Models, code, and papers for "Matthew D. Hoffman":

Approximate Maximum A Posteriori Inference with Entropic Priors

Sep 29, 2010
Matthew D. Hoffman

In certain applications it is useful to fit multinomial distributions to observed data with a penalty term that encourages sparsity. For example, in probabilistic latent audio source decomposition one may wish to encode the assumption that only a few latent sources are active at any given time. The standard heuristic of applying an L1 penalty is not an option when fitting the parameters to a multinomial distribution, which are constrained to sum to 1. An alternative is to use a penalty term that encourages low-entropy solutions, which corresponds to maximum a posteriori (MAP) parameter estimation with an entropic prior. The lack of conjugacy between the entropic prior and the multinomial distribution complicates this approach. In this report I propose a simple iterative algorithm for MAP estimation of multinomial distributions with sparsity-inducing entropic priors.


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A trust-region method for stochastic variational inference with applications to streaming data

May 28, 2015
Lucas Theis, Matthew D. Hoffman

Stochastic variational inference allows for fast posterior inference in complex Bayesian models. However, the algorithm is prone to local optima which can make the quality of the posterior approximation sensitive to the choice of hyperparameters and initialization. We address this problem by replacing the natural gradient step of stochastic varitional inference with a trust-region update. We show that this leads to generally better results and reduced sensitivity to hyperparameters. We also describe a new strategy for variational inference on streaming data and show that here our trust-region method is crucial for getting good performance.

* in Proceedings of the 32nd International Conference on Machine Learning, 2015 

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Beta Process Non-negative Matrix Factorization with Stochastic Structured Mean-Field Variational Inference

Dec 02, 2014
Dawen Liang, Matthew D. Hoffman

Beta process is the standard nonparametric Bayesian prior for latent factor model. In this paper, we derive a structured mean-field variational inference algorithm for a beta process non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) model with Poisson likelihood. Unlike the linear Gaussian model, which is well-studied in the nonparametric Bayesian literature, NMF model with beta process prior does not enjoy the conjugacy. We leverage the recently developed stochastic structured mean-field variational inference to relax the conjugacy constraint and restore the dependencies among the latent variables in the approximating variational distribution. Preliminary results on both synthetic and real examples demonstrate that the proposed inference algorithm can reasonably recover the hidden structure of the data.

* 6 pages, 1 figure 

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The No-U-Turn Sampler: Adaptively Setting Path Lengths in Hamiltonian Monte Carlo

Nov 18, 2011
Matthew D. Hoffman, Andrew Gelman

Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) is a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm that avoids the random walk behavior and sensitivity to correlated parameters that plague many MCMC methods by taking a series of steps informed by first-order gradient information. These features allow it to converge to high-dimensional target distributions much more quickly than simpler methods such as random walk Metropolis or Gibbs sampling. However, HMC's performance is highly sensitive to two user-specified parameters: a step size {\epsilon} and a desired number of steps L. In particular, if L is too small then the algorithm exhibits undesirable random walk behavior, while if L is too large the algorithm wastes computation. We introduce the No-U-Turn Sampler (NUTS), an extension to HMC that eliminates the need to set a number of steps L. NUTS uses a recursive algorithm to build a set of likely candidate points that spans a wide swath of the target distribution, stopping automatically when it starts to double back and retrace its steps. Empirically, NUTS perform at least as efficiently as and sometimes more efficiently than a well tuned standard HMC method, without requiring user intervention or costly tuning runs. We also derive a method for adapting the step size parameter {\epsilon} on the fly based on primal-dual averaging. NUTS can thus be used with no hand-tuning at all. NUTS is also suitable for applications such as BUGS-style automatic inference engines that require efficient "turnkey" sampling algorithms.

* 30 pages, 7 figures 

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Structured Stochastic Variational Inference

Nov 26, 2014
Matthew D. Hoffman, David M. Blei

Stochastic variational inference makes it possible to approximate posterior distributions induced by large datasets quickly using stochastic optimization. The algorithm relies on the use of fully factorized variational distributions. However, this "mean-field" independence approximation limits the fidelity of the posterior approximation, and introduces local optima. We show how to relax the mean-field approximation to allow arbitrary dependencies between global parameters and local hidden variables, producing better parameter estimates by reducing bias, sensitivity to local optima, and sensitivity to hyperparameters.


