Models, code, and papers for "Rohit Prabhavalkar":

Exploring Speech Enhancement with Generative Adversarial Networks for Robust Speech Recognition

Oct 31, 2018
Chris Donahue, Bo Li, Rohit Prabhavalkar

We investigate the effectiveness of generative adversarial networks (GANs) for speech enhancement, in the context of improving noise robustness of automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems. Prior work demonstrates that GANs can effectively suppress additive noise in raw waveform speech signals, improving perceptual quality metrics; however this technique was not justified in the context of ASR. In this work, we conduct a detailed study to measure the effectiveness of GANs in enhancing speech contaminated by both additive and reverberant noise. Motivated by recent advances in image processing, we propose operating GANs on log-Mel filterbank spectra instead of waveforms, which requires less computation and is more robust to reverberant noise. While GAN enhancement improves the performance of a clean-trained ASR system on noisy speech, it falls short of the performance achieved by conventional multi-style training (MTR). By appending the GAN-enhanced features to the noisy inputs and retraining, we achieve a 7% WER improvement relative to the MTR system.

* Published as a conference paper at ICASSP 2018 

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Exploring Architectures, Data and Units For Streaming End-to-End Speech Recognition with RNN-Transducer

Jan 02, 2018
Kanishka Rao, Haşim Sak, Rohit Prabhavalkar

We investigate training end-to-end speech recognition models with the recurrent neural network transducer (RNN-T): a streaming, all-neural, sequence-to-sequence architecture which jointly learns acoustic and language model components from transcribed acoustic data. We explore various model architectures and demonstrate how the model can be improved further if additional text or pronunciation data are available. The model consists of an `encoder', which is initialized from a connectionist temporal classification-based (CTC) acoustic model, and a `decoder' which is partially initialized from a recurrent neural network language model trained on text data alone. The entire neural network is trained with the RNN-T loss and directly outputs the recognized transcript as a sequence of graphemes, thus performing end-to-end speech recognition. We find that performance can be improved further through the use of sub-word units (`wordpieces') which capture longer context and significantly reduce substitution errors. The best RNN-T system, a twelve-layer LSTM encoder with a two-layer LSTM decoder trained with 30,000 wordpieces as output targets achieves a word error rate of 8.5\% on voice-search and 5.2\% on voice-dictation tasks and is comparable to a state-of-the-art baseline at 8.3\% on voice-search and 5.4\% voice-dictation.

* In Proceedings of IEEE ASRU 2017 

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On the efficient representation and execution of deep acoustic models

Dec 17, 2016
Raziel Alvarez, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Anton Bakhtin

In this paper we present a simple and computationally efficient quantization scheme that enables us to reduce the resolution of the parameters of a neural network from 32-bit floating point values to 8-bit integer values. The proposed quantization scheme leads to significant memory savings and enables the use of optimized hardware instructions for integer arithmetic, thus significantly reducing the cost of inference. Finally, we propose a "quantization aware" training process that applies the proposed scheme during network training and find that it allows us to recover most of the loss in accuracy introduced by quantization. We validate the proposed techniques by applying them to a long short-term memory-based acoustic model on an open-ended large vocabulary speech recognition task.

* Accepted conference paper: "The Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association (Interspeech), 2016" 

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On the Compression of Recurrent Neural Networks with an Application to LVCSR acoustic modeling for Embedded Speech Recognition

May 02, 2016
Rohit Prabhavalkar, Ouais Alsharif, Antoine Bruguier, Ian McGraw

We study the problem of compressing recurrent neural networks (RNNs). In particular, we focus on the compression of RNN acoustic models, which are motivated by the goal of building compact and accurate speech recognition systems which can be run efficiently on mobile devices. In this work, we present a technique for general recurrent model compression that jointly compresses both recurrent and non-recurrent inter-layer weight matrices. We find that the proposed technique allows us to reduce the size of our Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) acoustic model to a third of its original size with negligible loss in accuracy.

