Models, code, and papers for "Rajat Monga":

Deep Networks With Large Output Spaces

Apr 10, 2015
Sudheendra Vijayanarasimhan, Jonathon Shlens, Rajat Monga, Jay Yagnik

Deep neural networks have been extremely successful at various image, speech, video recognition tasks because of their ability to model deep structures within the data. However, they are still prohibitively expensive to train and apply for problems containing millions of classes in the output layer. Based on the observation that the key computation common to most neural network layers is a vector/matrix product, we propose a fast locality-sensitive hashing technique to approximate the actual dot product enabling us to scale up the training and inference to millions of output classes. We evaluate our technique on three diverse large-scale recognition tasks and show that our approach can train large-scale models at a faster rate (in terms of steps/total time) compared to baseline methods.


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Revisiting Distributed Synchronous SGD

Mar 21, 2017
Jianmin Chen, Xinghao Pan, Rajat Monga, Samy Bengio, Rafal Jozefowicz

Distributed training of deep learning models on large-scale training data is typically conducted with asynchronous stochastic optimization to maximize the rate of updates, at the cost of additional noise introduced from asynchrony. In contrast, the synchronous approach is often thought to be impractical due to idle time wasted on waiting for straggling workers. We revisit these conventional beliefs in this paper, and examine the weaknesses of both approaches. We demonstrate that a third approach, synchronous optimization with backup workers, can avoid asynchronous noise while mitigating for the worst stragglers. Our approach is empirically validated and shown to converge faster and to better test accuracies.

* 10 pages 

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Beyond Short Snippets: Deep Networks for Video Classification

Apr 13, 2015
Joe Yue-Hei Ng, Matthew Hausknecht, Sudheendra Vijayanarasimhan, Oriol Vinyals, Rajat Monga, George Toderici

Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have been extensively applied for image recognition problems giving state-of-the-art results on recognition, detection, segmentation and retrieval. In this work we propose and evaluate several deep neural network architectures to combine image information across a video over longer time periods than previously attempted. We propose two methods capable of handling full length videos. The first method explores various convolutional temporal feature pooling architectures, examining the various design choices which need to be made when adapting a CNN for this task. The second proposed method explicitly models the video as an ordered sequence of frames. For this purpose we employ a recurrent neural network that uses Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) cells which are connected to the output of the underlying CNN. Our best networks exhibit significant performance improvements over previously published results on the Sports 1 million dataset (73.1% vs. 60.9%) and the UCF-101 datasets with (88.6% vs. 88.0%) and without additional optical flow information (82.6% vs. 72.8%).


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Building high-level features using large scale unsupervised learning

Jul 12, 2012
Quoc V. Le, Marc'Aurelio Ranzato, Rajat Monga, Matthieu Devin, Kai Chen, Greg S. Corrado, Jeff Dean, Andrew Y. Ng

We consider the problem of building high-level, class-specific feature detectors from only unlabeled data. For example, is it possible to learn a face detector using only unlabeled images? To answer this, we train a 9-layered locally connected sparse autoencoder with pooling and local contrast normalization on a large dataset of images (the model has 1 billion connections, the dataset has 10 million 200x200 pixel images downloaded from the Internet). We train this network using model parallelism and asynchronous SGD on a cluster with 1,000 machines (16,000 cores) for three days. Contrary to what appears to be a widely-held intuition, our experimental results reveal that it is possible to train a face detector without having to label images as containing a face or not. Control experiments show that this feature detector is robust not only to translation but also to scaling and out-of-plane rotation. We also find that the same network is sensitive to other high-level concepts such as cat faces and human bodies. Starting with these learned features, we trained our network to obtain 15.8% accuracy in recognizing 20,000 object categories from ImageNet, a leap of 70% relative improvement over the previous state-of-the-art.


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TensorFlow Eager: A Multi-Stage, Python-Embedded DSL for Machine Learning

Feb 27, 2019
Akshay Agrawal, Akshay Naresh Modi, Alexandre Passos, Allen Lavoie, Ashish Agarwal, Asim Shankar, Igor Ganichev, Josh Levenberg, Mingsheng Hong, Rajat Monga, Shanqing Cai

TensorFlow Eager is a multi-stage, Python-embedded domain-specific language for hardware-accelerated machine learning, suitable for both interactive research and production. TensorFlow, which TensorFlow Eager extends, requires users to represent computations as dataflow graphs; this permits compiler optimizations and simplifies deployment but hinders rapid prototyping and run-time dynamism. TensorFlow Eager eliminates these usability costs without sacrificing the benefits furnished by graphs: It provides an imperative front-end to TensorFlow that executes operations immediately and a JIT tracer that translates Python functions composed of TensorFlow operations into executable dataflow graphs. TensorFlow Eager thus offers a multi-stage programming model that makes it easy to interpolate between imperative and staged execution in a single package.

