Research papers and code for "Meryem M'hamdi":
Most work in text classification and Natural Language Processing (NLP) focuses on English or a handful of other languages that have text corpora of hundreds of millions of words. This is creating a new version of the digital divide: the artificial intelligence (AI) divide. Transfer-based approaches, such as Cross-Lingual Text Classification (CLTC) - the task of categorizing texts written in different languages into a common taxonomy, are a promising solution to the emerging AI divide. Recent work on CLTC has focused on demonstrating the benefits of using bilingual word embeddings as features, relegating the CLTC problem to a mere benchmark based on a simple averaged perceptron. In this paper, we explore more extensively and systematically two flavors of the CLTC problem: news topic classification and textual churn intent detection (TCID) in social media. In particular, we test the hypothesis that embeddings with context are more effective, by multi-tasking the learning of multilingual word embeddings and text classification; we explore neural architectures for CLTC; and we move from bi- to multi-lingual word embeddings. For all architectures, types of word embeddings and datasets, we notice a consistent gain trend in favor of multilingual joint training, especially for low-resourced languages.

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We propose a new method to detect when users express the intent to leave a service, also known as churn. While previous work focuses solely on social media, we show that this intent can be detected in chatbot conversations. As companies increasingly rely on chatbots they need an overview of potentially churny users. To this end, we crowdsource and publish a dataset of churn intent expressions in chatbot interactions in German and English. We show that classifiers trained on social media data can detect the same intent in the context of chatbots. We introduce a classification architecture that outperforms existing work on churn intent detection in social media. Moreover, we show that, using bilingual word embeddings, a system trained on combined English and German data outperforms monolingual approaches. As the only existing dataset is in English, we crowdsource and publish a novel dataset of German tweets. We thus underline the universal aspect of the problem, as examples of churn intent in English help us identify churn in German tweets and chatbot conversations.

* 10 pages
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