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Automatic Reparameterisation of Probabilistic Programs

Jun 07, 2019
Maria I. Gorinova, Dave Moore, Matthew D. Hoffman

Probabilistic programming has emerged as a powerful paradigm in statistics, applied science, and machine learning: by decoupling modelling from inference, it promises to allow modellers to directly reason about the processes generating data. However, the performance of inference algorithms can be dramatically affected by the parameterisation used to express a model, requiring users to transform their programs in non-intuitive ways. We argue for automating these transformations, and demonstrate that mechanisms available in recent modeling frameworks can implement non-centring and related reparameterisations. This enables new inference algorithms, and we propose two: a simple approach using interleaved sampling and a novel variational formulation that searches over a continuous space of parameterisations. We show that these approaches enable robust inference across a range of models, and can yield more efficient samplers than the best fixed parameterisation.


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Autoconj: Recognizing and Exploiting Conjugacy Without a Domain-Specific Language

Nov 29, 2018
Matthew D. Hoffman, Matthew J. Johnson, Dustin Tran

Deriving conditional and marginal distributions using conjugacy relationships can be time consuming and error prone. In this paper, we propose a strategy for automating such derivations. Unlike previous systems which focus on relationships between pairs of random variables, our system (which we call Autoconj) operates directly on Python functions that compute log-joint distribution functions. Autoconj provides support for conjugacy-exploiting algorithms in any Python embedded PPL. This paves the way for accelerating development of novel inference algorithms and structure-exploiting modeling strategies.

* Appears in Neural Information Processing Systems, 2018. Code available at https://github.com/google-research/autoconj 

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The LORACs prior for VAEs: Letting the Trees Speak for the Data

Oct 16, 2018
Sharad Vikram, Matthew D. Hoffman, Matthew J. Johnson

In variational autoencoders, the prior on the latent codes $z$ is often treated as an afterthought, but the prior shapes the kind of latent representation that the model learns. If the goal is to learn a representation that is interpretable and useful, then the prior should reflect the ways in which the high-level factors that describe the data vary. The "default" prior is an isotropic normal, but if the natural factors of variation in the dataset exhibit discrete structure or are not independent, then the isotropic-normal prior will actually encourage learning representations that mask this structure. To alleviate this problem, we propose using a flexible Bayesian nonparametric hierarchical clustering prior based on the time-marginalized coalescent (TMC). To scale learning to large datasets, we develop a new inducing-point approximation and inference algorithm. We then apply the method without supervision to several datasets and examine the interpretability and practical performance of the inferred hierarchies and learned latent space.


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Generalizing Hamiltonian Monte Carlo with Neural Networks

Mar 02, 2018
Daniel Levy, Matthew D. Hoffman, Jascha Sohl-Dickstein

We present a general-purpose method to train Markov chain Monte Carlo kernels, parameterized by deep neural networks, that converge and mix quickly to their target distribution. Our method generalizes Hamiltonian Monte Carlo and is trained to maximize expected squared jumped distance, a proxy for mixing speed. We demonstrate large empirical gains on a collection of simple but challenging distributions, for instance achieving a 106x improvement in effective sample size in one case, and mixing when standard HMC makes no measurable progress in a second. Finally, we show quantitative and qualitative gains on a real-world task: latent-variable generative modeling. We release an open source TensorFlow implementation of the algorithm.