* Proc. of the 2nd SysML Conference, 2019 

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Dynamic Control Flow in Large-Scale Machine Learning

May 04, 2018
Yuan Yu, Martín Abadi, Paul Barham, Eugene Brevdo, Mike Burrows, Andy Davis, Jeff Dean, Sanjay Ghemawat, Tim Harley, Peter Hawkins, Michael Isard, Manjunath Kudlur, Rajat Monga, Derek Murray, Xiaoqiang Zheng

Many recent machine learning models rely on fine-grained dynamic control flow for training and inference. In particular, models based on recurrent neural networks and on reinforcement learning depend on recurrence relations, data-dependent conditional execution, and other features that call for dynamic control flow. These applications benefit from the ability to make rapid control-flow decisions across a set of computing devices in a distributed system. For performance, scalability, and expressiveness, a machine learning system must support dynamic control flow in distributed and heterogeneous environments. This paper presents a programming model for distributed machine learning that supports dynamic control flow. We describe the design of the programming model, and its implementation in TensorFlow, a distributed machine learning system. Our approach extends the use of dataflow graphs to represent machine learning models, offering several distinctive features. First, the branches of conditionals and bodies of loops can be partitioned across many machines to run on a set of heterogeneous devices, including CPUs, GPUs, and custom ASICs. Second, programs written in our model support automatic differentiation and distributed gradient computations, which are necessary for training machine learning models that use control flow. Third, our choice of non-strict semantics enables multiple loop iterations to execute in parallel across machines, and to overlap compute and I/O operations. We have done our work in the context of TensorFlow, and it has been used extensively in research and production. We evaluate it using several real-world applications, and demonstrate its performance and scalability.

* EuroSys 2018: Thirteenth EuroSys Conference, April 23-26, 2018, Porto, Portugal. ACM, New York, NY, USA 
* Appeared in EuroSys 2018. 14 pages, 16 figures 

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TensorFlow.js: Machine Learning for the Web and Beyond

Jan 16, 2019
Daniel Smilkov, Nikhil Thorat, Yannick Assogba, Ann Yuan, Nick Kreeger, Ping Yu, Kangyi Zhang, Shanqing Cai, Eric Nielsen, David Soergel, Stan Bileschi, Michael Terry, Charles Nicholson, Sandeep N. Gupta, Sarah Sirajuddin, D. Sculley, Rajat Monga, Greg Corrado, Fernanda B. Viegas, Martin Wattenberg

TensorFlow.js is a library for building and executing machine learning algorithms in JavaScript. TensorFlow.js models run in a web browser and in the Node.js environment. The library is part of the TensorFlow ecosystem, providing a set of APIs that are compatible with those in Python, allowing models to be ported between the Python and JavaScript ecosystems. TensorFlow.js has empowered a new set of developers from the extensive JavaScript community to build and deploy machine learning models and enabled new classes of on-device computation. This paper describes the design, API, and implementation of TensorFlow.js, and highlights some of the impactful use cases.

* 10 pages 

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TensorFlow: A system for large-scale machine learning

May 31, 2016
Martín Abadi, Paul Barham, Jianmin Chen, Zhifeng Chen, Andy Davis, Jeffrey Dean, Matthieu Devin, Sanjay Ghemawat, Geoffrey Irving, Michael Isard, Manjunath Kudlur, Josh Levenberg, Rajat Monga, Sherry Moore, Derek G. Murray, Benoit Steiner, Paul Tucker, Vijay Vasudevan, Pete Warden, Martin Wicke, Yuan Yu, Xiaoqiang Zheng

TensorFlow is a machine learning system that operates at large scale and in heterogeneous environments. TensorFlow uses dataflow graphs to represent computation, shared state, and the operations that mutate that state. It maps the nodes of a dataflow graph across many machines in a cluster, and within a machine across multiple computational devices, including multicore CPUs, general-purpose GPUs, and custom designed ASICs known as Tensor Processing Units (TPUs). This architecture gives flexibility to the application developer: whereas in previous "parameter server" designs the management of shared state is built into the system, TensorFlow enables developers to experiment with novel optimizations and training algorithms. TensorFlow supports a variety of applications, with particularly strong support for training and inference on deep neural networks. Several Google services use TensorFlow in production, we have released it as an open-source project, and it has become widely used for machine learning research. In this paper, we describe the TensorFlow dataflow model in contrast to existing systems, and demonstrate the compelling performance that TensorFlow achieves for several real-world applications.

