Models, code, and papers for "Pavlo Molchanov":

Budget-Aware Activity Detection with A Recurrent Policy Network

May 08, 2018
Behrooz Mahasseni, Xiaodong Yang, Pavlo Molchanov, Jan Kautz

In this paper, we address the challenging problem of efficient temporal activity detection in untrimmed long videos. While most recent work has focused and advanced the detection accuracy, the inference time can take seconds to minutes in processing each single video, which is too slow to be useful in real-world settings. This motivates the proposed budget-aware framework, which learns to perform activity detection by intelligently selecting a small subset of frames according to a specified time budget. We formulate this problem as a Markov decision process, and adopt a recurrent network to model the frame selection policy. We derive a recurrent policy gradient based approach to approximate the gradient of the non-decomposable and non-differentiable objective defined in our problem. In the extensive experiments, we achieve competitive detection accuracy, and more importantly, our approach is able to substantially reduce computation time and detect multiple activities with only 0.35s for each untrimmed long video.


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Importance Estimation for Neural Network Pruning

Jun 25, 2019
Pavlo Molchanov, Arun Mallya, Stephen Tyree, Iuri Frosio, Jan Kautz

Structural pruning of neural network parameters reduces computation, energy, and memory transfer costs during inference. We propose a novel method that estimates the contribution of a neuron (filter) to the final loss and iteratively removes those with smaller scores. We describe two variations of our method using the first and second-order Taylor expansions to approximate a filter's contribution. Both methods scale consistently across any network layer without requiring per-layer sensitivity analysis and can be applied to any kind of layer, including skip connections. For modern networks trained on ImageNet, we measured experimentally a high (>93%) correlation between the contribution computed by our methods and a reliable estimate of the true importance. Pruning with the proposed methods leads to an improvement over state-of-the-art in terms of accuracy, FLOPs, and parameter reduction. On ResNet-101, we achieve a 40% FLOPS reduction by removing 30% of the parameters, with a loss of 0.02% in the top-1 accuracy on ImageNet. Code is available at https://github.com/NVlabs/Taylor_pruning.


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Hand Pose Estimation via Latent 2.5D Heatmap Regression

Apr 25, 2018
Umar Iqbal, Pavlo Molchanov, Thomas Breuel, Juergen Gall, Jan Kautz

Estimating the 3D pose of a hand is an essential part of human-computer interaction. Estimating 3D pose using depth or multi-view sensors has become easier with recent advances in computer vision, however, regressing pose from a single RGB image is much less straightforward. The main difficulty arises from the fact that 3D pose requires some form of depth estimates, which are ambiguous given only an RGB image. In this paper we propose a new method for 3D hand pose estimation from a monocular image through a novel 2.5D pose representation. Our new representation estimates pose up to a scaling factor, which can be estimated additionally if a prior of the hand size is given. We implicitly learn depth maps and heatmap distributions with a novel CNN architecture. Our system achieves the state-of-the-art estimation of 2D and 3D hand pose on several challenging datasets in presence of severe occlusions.


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Pruning Convolutional Neural Networks for Resource Efficient Inference

Jun 08, 2017
Pavlo Molchanov, Stephen Tyree, Tero Karras, Timo Aila, Jan Kautz

We propose a new formulation for pruning convolutional kernels in neural networks to enable efficient inference. We interleave greedy criteria-based pruning with fine-tuning by backpropagation - a computationally efficient procedure that maintains good generalization in the pruned network. We propose a new criterion based on Taylor expansion that approximates the change in the cost function induced by pruning network parameters. We focus on transfer learning, where large pretrained networks are adapted to specialized tasks. The proposed criterion demonstrates superior performance compared to other criteria, e.g. the norm of kernel weights or feature map activation, for pruning large CNNs after adaptation to fine-grained classification tasks (Birds-200 and Flowers-102) relaying only on the first order gradient information. We also show that pruning can lead to more than 10x theoretical (5x practical) reduction in adapted 3D-convolutional filters with a small drop in accuracy in a recurrent gesture classifier. Finally, we show results for the large-scale ImageNet dataset to emphasize the flexibility of our approach.

* 17 pages, 14 figures, ICLR 2017 paper 

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Improving Landmark Localization with Semi-Supervised Learning

Oct 28, 2018
Sina Honari, Pavlo Molchanov, Stephen Tyree, Pascal Vincent, Christopher Pal, Jan Kautz

We present two techniques to improve landmark localization in images from partially annotated datasets. Our primary goal is to leverage the common situation where precise landmark locations are only provided for a small data subset, but where class labels for classification or regression tasks related to the landmarks are more abundantly available. First, we propose the framework of sequential multitasking and explore it here through an architecture for landmark localization where training with class labels acts as an auxiliary signal to guide the landmark localization on unlabeled data. A key aspect of our approach is that errors can be backpropagated through a complete landmark localization model. Second, we propose and explore an unsupervised learning technique for landmark localization based on having a model predict equivariant landmarks with respect to transformations applied to the image. We show that these techniques, improve landmark prediction considerably and can learn effective detectors even when only a small fraction of the dataset has landmark labels. We present results on two toy datasets and four real datasets, with hands and faces, and report new state-of-the-art on two datasets in the wild, e.g. with only 5\% of labeled images we outperform previous state-of-the-art trained on the AFLW dataset.