* ICLR 2018 

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Stochastic Gradient Descent as Approximate Bayesian Inference

Jan 19, 2018
Stephan Mandt, Matthew D. Hoffman, David M. Blei

Stochastic Gradient Descent with a constant learning rate (constant SGD) simulates a Markov chain with a stationary distribution. With this perspective, we derive several new results. (1) We show that constant SGD can be used as an approximate Bayesian posterior inference algorithm. Specifically, we show how to adjust the tuning parameters of constant SGD to best match the stationary distribution to a posterior, minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between these two distributions. (2) We demonstrate that constant SGD gives rise to a new variational EM algorithm that optimizes hyperparameters in complex probabilistic models. (3) We also propose SGD with momentum for sampling and show how to adjust the damping coefficient accordingly. (4) We analyze MCMC algorithms. For Langevin Dynamics and Stochastic Gradient Fisher Scoring, we quantify the approximation errors due to finite learning rates. Finally (5), we use the stochastic process perspective to give a short proof of why Polyak averaging is optimal. Based on this idea, we propose a scalable approximate MCMC algorithm, the Averaged Stochastic Gradient Sampler.

* Journal of Machine Learning Research 18 (2017) 1-35 
* 35 pages, published version (JMLR 2017) 

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A Variational Analysis of Stochastic Gradient Algorithms

Feb 08, 2016
Stephan Mandt, Matthew D. Hoffman, David M. Blei

Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) is an important algorithm in machine learning. With constant learning rates, it is a stochastic process that, after an initial phase of convergence, generates samples from a stationary distribution. We show that SGD with constant rates can be effectively used as an approximate posterior inference algorithm for probabilistic modeling. Specifically, we show how to adjust the tuning parameters of SGD such as to match the resulting stationary distribution to the posterior. This analysis rests on interpreting SGD as a continuous-time stochastic process and then minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between its stationary distribution and the target posterior. (This is in the spirit of variational inference.) In more detail, we model SGD as a multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and then use properties of this process to derive the optimal parameters. This theoretical framework also connects SGD to modern scalable inference algorithms; we analyze the recently proposed stochastic gradient Fisher scoring under this perspective. We demonstrate that SGD with properly chosen constant rates gives a new way to optimize hyperparameters in probabilistic models.

* International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML 2016), p. 354--363 
* 8 pages, 3 figures 

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A Generative Product-of-Filters Model of Audio

Nov 25, 2014
Dawen Liang, Matthew D. Hoffman, Gautham J. Mysore

We propose the product-of-filters (PoF) model, a generative model that decomposes audio spectra as sparse linear combinations of "filters" in the log-spectral domain. PoF makes similar assumptions to those used in the classic homomorphic filtering approach to signal processing, but replaces hand-designed decompositions built of basic signal processing operations with a learned decomposition based on statistical inference. This paper formulates the PoF model and derives a mean-field method for posterior inference and a variational EM algorithm to estimate the model's free parameters. We demonstrate PoF's potential for audio processing on a bandwidth expansion task, and show that PoF can serve as an effective unsupervised feature extractor for a speaker identification task.

* ICLR 2014 conference-track submission. Added link to the source code 

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Image Classification and Retrieval from User-Supplied Tags

Nov 25, 2014
Hamid Izadinia, Ali Farhadi, Aaron Hertzmann, Matthew D. Hoffman

This paper proposes direct learning of image classification from user-supplied tags, without filtering. Each tag is supplied by the user who shared the image online. Enormous numbers of these tags are freely available online, and they give insight about the image categories important to users and to image classification. Our approach is complementary to the conventional approach of manual annotation, which is extremely costly. We analyze of the Flickr 100 Million Image dataset, making several useful observations about the statistics of these tags. We introduce a large-scale robust classification algorithm, in order to handle the inherent noise in these tags, and a calibration procedure to better predict objective annotations. We show that freely available, user-supplied tags can obtain similar or superior results to large databases of costly manual annotations.


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Variational Autoencoders for Collaborative Filtering

Feb 16, 2018
Dawen Liang, Rahul G. Krishnan, Matthew D. Hoffman, Tony Jebara

We extend variational autoencoders (VAEs) to collaborative filtering for implicit feedback. This non-linear probabilistic model enables us to go beyond the limited modeling capacity of linear factor models which still largely dominate collaborative filtering research.We introduce a generative model with multinomial likelihood and use Bayesian inference for parameter estimation. Despite widespread use in language modeling and economics, the multinomial likelihood receives less attention in the recommender systems literature. We introduce a different regularization parameter for the learning objective, which proves to be crucial for achieving competitive performance. Remarkably, there is an efficient way to tune the parameter using annealing. The resulting model and learning algorithm has information-theoretic connections to maximum entropy discrimination and the information bottleneck principle. Empirically, we show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms several state-of-the-art baselines, including two recently-proposed neural network approaches, on several real-world datasets. We also provide extended experiments comparing the multinomial likelihood with other commonly used likelihood functions in the latent factor collaborative filtering literature and show favorable results. Finally, we identify the pros and cons of employing a principled Bayesian inference approach and characterize settings where it provides the most significant improvements.