* 18 pages, 9 figures; v2 has a spelling correction in the metadata 

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TensorFlow: Large-Scale Machine Learning on Heterogeneous Distributed Systems

Mar 16, 2016
Martín Abadi, Ashish Agarwal, Paul Barham, Eugene Brevdo, Zhifeng Chen, Craig Citro, Greg S. Corrado, Andy Davis, Jeffrey Dean, Matthieu Devin, Sanjay Ghemawat, Ian Goodfellow, Andrew Harp, Geoffrey Irving, Michael Isard, Yangqing Jia, Rafal Jozefowicz, Lukasz Kaiser, Manjunath Kudlur, Josh Levenberg, Dan Mane, Rajat Monga, Sherry Moore, Derek Murray, Chris Olah, Mike Schuster, Jonathon Shlens, Benoit Steiner, Ilya Sutskever, Kunal Talwar, Paul Tucker, Vincent Vanhoucke, Vijay Vasudevan, Fernanda Viegas, Oriol Vinyals, Pete Warden, Martin Wattenberg, Martin Wicke, Yuan Yu, Xiaoqiang Zheng

TensorFlow is an interface for expressing machine learning algorithms, and an implementation for executing such algorithms. A computation expressed using TensorFlow can be executed with little or no change on a wide variety of heterogeneous systems, ranging from mobile devices such as phones and tablets up to large-scale distributed systems of hundreds of machines and thousands of computational devices such as GPU cards. The system is flexible and can be used to express a wide variety of algorithms, including training and inference algorithms for deep neural network models, and it has been used for conducting research and for deploying machine learning systems into production across more than a dozen areas of computer science and other fields, including speech recognition, computer vision, robotics, information retrieval, natural language processing, geographic information extraction, and computational drug discovery. This paper describes the TensorFlow interface and an implementation of that interface that we have built at Google. The TensorFlow API and a reference implementation were released as an open-source package under the Apache 2.0 license in November, 2015 and are available at www.tensorflow.org.

* Version 2 updates only the metadata, to correct the formatting of Mart\'in Abadi's name 

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SysML: The New Frontier of Machine Learning Systems

Mar 29, 2019
Alexander Ratner, Dan Alistarh, Gustavo Alonso, Peter Bailis, Sarah Bird, Nicholas Carlini, Bryan Catanzaro, Eric Chung, Bill Dally, Jeff Dean, Inderjit S. Dhillon, Alexandros Dimakis, Pradeep Dubey, Charles Elkan, Grigori Fursin, Gregory R. Ganger, Lise Getoor, Phillip B. Gibbons, Garth A. Gibson, Joseph E. Gonzalez, Justin Gottschlich, Song Han, Kim Hazelwood, Furong Huang, Martin Jaggi, Kevin Jamieson, Michael I. Jordan, Gauri Joshi, Rania Khalaf, Jason Knight, Jakub Konečný, Tim Kraska, Arun Kumar, Anastasios Kyrillidis, Jing Li, Samuel Madden, H. Brendan McMahan, Erik Meijer, Ioannis Mitliagkas, Rajat Monga, Derek Murray, Dimitris Papailiopoulos, Gennady Pekhimenko, Theodoros Rekatsinas, Afshin Rostamizadeh, Christopher Ré, Christopher De Sa, Hanie Sedghi, Siddhartha Sen, Virginia Smith, Alex Smola, Dawn Song, Evan Sparks, Ion Stoica, Vivienne Sze, Madeleine Udell, Joaquin Vanschoren, Shivaram Venkataraman, Rashmi Vinayak, Markus Weimer, Andrew Gordon Wilson, Eric Xing, Matei Zaharia, Ce Zhang, Ameet Talwalkar

Machine learning (ML) techniques are enjoying rapidly increasing adoption. However, designing and implementing the systems that support ML models in real-world deployments remains a significant obstacle, in large part due to the radically different development and deployment profile of modern ML methods, and the range of practical concerns that come with broader adoption. We propose to foster a new systems machine learning research community at the intersection of the traditional systems and ML communities, focused on topics such as hardware systems for ML, software systems for ML, and ML optimized for metrics beyond predictive accuracy. To do this, we describe a new conference, SysML, that explicitly targets research at the intersection of systems and machine learning with a program committee split evenly between experts in systems and ML, and an explicit focus on topics at the intersection of the two.


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