* Accepted in ICASSP 2016 

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Phoneme-Based Contextualization for Cross-Lingual Speech Recognition in End-to-End Models

Jul 22, 2019
Ke Hu, Antoine Bruguier, Tara N. Sainath, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Golan Pundak

Contextual automatic speech recognition, i.e., biasing recognition towards a given context (e.g. user's playlists, or contacts), is challenging in end-to-end (E2E) models. Such models maintain a limited number of candidates during beam-search decoding, and have been found to recognize rare named entities poorly. The problem is exacerbated when biasing towards proper nouns in foreign languages, e.g., geographic location names, which are virtually unseen in training and are thus out-of-vocabulary (OOV). While grapheme or wordpiece E2E models might have a difficult time spelling OOV words, phonemes are more acoustically salient and past work has shown that E2E phoneme models can better predict such words. In this work, we propose an E2E model containing both English wordpieces and phonemes in the modeling space, and perform contextual biasing of foreign words at the phoneme level by mapping pronunciations of foreign words into similar English phonemes. In experimental evaluations, we find that the proposed approach performs 16% better than a grapheme-only biasing model, and 8% better than a wordpiece-only biasing model on a foreign place name recognition task, with only slight degradation on regular English tasks.


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Deep context: end-to-end contextual speech recognition

Aug 07, 2018
Golan Pundak, Tara N. Sainath, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Anjuli Kannan, Ding Zhao

In automatic speech recognition (ASR) what a user says depends on the particular context she is in. Typically, this context is represented as a set of word n-grams. In this work, we present a novel, all-neural, end-to-end (E2E) ASR sys- tem that utilizes such context. Our approach, which we re- fer to as Contextual Listen, Attend and Spell (CLAS) jointly- optimizes the ASR components along with embeddings of the context n-grams. During inference, the CLAS system can be presented with context phrases which might contain out-of- vocabulary (OOV) terms not seen during training. We com- pare our proposed system to a more traditional contextualiza- tion approach, which performs shallow-fusion between inde- pendently trained LAS and contextual n-gram models during beam search. Across a number of tasks, we find that the pro- posed CLAS system outperforms the baseline method by as much as 68% relative WER, indicating the advantage of joint optimization over individually trained components. Index Terms: speech recognition, sequence-to-sequence models, listen attend and spell, LAS, attention, embedded speech recognition.


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Streaming Small-Footprint Keyword Spotting using Sequence-to-Sequence Models

Oct 26, 2017
Yanzhang He, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Kanishka Rao, Wei Li, Anton Bakhtin, Ian McGraw

We develop streaming keyword spotting systems using a recurrent neural network transducer (RNN-T) model: an all-neural, end-to-end trained, sequence-to-sequence model which jointly learns acoustic and language model components. Our models are trained to predict either phonemes or graphemes as subword units, thus allowing us to detect arbitrary keyword phrases, without any out-of-vocabulary words. In order to adapt the models to the requirements of keyword spotting, we propose a novel technique which biases the RNN-T system towards a specific keyword of interest. Our systems are compared against a strong sequence-trained, connectionist temporal classification (CTC) based "keyword-filler" baseline, which is augmented with a separate phoneme language model. Overall, our RNN-T system with the proposed biasing technique significantly improves performance over the baseline system.

* To appear in Proceedings of IEEE ASRU 2017 

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Model Unit Exploration for Sequence-to-Sequence Speech Recognition

Feb 05, 2019
Kazuki Irie, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Anjuli Kannan, Antoine Bruguier, David Rybach, Patrick Nguyen

We evaluate attention-based encoder-decoder models along two dimensions: choice of target unit (phoneme, grapheme, and word-piece), and the amount of available training data. We conduct experiments on the LibriSpeech 100hr, 460hr, and 960hr tasks; across all tasks, we find that grapheme or word-piece models consistently outperform phoneme-based models, even though they are evaluated without a lexicon or an external language model. On the 960hr task the word-piece model achieves a word error rate (WER) of 4.7% on the test-clean set and 13.4% on the test-other set, which improves to 3.6% (clean) and 10.3% (other) when decoded with an LSTM LM: the lowest reported numbers using sequence-to-sequence models. We also conduct a detailed analysis of the various models, and investigate their complementarity: we find that we can improve WERs by up to 9% relative by rescoring N-best lists generated from the word-piece model with either the phoneme or the grapheme model. Rescoring an N-best list generated by the phonemic system, however, provides limited improvements. Further analysis shows that the word-piece-based models produce more diverse N-best hypotheses, resulting in lower oracle WERs, than the phonemic system.

