Models, code, and papers for "Matthew E. Peters":

Deep contextualized word representations

Mar 22, 2018
Matthew E. Peters, Mark Neumann, Mohit Iyyer, Matt Gardner, Christopher Clark, Kenton Lee, Luke Zettlemoyer

We introduce a new type of deep contextualized word representation that models both (1) complex characteristics of word use (e.g., syntax and semantics), and (2) how these uses vary across linguistic contexts (i.e., to model polysemy). Our word vectors are learned functions of the internal states of a deep bidirectional language model (biLM), which is pre-trained on a large text corpus. We show that these representations can be easily added to existing models and significantly improve the state of the art across six challenging NLP problems, including question answering, textual entailment and sentiment analysis. We also present an analysis showing that exposing the deep internals of the pre-trained network is crucial, allowing downstream models to mix different types of semi-supervision signals.

* NAACL 2018. Originally posted to openreview 27 Oct 2017. v2 updated for NAACL camera ready 

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Dissecting Contextual Word Embeddings: Architecture and Representation

Sep 27, 2018
Matthew E. Peters, Mark Neumann, Luke Zettlemoyer, Wen-tau Yih

Contextual word representations derived from pre-trained bidirectional language models (biLMs) have recently been shown to provide significant improvements to the state of the art for a wide range of NLP tasks. However, many questions remain as to how and why these models are so effective. In this paper, we present a detailed empirical study of how the choice of neural architecture (e.g. LSTM, CNN, or self attention) influences both end task accuracy and qualitative properties of the representations that are learned. We show there is a tradeoff between speed and accuracy, but all architectures learn high quality contextual representations that outperform word embeddings for four challenging NLP tasks. Additionally, all architectures learn representations that vary with network depth, from exclusively morphological based at the word embedding layer through local syntax based in the lower contextual layers to longer range semantics such coreference at the upper layers. Together, these results suggest that unsupervised biLMs, independent of architecture, are learning much more about the structure of language than previously appreciated.

* EMNLP 2018 

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Linguistic Knowledge and Transferability of Contextual Representations

Apr 11, 2019
Nelson F. Liu, Matt Gardner, Yonatan Belinkov, Matthew E. Peters, Noah A. Smith

Contextual word representations derived from large-scale neural language models are successful across a diverse set of NLP tasks, suggesting that they encode useful and transferable features of language. To shed light on the linguistic knowledge they capture, we study the representations produced by several recent pretrained contextualizers (variants of ELMo, the OpenAI transformer language model, and BERT) with a suite of sixteen diverse probing tasks. We find that linear models trained on top of frozen contextual representations are competitive with state-of-the-art task-specific models in many cases, but fail on tasks requiring fine-grained linguistic knowledge (e.g., conjunct identification). To investigate the transferability of contextual word representations, we quantify differences in the transferability of individual layers within contextualizers, especially between recurrent neural networks (RNNs) and transformers. For instance, higher layers of RNNs are more task-specific, while transformer layers do not exhibit the same monotonic trend. In addition, to better understand what makes contextual word representations transferable, we compare language model pretraining with eleven supervised pretraining tasks. For any given task, pretraining on a closely related task yields better performance than language model pretraining (which is better on average) when the pretraining dataset is fixed. However, language model pretraining on more data gives the best results.

* 22 pages, 4 figures; to appear at NAACL 2019. Converted appendices to two-column format for camera-ready 

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Semi-supervised sequence tagging with bidirectional language models

Apr 29, 2017
Matthew E. Peters, Waleed Ammar, Chandra Bhagavatula, Russell Power

Pre-trained word embeddings learned from unlabeled text have become a standard component of neural network architectures for NLP tasks. However, in most cases, the recurrent network that operates on word-level representations to produce context sensitive representations is trained on relatively little labeled data. In this paper, we demonstrate a general semi-supervised approach for adding pre- trained context embeddings from bidirectional language models to NLP systems and apply it to sequence labeling tasks. We evaluate our model on two standard datasets for named entity recognition (NER) and chunking, and in both cases achieve state of the art results, surpassing previous systems that use other forms of transfer or joint learning with additional labeled data and task specific gazetteers.

