are small, they cause the classifiers to ignore the other items in the scene and report a chosen target class. To reproduce the results from the paper, our code is available at https://github.com/tensorflow/cleverhans/tree/master/examples/adversarial_patch


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Learning a Natural Language Interface with Neural Programmer

Mar 02, 2017
Arvind Neelakantan, Quoc V. Le, Martin Abadi, Andrew McCallum, Dario Amodei

Learning a natural language interface for database tables is a challenging task that involves deep language understanding and multi-step reasoning. The task is often approached by mapping natural language queries to logical forms or programs that provide the desired response when executed on the database. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first weakly supervised, end-to-end neural network model to induce such programs on a real-world dataset. We enhance the objective function of Neural Programmer, a neural network with built-in discrete operations, and apply it on WikiTableQuestions, a natural language question-answering dataset. The model is trained end-to-end with weak supervision of question-answer pairs, and does not require domain-specific grammars, rules, or annotations that are key elements in previous approaches to program induction. The main experimental result in this paper is that a single Neural Programmer model achieves 34.2% accuracy using only 10,000 examples with weak supervision. An ensemble of 15 models, with a trivial combination technique, achieves 37.7% accuracy, which is competitive to the current state-of-the-art accuracy of 37.1% obtained by a traditional natural language semantic parser.

* Published as a conference paper at ICLR 2017 

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Deep Learning with Differential Privacy

Oct 24, 2016
Martín Abadi, Andy Chu, Ian Goodfellow, H. Brendan McMahan, Ilya Mironov, Kunal Talwar, Li Zhang

Machine learning techniques based on neural networks are achieving remarkable results in a wide variety of domains. Often, the training of models requires large, representative datasets, which may be crowdsourced and contain sensitive information. The models should not expose private information in these datasets. Addressing this goal, we develop new algorithmic techniques for learning and a refined analysis of privacy costs within the framework of differential privacy. Our implementation and experiments demonstrate that we can train deep neural networks with non-convex objectives, under a modest privacy budget, and at a manageable cost in software complexity, training efficiency, and model quality.


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On the Protection of Private Information in Machine Learning Systems: Two Recent Approaches

Aug 26, 2017
Martín Abadi, Úlfar Erlingsson, Ian Goodfellow, H. Brendan McMahan, Ilya Mironov, Nicolas Papernot, Kunal Talwar, Li Zhang

The recent, remarkable growth of machine learning has led to intense interest in the privacy of the data on which machine learning relies, and to new techniques for preserving privacy. However, older ideas about privacy may well remain valid and useful. This note reviews two recent works on privacy in the light of the wisdom of some of the early literature, in particular the principles distilled by Saltzer and Schroeder in the 1970s.

* IEEE 30th Computer Security Foundations Symposium (CSF), pages 1--6, 2017 

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Dynamic Control Flow in Large-Scale Machine Learning

May 04, 2018
Yuan Yu, Martín Abadi, Paul Barham, Eugene Brevdo, Mike Burrows, Andy Davis, Jeff Dean, Sanjay Ghemawat, Tim Harley, Peter Hawkins, Michael Isard, Manjunath Kudlur, Rajat Monga, Derek Murray, Xiaoqiang Zheng

Many recent machine learning models rely on fine-grained dynamic control flow for training and inference. In particular, models based on recurrent neural networks and on reinforcement learning depend on recurrence relations, data-dependent conditional execution, and other features that call for dynamic control flow. These applications benefit from the ability to make rapid control-flow decisions across a set of computing devices in a distributed system. For performance, scalability, and expressiveness, a machine learning system must support dynamic control flow in distributed and heterogeneous environments. This paper presents a programming model for distributed machine learning that supports dynamic control flow. We describe the design of the programming model, and its implementation in TensorFlow, a distributed machine learning system. Our approach extends the use of dataflow graphs to represent machine learning models, offering several distinctive features. First, the branches of conditionals and bodies of loops can be partitioned across many machines to run on a set of heterogeneous devices, including CPUs, GPUs, and custom ASICs. Second, programs written in our model support automatic differentiation and distributed gradient computations, which are necessary for training machine learning models that use control flow. Third, our choice of non-strict semantics enables multiple loop iterations to execute in parallel across machines, and to overlap compute and I/O operations. We have done our work in the context of TensorFlow, and it has been used extensively in research and production. We evaluate it using several real-world applications, and demonstrate its performance and scalability.

* EuroSys 2018: Thirteenth EuroSys Conference, April 23-26, 2018, Porto, Portugal. ACM, New York, NY, USA 
* Appeared in EuroSys 2018. 14 pages, 16 figures 

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Automated Labelling using an Attention model for Radiology reports of MRI scans (ALARM)

Feb 16, 2020
David A. Wood, Jeremy Lynch, Sina Kafiabadi, Emily Guilhem, Aisha Al Busaidi, Antanas Montvila, Thomas Varsavsky, Juveria Siddiqui, Naveen Gadapa, Matthew Townend, Martin Kiik, Keena Patel, Gareth Barker, Sebastian Ourselin, James H. Cole, Thomas C. Booth

Labelling large datasets for training high-capacity neural networks is a major obstacle to the development of deep learning-based medical imaging applications. Here we present a transformer-based network for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radiology report classification which automates this task by assigning image labels on the basis of free-text expert radiology reports. Our model's performance is comparable to that of an expert radiologist, and better than that of an expert physician, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. We make code available online for researchers to label their own MRI datasets for medical imaging applications.


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