* 5 pages, 1 figure 

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An analysis of incorporating an external language model into a sequence-to-sequence model

Dec 06, 2017
Anjuli Kannan, Yonghui Wu, Patrick Nguyen, Tara N. Sainath, Zhifeng Chen, Rohit Prabhavalkar

Attention-based sequence-to-sequence models for automatic speech recognition jointly train an acoustic model, language model, and alignment mechanism. Thus, the language model component is only trained on transcribed audio-text pairs. This leads to the use of shallow fusion with an external language model at inference time. Shallow fusion refers to log-linear interpolation with a separately trained language model at each step of the beam search. In this work, we investigate the behavior of shallow fusion across a range of conditions: different types of language models, different decoding units, and different tasks. On Google Voice Search, we demonstrate that the use of shallow fusion with a neural LM with wordpieces yields a 9.1% relative word error rate reduction (WERR) over our competitive attention-based sequence-to-sequence model, obviating the need for second-pass rescoring.


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Minimum Word Error Rate Training for Attention-based Sequence-to-Sequence Models

Dec 05, 2017
Rohit Prabhavalkar, Tara N. Sainath, Yonghui Wu, Patrick Nguyen, Zhifeng Chen, Chung-Cheng Chiu, Anjuli Kannan

Sequence-to-sequence models, such as attention-based models in automatic speech recognition (ASR), are typically trained to optimize the cross-entropy criterion which corresponds to improving the log-likelihood of the data. However, system performance is usually measured in terms of word error rate (WER), not log-likelihood. Traditional ASR systems benefit from discriminative sequence training which optimizes criteria such as the state-level minimum Bayes risk (sMBR) which are more closely related to WER. In the present work, we explore techniques to train attention-based models to directly minimize expected word error rate. We consider two loss functions which approximate the expected number of word errors: either by sampling from the model, or by using N-best lists of decoded hypotheses, which we find to be more effective than the sampling-based method. In experimental evaluations, we find that the proposed training procedure improves performance by up to 8.2% relative to the baseline system. This allows us to train grapheme-based, uni-directional attention-based models which match the performance of a traditional, state-of-the-art, discriminative sequence-trained system on a mobile voice-search task.


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Improving the Performance of Online Neural Transducer Models

Dec 05, 2017
Tara N. Sainath, Chung-Cheng Chiu, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Anjuli Kannan, Yonghui Wu, Patrick Nguyen, Zhifeng Chen

Having a sequence-to-sequence model which can operate in an online fashion is important for streaming applications such as Voice Search. Neural transducer is a streaming sequence-to-sequence model, but has shown a significant degradation in performance compared to non-streaming models such as Listen, Attend and Spell (LAS). In this paper, we present various improvements to NT. Specifically, we look at increasing the window over which NT computes attention, mainly by looking backwards in time so the model still remains online. In addition, we explore initializing a NT model from a LAS-trained model so that it is guided with a better alignment. Finally, we explore including stronger language models such as using wordpiece models, and applying an external LM during the beam search. On a Voice Search task, we find with these improvements we can get NT to match the performance of LAS.


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From Audio to Semantics: Approaches to end-to-end spoken language understanding

Sep 24, 2018
Parisa Haghani, Arun Narayanan, Michiel Bacchiani, Galen Chuang, Neeraj Gaur, Pedro Moreno, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Zhongdi Qu, Austin Waters

Conventional spoken language understanding systems consist of two main components: an automatic speech recognition module that converts audio to a transcript, and a natural language understanding module that transforms the resulting text (or top N hypotheses) into a set of domains, intents, and arguments. These modules are typically optimized independently. In this paper, we formulate audio to semantic understanding as a sequence-to-sequence problem [1]. We propose and compare various encoder-decoder based approaches that optimize both modules jointly, in an end-to-end manner. Evaluations on a real-world task show that 1) having an intermediate text representation is crucial for the quality of the predicted semantics, especially the intent arguments and 2) jointly optimizing the full system improves overall accuracy of prediction. Compared to independently trained models, our best jointly trained model achieves similar domain and intent prediction F1 scores, but improves argument word error rate by 18% relative.