* Published as a conference paper in CVPR 2018 

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IamNN: Iterative and Adaptive Mobile Neural Network for Efficient Image Classification

Apr 26, 2018
Sam Leroux, Pavlo Molchanov, Pieter Simoens, Bart Dhoedt, Thomas Breuel, Jan Kautz

Deep residual networks (ResNets) made a recent breakthrough in deep learning. The core idea of ResNets is to have shortcut connections between layers that allow the network to be much deeper while still being easy to optimize avoiding vanishing gradients. These shortcut connections have interesting side-effects that make ResNets behave differently from other typical network architectures. In this work we use these properties to design a network based on a ResNet but with parameter sharing and with adaptive computation time. The resulting network is much smaller than the original network and can adapt the computational cost to the complexity of the input image.

* ICLR 2018 Workshop track 

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A Lightweight Approach for On-the-Fly Reflectance Estimation

Apr 02, 2018
Kihwan Kim, Jinwei Gu, Stephen Tyree, Pavlo Molchanov, Matthias Nießner, Jan Kautz

Estimating surface reflectance (BRDF) is one key component for complete 3D scene capture, with wide applications in virtual reality, augmented reality, and human computer interaction. Prior work is either limited to controlled environments (\eg gonioreflectometers, light stages, or multi-camera domes), or requires the joint optimization of shape, illumination, and reflectance, which is often computationally too expensive (\eg hours of running time) for real-time applications. Moreover, most prior work requires HDR images as input which further complicates the capture process. In this paper, we propose a lightweight approach for surface reflectance estimation directly from $8$-bit RGB images in real-time, which can be easily plugged into any 3D scanning-and-fusion system with a commodity RGBD sensor. Our method is learning-based, with an inference time of less than 90ms per scene and a model size of less than 340K bytes. We propose two novel network architectures, HemiCNN and Grouplet, to deal with the unstructured input data from multiple viewpoints under unknown illumination. We further design a loss function to resolve the color-constancy and scale ambiguity. In addition, we have created a large synthetic dataset, SynBRDF, which comprises a total of $500$K RGBD images rendered with a physically-based ray tracer under a variety of natural illumination, covering $5000$ materials and $5000$ shapes. SynBRDF is the first large-scale benchmark dataset for reflectance estimation. Experiments on both synthetic data and real data show that the proposed method effectively recovers surface reflectance, and outperforms prior work for reflectance estimation in uncontrolled environments.

* ICCV 2017 

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Few-shot Adaptive Gaze Estimation

May 06, 2019
Seonwook Park, Shalini De Mello, Pavlo Molchanov, Umar Iqbal, Otmar Hilliges, Jan Kautz

Inter-personal anatomical differences limit the accuracy of person-independent gaze estimation networks. Yet there is a need to lower gaze errors further to enable applications requiring higher quality. Further gains can be achieved by personalizing gaze networks, ideally with few calibration samples. However, over-parameterized neural networks are not amenable to learning from few examples as they can quickly over-fit. We embrace these challenges and propose a novel framework for Few-shot Adaptive GaZE Estimation (FAZE) for learning person-specific gaze networks with very few (less than 9) calibration samples. FAZE learns a rotation-aware latent representation of gaze via a disentangling encoder-decoder architecture along with a highly adaptable gaze estimator trained using meta-learning. It is capable of adapting to any new person to yield significant performance gains with as few as 3 samples, yielding state-of-the-art performance of 3.18-deg on GazeCapture, a 19% improvement over prior art.


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SCOPS: Self-Supervised Co-Part Segmentation

May 03, 2019
Wei-Chih Hung, Varun Jampani, Sifei Liu, Pavlo Molchanov, Ming-Hsuan Yang, Jan Kautz

Parts provide a good intermediate representation of objects that is robust with respect to the camera, pose and appearance variations. Existing works on part segmentation is dominated by supervised approaches that rely on large amounts of manual annotations and can not generalize to unseen object categories. We propose a self-supervised deep learning approach for part segmentation, where we devise several loss functions that aids in predicting part segments that are geometrically concentrated, robust to object variations and are also semantically consistent across different object instances. Extensive experiments on different types of image collections demonstrate that our approach can produce part segments that adhere to object boundaries and also more semantically consistent across object instances compared to existing self-supervised techniques.