* To appear in ACL 2017 

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Barack's Wife Hillary: Using Knowledge-Graphs for Fact-Aware Language Modeling

Jun 20, 2019
Robert L. Logan IV, Nelson F. Liu, Matthew E. Peters, Matt Gardner, Sameer Singh

Modeling human language requires the ability to not only generate fluent text but also encode factual knowledge. However, traditional language models are only capable of remembering facts seen at training time, and often have difficulty recalling them. To address this, we introduce the knowledge graph language model (KGLM), a neural language model with mechanisms for selecting and copying facts from a knowledge graph that are relevant to the context. These mechanisms enable the model to render information it has never seen before, as well as generate out-of-vocabulary tokens. We also introduce the Linked WikiText-2 dataset, a corpus of annotated text aligned to the Wikidata knowledge graph whose contents (roughly) match the popular WikiText-2 benchmark. In experiments, we demonstrate that the KGLM achieves significantly better performance than a strong baseline language model. We additionally compare different language model's ability to complete sentences requiring factual knowledge, showing that the KGLM outperforms even very large language models in generating facts.


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Knowledge Enhanced Contextual Word Representations

Sep 09, 2019
Matthew E. Peters, Mark Neumann, Robert L. Logan IV, Roy Schwartz, Vidur Joshi, Sameer Singh, Noah A. Smith

Contextual word representations, typically trained on unstructured, unlabeled text, do not contain any explicit grounding to real world entities and are often unable to remember facts about those entities. We propose a general method to embed multiple knowledge bases (KBs) into large scale models, and thereby enhance their representations with structured, human-curated knowledge. For each KB, we first use an integrated entity linker to retrieve relevant entity embeddings, then update contextual word representations via a form of word-to-entity attention. In contrast to previous approaches, the entity linkers and self-supervised language modeling objective are jointly trained end-to-end in a multitask setting that combines a small amount of entity linking supervision with a large amount of raw text. After integrating WordNet and a subset of Wikipedia into BERT, the knowledge enhanced BERT (KnowBert) demonstrates improved perplexity, ability to recall facts as measured in a probing task and downstream performance on relationship extraction, entity typing, and word sense disambiguation. KnowBert's runtime is comparable to BERT's and it scales to large KBs.

* EMNLP 2019 

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Automated Quality Control in Image Segmentation: Application to the UK Biobank Cardiac MR Imaging Study

Jan 27, 2019
Robert Robinson, Vanya V. Valindria, Wenjia Bai, Ozan Oktay, Bernhard Kainz, Hideaki Suzuki, Mihir M. Sanghvi, Nay Aung, Jos$é$ Miguel Paiva, Filip Zemrak, Kenneth Fung, Elena Lukaschuk, Aaron M. Lee, Valentina Carapella, Young Jin Kim, Stefan K. Piechnik, Stefan Neubauer, Steffen E. Petersen, Chris Page, Paul M. Matthews, Daniel Rueckert, Ben Glocker

Background: The trend towards large-scale studies including population imaging poses new challenges in terms of quality control (QC). This is a particular issue when automatic processing tools, e.g. image segmentation methods, are employed to derive quantitative measures or biomarkers for later analyses. Manual inspection and visual QC of each segmentation isn't feasible at large scale. However, it's important to be able to automatically detect when a segmentation method fails so as to avoid inclusion of wrong measurements into subsequent analyses which could lead to incorrect conclusions. Methods: To overcome this challenge, we explore an approach for predicting segmentation quality based on Reverse Classification Accuracy, which enables us to discriminate between successful and failed segmentations on a per-cases basis. We validate this approach on a new, large-scale manually-annotated set of 4,800 cardiac magnetic resonance scans. We then apply our method to a large cohort of 7,250 cardiac MRI on which we have performed manual QC. Results: We report results used for predicting segmentation quality metrics including Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and surface-distance measures. As initial validation, we present data for 400 scans demonstrating 99% accuracy for classifying low and high quality segmentations using predicted DSC scores. As further validation we show high correlation between real and predicted scores and 95% classification accuracy on 4,800 scans for which manual segmentations were available. We mimic real-world application of the method on 7,250 cardiac MRI where we show good agreement between predicted quality metrics and manual visual QC scores. Conclusions: We show that RCA has the potential for accurate and fully automatic segmentation QC on a per-case basis in the context of large-scale population imaging as in the UK Biobank Imaging Study.