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Personalized Speech recognition on mobile devices

Mar 11, 2016
Ian McGraw, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Raziel Alvarez, Montse Gonzalez Arenas, Kanishka Rao, David Rybach, Ouais Alsharif, Hasim Sak, Alexander Gruenstein, Francoise Beaufays, Carolina Parada

We describe a large vocabulary speech recognition system that is accurate, has low latency, and yet has a small enough memory and computational footprint to run faster than real-time on a Nexus 5 Android smartphone. We employ a quantized Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) acoustic model trained with connectionist temporal classification (CTC) to directly predict phoneme targets, and further reduce its memory footprint using an SVD-based compression scheme. Additionally, we minimize our memory footprint by using a single language model for both dictation and voice command domains, constructed using Bayesian interpolation. Finally, in order to properly handle device-specific information, such as proper names and other context-dependent information, we inject vocabulary items into the decoder graph and bias the language model on-the-fly. Our system achieves 13.5% word error rate on an open-ended dictation task, running with a median speed that is seven times faster than real-time.


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Two-Pass End-to-End Speech Recognition

Aug 29, 2019
Tara N. Sainath, Ruoming Pang, David Rybach, Yanzhang He, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Wei Li, Mirkó Visontai, Qiao Liang, Trevor Strohman, Yonghui Wu, Ian McGraw, Chung-Cheng Chiu

The requirements for many applications of state-of-the-art speech recognition systems include not only low word error rate (WER) but also low latency. Specifically, for many use-cases, the system must be able to decode utterances in a streaming fashion and faster than real-time. Recently, a streaming recurrent neural network transducer (RNN-T) end-to-end (E2E) model has shown to be a good candidate for on-device speech recognition, with improved WER and latency metrics compared to conventional on-device models [1]. However, this model still lags behind a large state-of-the-art conventional model in quality [2]. On the other hand, a non-streaming E2E Listen, Attend and Spell (LAS) model has shown comparable quality to large conventional models [3]. This work aims to bring the quality of an E2E streaming model closer to that of a conventional system by incorporating a LAS network as a second-pass component, while still abiding by latency constraints. Our proposed two-pass model achieves a 17%-22% relative reduction in WER compared to RNN-T alone and increases latency by a small fraction over RNN-T.


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No Need for a Lexicon? Evaluating the Value of the Pronunciation Lexica in End-to-End Models

Dec 05, 2017
Tara N. Sainath, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Shankar Kumar, Seungji Lee, Anjuli Kannan, David Rybach, Vlad Schogol, Patrick Nguyen, Bo Li, Yonghui Wu, Zhifeng Chen, Chung-Cheng Chiu

For decades, context-dependent phonemes have been the dominant sub-word unit for conventional acoustic modeling systems. This status quo has begun to be challenged recently by end-to-end models which seek to combine acoustic, pronunciation, and language model components into a single neural network. Such systems, which typically predict graphemes or words, simplify the recognition process since they remove the need for a separate expert-curated pronunciation lexicon to map from phoneme-based units to words. However, there has been little previous work comparing phoneme-based versus grapheme-based sub-word units in the end-to-end modeling framework, to determine whether the gains from such approaches are primarily due to the new probabilistic model, or from the joint learning of the various components with grapheme-based units. In this work, we conduct detailed experiments which are aimed at quantifying the value of phoneme-based pronunciation lexica in the context of end-to-end models. We examine phoneme-based end-to-end models, which are contrasted against grapheme-based ones on a large vocabulary English Voice-search task, where we find that graphemes do indeed outperform phonemes. We also compare grapheme and phoneme-based approaches on a multi-dialect English task, which once again confirm the superiority of graphemes, greatly simplifying the system for recognizing multiple dialects.


