Models, code, and papers for "Rodrigo F. Berriel":

Ego-Lane Analysis System (ELAS): Dataset and Algorithms

Jun 15, 2018
Rodrigo F. Berriel, Edilson de Aguiar, Alberto F. de Souza, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

Decreasing costs of vision sensors and advances in embedded hardware boosted lane related research detection, estimation, and tracking in the past two decades. The interest in this topic has increased even more with the demand for advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and self-driving cars. Although extensively studied independently, there is still need for studies that propose a combined solution for the multiple problems related to the ego-lane, such as lane departure warning (LDW), lane change detection, lane marking type (LMT) classification, road markings detection and classification, and detection of adjacent lanes (i.e., immediate left and right lanes) presence. In this paper, we propose a real-time Ego-Lane Analysis System (ELAS) capable of estimating ego-lane position, classifying LMTs and road markings, performing LDW and detecting lane change events. The proposed vision-based system works on a temporal sequence of images. Lane marking features are extracted in perspective and Inverse Perspective Mapping (IPM) images that are combined to increase robustness. The final estimated lane is modeled as a spline using a combination of methods (Hough lines with Kalman filter and spline with particle filter). Based on the estimated lane, all other events are detected. To validate ELAS and cover the lack of lane datasets in the literature, a new dataset with more than 20 different scenes (in more than 15,000 frames) and considering a variety of scenarios (urban road, highways, traffic, shadows, etc.) was created. The dataset was manually annotated and made publicly available to enable evaluation of several events that are of interest for the research community (i.e., lane estimation, change, and centering; road markings; intersections; LMTs; crosswalks and adjacent lanes). ELAS achieved high detection rates in all real-world events and proved to be ready for real-time applications.

* Image and Vision Computing 68 (2017) 64-75 
* 13 pages, 17 figures, github.com/rodrigoberriel/ego-lane-analysis-system, and published by Image and Vision Computing (IMAVIS) 

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Automatic Large-Scale Data Acquisition via Crowdsourcing for Crosswalk Classification: A Deep Learning Approach

May 30, 2018
Rodrigo F. Berriel, Franco Schmidt Rossi, Alberto F. de Souza, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

Correctly identifying crosswalks is an essential task for the driving activity and mobility autonomy. Many crosswalk classification, detection and localization systems have been proposed in the literature over the years. These systems use different perspectives to tackle the crosswalk classification problem: satellite imagery, cockpit view (from the top of a car or behind the windshield), and pedestrian perspective. Most of the works in the literature are designed and evaluated using small and local datasets, i.e. datasets that present low diversity. Scaling to large datasets imposes a challenge for the annotation procedure. Moreover, there is still need for cross-database experiments in the literature because it is usually hard to collect the data in the same place and conditions of the final application. In this paper, we present a crosswalk classification system based on deep learning. For that, crowdsourcing platforms, such as OpenStreetMap and Google Street View, are exploited to enable automatic training via automatic acquisition and annotation of a large-scale database. Additionally, this work proposes a comparison study of models trained using fully-automatic data acquisition and annotation against models that were partially annotated. Cross-database experiments were also included in the experimentation to show that the proposed methods enable use with real world applications. Our results show that the model trained on the fully-automatic database achieved high overall accuracy (94.12%), and that a statistically significant improvement (to 96.30%) can be achieved by manually annotating a specific part of the database. Finally, the results of the cross-database experiments show that both models are robust to the many variations of image and scenarios, presenting a consistent behavior.

* Computers & Graphics, 2017, vol. 68, pp. 32-42 
* 13 pages, 13 figures, 3 videos, and GitHub with models 

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Deep Learning Based Large-Scale Automatic Satellite Crosswalk Classification

Jul 05, 2017
Rodrigo F. Berriel, Andre Teixeira Lopes, Alberto F. de Souza, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

High-resolution satellite imagery have been increasingly used on remote sensing classification problems. One of the main factors is the availability of this kind of data. Even though, very little effort has been placed on the zebra crossing classification problem. In this letter, crowdsourcing systems are exploited in order to enable the automatic acquisition and annotation of a large-scale satellite imagery database for crosswalks related tasks. Then, this dataset is used to train deep-learning-based models in order to accurately classify satellite images that contains or not zebra crossings. A novel dataset with more than 240,000 images from 3 continents, 9 countries and more than 20 cities was used in the experiments. Experimental results showed that freely available crowdsourcing data can be used to accurately (97.11%) train robust models to perform crosswalk classification on a global scale.

* 5 pages, 3 figures, accepted by IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters 

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Copycat CNN: Stealing Knowledge by Persuading Confession with Random Non-Labeled Data

Jun 14, 2018
Jacson Rodrigues Correia-Silva, Rodrigo F. Berriel, Claudine Badue, Alberto F. de Souza, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

In the past few years, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have been achieving state-of-the-art performance on a variety of problems. Many companies employ resources and money to generate these models and provide them as an API, therefore it is in their best interest to protect them, i.e., to avoid that someone else copies them. Recent studies revealed that state-of-the-art CNNs are vulnerable to adversarial examples attacks, and this weakness indicates that CNNs do not need to operate in the problem domain (PD). Therefore, we hypothesize that they also do not need to be trained with examples of the PD in order to operate in it. Given these facts, in this paper, we investigate if a target black-box CNN can be copied by persuading it to confess its knowledge through random non-labeled data. The copy is two-fold: i) the target network is queried with random data and its predictions are used to create a fake dataset with the knowledge of the network; and ii) a copycat network is trained with the fake dataset and should be able to achieve similar performance as the target network. This hypothesis was evaluated locally in three problems (facial expression, object, and crosswalk classification) and against a cloud-based API. In the copy attacks, images from both non-problem domain and PD were used. All copycat networks achieved at least 93.7% of the performance of the original models with non-problem domain data, and at least 98.6% using additional data from the PD. Additionally, the copycat CNN successfully copied at least 97.3% of the performance of the Microsoft Azure Emotion API. Our results show that it is possible to create a copycat CNN by simply querying a target network as black-box with random non-labeled data.