* 10 pages, 3 figures. WWW 2018 

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Automatically Batching Control-Intensive Programs for Modern Accelerators

Oct 23, 2019
Alexey Radul, Brian Patton, Dougal Maclaurin, Matthew D. Hoffman, Rif A. Saurous

We present a general approach to batching arbitrary computations for accelerators such as GPUs. We show orders-of-magnitude speedups using our method on the No U-Turn Sampler (NUTS), a workhorse algorithm in Bayesian statistics. The central challenge of batching NUTS and other Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms is data-dependent control flow and recursion. We overcome this by mechanically transforming a single-example implementation into a form that explicitly tracks the current program point for each batch member, and only steps forward those in the same place. We present two different batching algorithms: a simpler, previously published one that inherits recursion from the host Python, and a more complex, novel one that implemenents recursion directly and can batch across it. We implement these batching methods as a general program transformation on Python source. Both the batching system and the NUTS implementation presented here are available as part of the popular TensorFlow Probability software package.

* 10 pages; under review for Systems and Machine Learning 2020 

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Multimodal Prediction and Personalization of Photo Edits with Deep Generative Models

Apr 17, 2017
Ardavan Saeedi, Matthew D. Hoffman, Stephen J. DiVerdi, Asma Ghandeharioun, Matthew J. Johnson, Ryan P. Adams

Professional-grade software applications are powerful but complicated$-$expert users can achieve impressive results, but novices often struggle to complete even basic tasks. Photo editing is a prime example: after loading a photo, the user is confronted with an array of cryptic sliders like "clarity", "temp", and "highlights". An automatically generated suggestion could help, but there is no single "correct" edit for a given image$-$different experts may make very different aesthetic decisions when faced with the same image, and a single expert may make different choices depending on the intended use of the image (or on a whim). We therefore want a system that can propose multiple diverse, high-quality edits while also learning from and adapting to a user's aesthetic preferences. In this work, we develop a statistical model that meets these objectives. Our model builds on recent advances in neural network generative modeling and scalable inference, and uses hierarchical structure to learn editing patterns across many diverse users. Empirically, we find that our model outperforms other approaches on this challenging multimodal prediction task.


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Deep Probabilistic Programming

Mar 07, 2017
Dustin Tran, Matthew D. Hoffman, Rif A. Saurous, Eugene Brevdo, Kevin Murphy, David M. Blei

We propose Edward, a Turing-complete probabilistic programming language. Edward defines two compositional representations---random variables and inference. By treating inference as a first class citizen, on a par with modeling, we show that probabilistic programming can be as flexible and computationally efficient as traditional deep learning. For flexibility, Edward makes it easy to fit the same model using a variety of composable inference methods, ranging from point estimation to variational inference to MCMC. In addition, Edward can reuse the modeling representation as part of inference, facilitating the design of rich variational models and generative adversarial networks. For efficiency, Edward is integrated into TensorFlow, providing significant speedups over existing probabilistic systems. For example, we show on a benchmark logistic regression task that Edward is at least 35x faster than Stan and 6x faster than PyMC3. Further, Edward incurs no runtime overhead: it is as fast as handwritten TensorFlow.