* Accepted in CVPR 2019. Project page: http://varunjampani.github.io/scops 

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Dreaming to Distill: Data-free Knowledge Transfer via DeepInversion

Dec 18, 2019
Hongxu Yin, Pavlo Molchanov, Zhizhong Li, Jose M. Alvarez, Arun Mallya, Derek Hoiem, Niraj K. Jha, Jan Kautz

We introduce DeepInversion, a new method for synthesizing images from the image distribution used to train a deep neural network. We 'invert' a trained network (teacher) to synthesize class-conditional input images starting from random noise, without using any additional information about the training dataset. Keeping the teacher fixed, our method optimizes the input while regularizing the distribution of intermediate feature maps using information stored in the batch normalization layers of the teacher. Further, we improve the diversity of synthesized images using Adaptive DeepInversion, which maximizes the Jensen-Shannon divergence between the teacher and student network logits. The resulting synthesized images from networks trained on the CIFAR-10 and ImageNet datasets demonstrate high fidelity and degree of realism, and help enable a new breed of data-free applications - ones that do not require any real images or labeled data. We demonstrate the applicability of our proposed method to three tasks of immense practical importance -- (i) data-free network pruning, (ii) data-free knowledge transfer, and (iii) data-free continual learning.


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Boosting segmentation with weak supervision from image-to-image translation

Apr 04, 2019
Eugene Vorontsov, Pavlo Molchanov, Wonmin Byeon, Shalini De Mello, Varun Jampani, Ming-Yu Liu, Samuel Kadoury, Jan Kautz

In many cases, especially with medical images, it is prohibitively challenging to produce a sufficiently large training sample of pixel-level annotations to train deep neural networks for semantic image segmentation. On the other hand, some information is often known about the contents of images. We leverage information on whether an image presents the segmentation target or whether it is absent from the image to improve segmentation performance by augmenting the amount of data usable for model training. Specifically, we propose a semi-supervised framework that employs image-to-image translation between weak labels (e.g., presence vs. absence of cancer), in addition to fully supervised segmentation on some examples. We conjecture that this translation objective is well aligned with the segmentation objective as both require the same disentangling of image variations. Building on prior image-to-image translation work, we re-use the encoder and decoders for translating in either direction between two domains, employing a strategy of selectively decoding domain-specific variations. For presence vs. absence domains, the encoder produces variations that are common to both and those unique to the presence domain. Furthermore, we successfully re-use one of the decoders used in translation for segmentation. We validate the proposed method on synthetic tasks of varying difficulty as well as on the real task of brain tumor segmentation in magnetic resonance images, where we show significant improvements over standard semi-supervised training with autoencoding.


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HarDNN: Feature Map Vulnerability Evaluation in CNNs

Feb 22, 2020
Abdulrahman Mahmoud, Siva Kumar Sastry Hari, Christopher W. Fletcher, Sarita V. Adve, Charbel Sakr, Naresh Shanbhag, Pavlo Molchanov, Michael B. Sullivan, Timothy Tsai, Stephen W. Keckler

As Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) are increasingly being employed in safety-critical applications, it is important that they behave reliably in the face of hardware errors. Transient hardware errors may percolate undesirable state during execution, resulting in software-manifested errors which can adversely affect high-level decision making. This paper presents HarDNN, a software-directed approach to identify vulnerable computations during a CNN inference and selectively protect them based on their propensity towards corrupting the inference output in the presence of a hardware error. We show that HarDNN can accurately estimate relative vulnerability of a feature map (fmap) in CNNs using a statistical error injection campaign, and explore heuristics for fast vulnerability assessment. Based on these results, we analyze the tradeoff between error coverage and computational overhead that the system designers can use to employ selective protection. Results show that the improvement in resilience for the added computation is superlinear with HarDNN. For example, HarDNN improves SqueezeNet's resilience by 10x with just 30% additional computations.

* 14 pages, 5 figures, a short version accepted for publication in First Workshop on Secure and Resilient Autonomy (SARA) co-located with MLSys2020 

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Depth-Based 3D Hand Pose Estimation: From Current Achievements to Future Goals

Mar 29, 2018
Shanxin Yuan, Guillermo Garcia-Hernando, Bjorn Stenger, Gyeongsik Moon, Ju Yong Chang, Kyoung Mu Lee, Pavlo Molchanov, Jan Kautz, Sina Honari, Liuhao Ge, Junsong Yuan, Xinghao Chen, Guijin Wang, Fan Yang, Kai Akiyama, Yang Wu, Qingfu Wan, Meysam Madadi, Sergio Escalera, Shile Li, Dongheui Lee, Iason Oikonomidis, Antonis Argyros, Tae-Kyun Kim

In this paper, we strive to answer two questions: What is the current state of 3D hand pose estimation from depth images? And, what are the next challenges that need to be tackled? Following the successful Hands In the Million Challenge (HIM2017), we investigate the top 10 state-of-the-art methods on three tasks: single frame 3D pose estimation, 3D hand tracking, and hand pose estimation during object interaction. We analyze the performance of different CNN structures with regard to hand shape, joint visibility, view point and articulation distributions. Our findings include: (1) isolated 3D hand pose estimation achieves low mean errors (10 mm) in the view point range of [70, 120] degrees, but it is far from being solved for extreme view points; (2) 3D volumetric representations outperform 2D CNNs, better capturing the spatial structure of the depth data; (3) Discriminative methods still generalize poorly to unseen hand shapes; (4) While joint occlusions pose a challenge for most methods, explicit modeling of structure constraints can significantly narrow the gap between errors on visible and occluded joints.


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