* 8 pages, 3 figures, accepted by IJCNN 2018 

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Cross-Domain Car Detection Using Unsupervised Image-to-Image Translation: From Day to Night

Jul 19, 2019
Vinicius F. Arruda, Thiago M. Paixão, Rodrigo F. Berriel, Alberto F. De Souza, Claudine Badue, Nicu Sebe, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

Deep learning techniques have enabled the emergence of state-of-the-art models to address object detection tasks. However, these techniques are data-driven, delegating the accuracy to the training dataset which must resemble the images in the target task. The acquisition of a dataset involves annotating images, an arduous and expensive process, generally requiring time and manual effort. Thus, a challenging scenario arises when the target domain of application has no annotated dataset available, making tasks in such situation to lean on a training dataset of a different domain. Sharing this issue, object detection is a vital task for autonomous vehicles where the large amount of driving scenarios yields several domains of application requiring annotated data for the training process. In this work, a method for training a car detection system with annotated data from a source domain (day images) without requiring the image annotations of the target domain (night images) is presented. For that, a model based on Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) is explored to enable the generation of an artificial dataset with its respective annotations. The artificial dataset (fake dataset) is created translating images from day-time domain to night-time domain. The fake dataset, which comprises annotated images of only the target domain (night images), is then used to train the car detector model. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieved significant and consistent improvements, including the increasing by more than 10% of the detection performance when compared to the training with only the available annotated data (i.e., day images).

* 8 pages, 8 figures, https://github.com/viniciusarruda/cross-domain-car-detection and accepted at IJCNN 2019 

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Effortless Deep Training for Traffic Sign Detection Using Templates and Arbitrary Natural Images

Jul 23, 2019
Lucas Tabelini Torres, Thiago M. Paixão, Rodrigo F. Berriel, Alberto F. De Souza, Claudine Badue, Nicu Sebe, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

Deep learning has been successfully applied to several problems related to autonomous driving. Often, these solutions rely on large networks that require databases of real image samples of the problem (i.e., real world) for proper training. The acquisition of such real-world data sets is not always possible in the autonomous driving context, and sometimes their annotation is not feasible (e.g., takes too long or is too expensive). Moreover, in many tasks, there is an intrinsic data imbalance that most learning-based methods struggle to cope with. It turns out that traffic sign detection is a problem in which these three issues are seen altogether. In this work, we propose a novel database generation method that requires only (i) arbitrary natural images, i.e., requires no real image from the domain of interest, and (ii) templates of the traffic signs, i.e., templates synthetically created to illustrate the appearance of the category of a traffic sign. The effortlessly generated training database is shown to be effective for the training of a deep detector (such as Faster R-CNN) on German traffic signs, achieving 95.66% of mAP on average. In addition, the proposed method is able to detect traffic signs with an average precision, recall and F1-score of about 94%, 91% and 93%, respectively. The experiments surprisingly show that detectors can be trained with simple data generation methods and without problem domain data for the background, which is in the opposite direction of the common sense for deep learning.


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Traffic Light Recognition Using Deep Learning and Prior Maps for Autonomous Cars

Jun 04, 2019
Lucas C. Possatti, Rânik Guidolini, Vinicius B. Cardoso, Rodrigo F. Berriel, Thiago M. Paixão, Claudine Badue, Alberto F. De Souza, Thiago Oliveira-Santos

Autonomous terrestrial vehicles must be capable of perceiving traffic lights and recognizing their current states to share the streets with human drivers. Most of the time, human drivers can easily identify the relevant traffic lights. To deal with this issue, a common solution for autonomous cars is to integrate recognition with prior maps. However, additional solution is required for the detection and recognition of the traffic light. Deep learning techniques have showed great performance and power of generalization including traffic related problems. Motivated by the advances in deep learning, some recent works leveraged some state-of-the-art deep detectors to locate (and further recognize) traffic lights from 2D camera images. However, none of them combine the power of the deep learning-based detectors with prior maps to recognize the state of the relevant traffic lights. Based on that, this work proposes to integrate the power of deep learning-based detection with the prior maps used by our car platform IARA (acronym for Intelligent Autonomous Robotic Automobile) to recognize the relevant traffic lights of predefined routes. The process is divided in two phases: an offline phase for map construction and traffic lights annotation; and an online phase for traffic light recognition and identification of the relevant ones. The proposed system was evaluated on five test cases (routes) in the city of Vit\'oria, each case being composed of a video sequence and a prior map with the relevant traffic lights for the route. Results showed that the proposed technique is able to correctly identify the relevant traffic light along the trajectory.

* Accepted in 2019 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN) 

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