* Appears in International Conference on Learning Representations, 2017. A companion webpage for this paper is available at http://edwardlib.org/iclr2017 

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Music Transformer

Oct 10, 2018
Cheng-Zhi Anna Huang, Ashish Vaswani, Jakob Uszkoreit, Noam Shazeer, Ian Simon, Curtis Hawthorne, Andrew M. Dai, Matthew D. Hoffman, Monica Dinculescu, Douglas Eck

Music relies heavily on repetition to build structure and meaning. Self-reference occurs on multiple timescales, from motifs to phrases to reusing of entire sections of music, such as in pieces with ABA structure. The Transformer (Vaswani et al., 2017), a sequence model based on self-attention, has achieved compelling results in many generation tasks that require maintaining long-range coherence. This suggests that self-attention might also be well-suited to modeling music. In musical composition and performance, however, relative timing is critically important. Existing approaches for representing relative positional information in the Transformer modulate attention based on pairwise distance (Shaw et al., 2018). This is impractical for long sequences such as musical compositions since their memory complexity is quadratic in the sequence length. We propose an algorithm that reduces the intermediate memory requirements to linear in the sequence length. This enables us to demonstrate that a Transformer with our modified relative attention mechanism can generate minute-long (thousands of steps) compositions with compelling structure, generate continuations that coherently elaborate on a given motif, and in a seq2seq setup generate accompaniments conditioned on melodies. We evaluate the Transformer with our relative attention mechanism on two datasets, JSB Chorales and Piano-e-competition, and obtain state-of-the-art results on the latter.

* Rewrote many sections to clarify the work, and extended relative attention to the local case. Previous title is "An Improved Relative Self-Attention Mechanism for Transformer with Application to Music Generation" 

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A General Framework for Constrained Bayesian Optimization using Information-based Search

Sep 04, 2016
José Miguel Hernández-Lobato, Michael A. Gelbart, Ryan P. Adams, Matthew W. Hoffman, Zoubin Ghahramani

We present an information-theoretic framework for solving global black-box optimization problems that also have black-box constraints. Of particular interest to us is to efficiently solve problems with decoupled constraints, in which subsets of the objective and constraint functions may be evaluated independently. For example, when the objective is evaluated on a CPU and the constraints are evaluated independently on a GPU. These problems require an acquisition function that can be separated into the contributions of the individual function evaluations. We develop one such acquisition function and call it Predictive Entropy Search with Constraints (PESC). PESC is an approximation to the expected information gain criterion and it compares favorably to alternative approaches based on improvement in several synthetic and real-world problems. In addition to this, we consider problems with a mix of functions that are fast and slow to evaluate. These problems require balancing the amount of time spent in the meta-computation of PESC and in the actual evaluation of the target objective. We take a bounded rationality approach and develop partial update for PESC which trades off accuracy against speed. We then propose a method for adaptively switching between the partial and full updates for PESC. This allows us to interpolate between versions of PESC that are efficient in terms of function evaluations and those that are efficient in terms of wall-clock time. Overall, we demonstrate that PESC is an effective algorithm that provides a promising direction towards a unified solution for constrained Bayesian optimization.


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Learned Optimizers that Scale and Generalize

Sep 07, 2017
Olga Wichrowska, Niru Maheswaranathan, Matthew W. Hoffman, Sergio Gomez Colmenarejo, Misha Denil, Nando de Freitas, Jascha Sohl-Dickstein

Learning to learn has emerged as an important direction for achieving artificial intelligence. Two of the primary barriers to its adoption are an inability to scale to larger problems and a limited ability to generalize to new tasks. We introduce a learned gradient descent optimizer that generalizes well to new tasks, and which has significantly reduced memory and computation overhead. We achieve this by introducing a novel hierarchical RNN architecture, with minimal per-parameter overhead, augmented with additional architectural features that mirror the known structure of optimization tasks. We also develop a meta-training ensemble of small, diverse optimization tasks capturing common properties of loss landscapes. The optimizer learns to outperform RMSProp/ADAM on problems in this corpus. More importantly, it performs comparably or better when applied to small convolutional neural networks, despite seeing no neural networks in its meta-training set. Finally, it generalizes to train Inception V3 and ResNet V2 architectures on the ImageNet dataset for thousands of steps, optimization problems that are of a vastly different scale than those it was trained on. We release an open source implementation of the meta-training algorithm.

* Final ICML paper after reviewer suggestions 

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