* 14 pages, 7 figures, Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 

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Automated cardiovascular magnetic resonance image analysis with fully convolutional networks

May 22, 2018
Wenjia Bai, Matthew Sinclair, Giacomo Tarroni, Ozan Oktay, Martin Rajchl, Ghislain Vaillant, Aaron M. Lee, Nay Aung, Elena Lukaschuk, Mihir M. Sanghvi, Filip Zemrak, Kenneth Fung, Jose Miguel Paiva, Valentina Carapella, Young Jin Kim, Hideaki Suzuki, Bernhard Kainz, Paul M. Matthews, Steffen E. Petersen, Stefan K. Piechnik, Stefan Neubauer, Ben Glocker, Daniel Rueckert

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a standard imaging modality for assessing cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of death globally. CMR enables accurate quantification of the cardiac chamber volume, ejection fraction and myocardial mass, providing information for diagnosis and monitoring of CVDs. However, for years, clinicians have been relying on manual approaches for CMR image analysis, which is time consuming and prone to subjective errors. It is a major clinical challenge to automatically derive quantitative and clinically relevant information from CMR images. Deep neural networks have shown a great potential in image pattern recognition and segmentation for a variety of tasks. Here we demonstrate an automated analysis method for CMR images, which is based on a fully convolutional network (FCN). The network is trained and evaluated on a large-scale dataset from the UK Biobank, consisting of 4,875 subjects with 93,500 pixelwise annotated images. The performance of the method has been evaluated using a number of technical metrics, including the Dice metric, mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance, as well as clinically relevant measures, including left ventricle (LV) end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and end-systolic volume (LVESV), LV mass (LVM); right ventricle (RV) end-diastolic volume (RVEDV) and end-systolic volume (RVESV). By combining FCN with a large-scale annotated dataset, the proposed automated method achieves a high performance on par with human experts in segmenting the LV and RV on short-axis CMR images and the left atrium (LA) and right atrium (RA) on long-axis CMR images.

* Accepted for publication by Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 

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AllenNLP: A Deep Semantic Natural Language Processing Platform

May 31, 2018
Matt Gardner, Joel Grus, Mark Neumann, Oyvind Tafjord, Pradeep Dasigi, Nelson Liu, Matthew Peters, Michael Schmitz, Luke Zettlemoyer

This paper describes AllenNLP, a platform for research on deep learning methods in natural language understanding. AllenNLP is designed to support researchers who want to build novel language understanding models quickly and easily. It is built on top of PyTorch, allowing for dynamic computation graphs, and provides (1) a flexible data API that handles intelligent batching and padding, (2) high-level abstractions for common operations in working with text, and (3) a modular and extensible experiment framework that makes doing good science easy. It also includes reference implementations of high quality approaches for both core semantic problems (e.g. semantic role labeling (Palmer et al., 2005)) and language understanding applications (e.g. machine comprehension (Rajpurkar et al., 2016)). AllenNLP is an ongoing open-source effort maintained by engineers and researchers at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence.

* Describes the initial version of AllenNLP. Many features and models have been added since the first release. This is the paper to cite if you use AllenNLP in your research. Updated 5/31/2018 with version accepted to the NLP OSS workshop help at ACL 2018 

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Construction of the Literature Graph in Semantic Scholar

May 06, 2018
Waleed Ammar, Dirk Groeneveld, Chandra Bhagavatula, Iz Beltagy, Miles Crawford, Doug Downey, Jason Dunkelberger, Ahmed Elgohary, Sergey Feldman, Vu Ha, Rodney Kinney, Sebastian Kohlmeier, Kyle Lo, Tyler Murray, Hsu-Han Ooi, Matthew Peters, Joanna Power, Sam Skjonsberg, Lucy Lu Wang, Chris Wilhelm, Zheng Yuan, Madeleine van Zuylen, Oren Etzioni

We describe a deployed scalable system for organizing published scientific literature into a heterogeneous graph to facilitate algorithmic manipulation and discovery. The resulting literature graph consists of more than 280M nodes, representing papers, authors, entities and various interactions between them (e.g., authorships, citations, entity mentions). We reduce literature graph construction into familiar NLP tasks (e.g., entity extraction and linking), point out research challenges due to differences from standard formulations of these tasks, and report empirical results for each task. The methods described in this paper are used to enable semantic features in www.semanticscholar.org

* To appear in NAACL 2018 industry track 

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Self-Supervised Learning for Cardiac MR Image Segmentation by Anatomical Position Prediction

Jul 05, 2019
Wenjia Bai, Chen Chen, Giacomo Tarroni, Jinming Duan, Florian Guitton, Steffen E. Petersen, Yike Guo, Paul M. Matthews, Daniel Rueckert

In the recent years, convolutional neural networks have transformed the field of medical image analysis due to their capacity to learn discriminative image features for a variety of classification and regression tasks. However, successfully learning these features requires a large amount of manually annotated data, which is expensive to acquire and limited by the available resources of expert image analysts. Therefore, unsupervised, weakly-supervised and self-supervised feature learning techniques receive a lot of attention, which aim to utilise the vast amount of available data, while at the same time avoid or substantially reduce the effort of manual annotation. In this paper, we propose a novel way for training a cardiac MR image segmentation network, in which features are learnt in a self-supervised manner by predicting anatomical positions. The anatomical positions serve as a supervisory signal and do not require extra manual annotation. We demonstrate that this seemingly simple task provides a strong signal for feature learning and with self-supervised learning, we achieve a high segmentation accuracy that is better than or comparable to a U-net trained from scratch, especially at a small data setting. When only five annotated subjects are available, the proposed method improves the mean Dice metric from 0.811 to 0.852 for short-axis image segmentation, compared to the baseline U-net.

* Accepted by MICCAI 2019 

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Counterfactual Vision-and-Language Navigation via Adversarial Path Sampling

Nov 17, 2019
Tsu-Jui Fu, Xin Wang, Matthew Peterson, Scott Grafton, Miguel Eckstein, William Yang Wang

Vision-and-Language Navigation (VLN) is a task where agents must decide how to move through a 3D environment to reach a goal by grounding natural language instructions to the visual surroundings. One of the problems of the VLN task is data scarcity since it is difficult to collect enough navigation paths with human-annotated instructions for interactive environments. In this paper, we explore the use of counterfactual thinking as a human-inspired data augmentation method that results in robust models. Counterfactual thinking is a concept that describes the human propensity to create possible alternatives to life events that have already occurred. We propose an adversarial-driven counterfactual reasoning model that can consider effective conditions instead of low-quality augmented data. In particular, we present a model-agnostic adversarial path sampler (APS) that learns to sample challenging paths that force the navigator to improve based on the navigation performance. APS also serves to do pre-exploration of unseen environments to strengthen the model's ability to generalize. We evaluate the influence of APS on the performance of different VLN baseline models using the room-to-room dataset (R2R). The results show that the adversarial training process with our proposed APS benefits VLN models under both seen and unseen environments. And the pre-exploration process can further gain additional improvements under unseen environments.

* 10 pages 

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The state of the art in kidney and kidney tumor segmentation in contrast-enhanced CT imaging: Results of the KiTS19 Challenge

Dec 02, 2019
Nicholas Heller, Fabian Isensee, Klaus H. Maier-Hein, Xiaoshuai Hou, Chunmei Xie, Fengyi Li, Yang Nan, Guangrui Mu, Zhiyong Lin, Miofei Han, Guang Yao, Yaozong Gao, Yao Zhang, Yixin Wang, Feng Hou, Jiawei Yang, Guangwei Xiong, Jiang Tian, Cheng Zhong, Jun Ma, Jack Rickman, Joshua Dean, Bethany Stai, Resha Tejpaul, Makinna Oestreich, Paul Blake, Heather Kaluzniak, Shaneabbas Raza, Joel Rosenberg, Keenan Moore, Edward Walczak, Zachary Rengel, Zach Edgerton, Ranveer Vasdev, Matthew Peterson, Sean McSweeney, Sarah Peterson, Arveen Kalapara, Niranjan Sathianathen, Christopher Weight, Nikolaos Papanikolopoulos

There is a large body of literature linking anatomic and geometric characteristics of kidney tumors to perioperative and oncologic outcomes. Semantic segmentation of these tumors and their host kidneys is a promising tool for quantitatively characterizing these lesions, but its adoption is limited due to the manual effort required to produce high-quality 3D segmentations of these structures. Recently, methods based on deep learning have shown excellent results in automatic 3D segmentation, but they require large datasets for training, and there remains little consensus on which methods perform best. The 2019 Kidney and Kidney Tumor Segmentation challenge (KiTS19) was a competition held in conjunction with the 2019 International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI) which sought to address these issues and stimulate progress on this automatic segmentation problem. A training set of 210 cross sectional CT images with kidney tumors was publicly released with corresponding semantic segmentation masks. 106 teams from five continents used this data to develop automated systems to predict the true segmentation masks on a test set of 90 CT images for which the corresponding ground truth segmentations were kept private. These predictions were scored and ranked according to their average So rensen-Dice coefficient between the kidney and tumor across all 90 cases. The winning team achieved a Dice of 0.974 for kidney and 0.851 for tumor, approaching the inter-annotator performance on kidney (0.983) but falling short on tumor (0.923). This challenge has now entered an "open leaderboard" phase where it serves as a challenging benchmark in 3D semantic segmentation.

* 18 pages, 7 figures 

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