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State-of-the-art Speech Recognition With Sequence-to-Sequence Models

Feb 23, 2018
Chung-Cheng Chiu, Tara N. Sainath, Yonghui Wu, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Patrick Nguyen, Zhifeng Chen, Anjuli Kannan, Ron J. Weiss, Kanishka Rao, Ekaterina Gonina, Navdeep Jaitly, Bo Li, Jan Chorowski, Michiel Bacchiani

Attention-based encoder-decoder architectures such as Listen, Attend, and Spell (LAS), subsume the acoustic, pronunciation and language model components of a traditional automatic speech recognition (ASR) system into a single neural network. In previous work, we have shown that such architectures are comparable to state-of-theart ASR systems on dictation tasks, but it was not clear if such architectures would be practical for more challenging tasks such as voice search. In this work, we explore a variety of structural and optimization improvements to our LAS model which significantly improve performance. On the structural side, we show that word piece models can be used instead of graphemes. We also introduce a multi-head attention architecture, which offers improvements over the commonly-used single-head attention. On the optimization side, we explore synchronous training, scheduled sampling, label smoothing, and minimum word error rate optimization, which are all shown to improve accuracy. We present results with a unidirectional LSTM encoder for streaming recognition. On a 12, 500 hour voice search task, we find that the proposed changes improve the WER from 9.2% to 5.6%, while the best conventional system achieves 6.7%; on a dictation task our model achieves a WER of 4.1% compared to 5% for the conventional system.

* ICASSP camera-ready version 

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Streaming End-to-end Speech Recognition For Mobile Devices

Nov 15, 2018
Yanzhang He, Tara N. Sainath, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Ian McGraw, Raziel Alvarez, Ding Zhao, David Rybach, Anjuli Kannan, Yonghui Wu, Ruoming Pang, Qiao Liang, Deepti Bhatia, Yuan Shangguan, Bo Li, Golan Pundak, Khe Chai Sim, Tom Bagby, Shuo-yiin Chang, Kanishka Rao, Alexander Gruenstein

End-to-end (E2E) models, which directly predict output character sequences given input speech, are good candidates for on-device speech recognition. E2E models, however, present numerous challenges: In order to be truly useful, such models must decode speech utterances in a streaming fashion, in real time; they must be robust to the long tail of use cases; they must be able to leverage user-specific context (e.g., contact lists); and above all, they must be extremely accurate. In this work, we describe our efforts at building an E2E speech recognizer using a recurrent neural network transducer. In experimental evaluations, we find that the proposed approach can outperform a conventional CTC-based model in terms of both latency and accuracy in a number of evaluation categories.


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Lingvo: a Modular and Scalable Framework for Sequence-to-Sequence Modeling

Feb 21, 2019
Jonathan Shen, Patrick Nguyen, Yonghui Wu, Zhifeng Chen, Mia X. Chen, Ye Jia, Anjuli Kannan, Tara Sainath, Yuan Cao, Chung-Cheng Chiu, Yanzhang He, Jan Chorowski, Smit Hinsu, Stella Laurenzo, James Qin, Orhan Firat, Wolfgang Macherey, Suyog Gupta, Ankur Bapna, Shuyuan Zhang, Ruoming Pang, Ron J. Weiss, Rohit Prabhavalkar, Qiao Liang, Benoit Jacob, Bowen Liang, HyoukJoong Lee, Ciprian Chelba, Sébastien Jean, Bo Li, Melvin Johnson, Rohan Anil, Rajat Tibrewal, Xiaobing Liu, Akiko Eriguchi, Navdeep Jaitly, Naveen Ari, Colin Cherry, Parisa Haghani, Otavio Good, Youlong Cheng, Raziel Alvarez, Isaac Caswell, Wei-Ning Hsu, Zongheng Yang, Kuan-Chieh Wang, Ekaterina Gonina, Katrin Tomanek, Ben Vanik, Zelin Wu, Llion Jones, Mike Schuster, Yanping Huang, Dehao Chen, Kazuki Irie, George Foster, John Richardson, Klaus Macherey, Antoine Bruguier, Heiga Zen, Colin Raffel, Shankar Kumar, Kanishka Rao, David Rybach, Matthew Murray, Vijayaditya Peddinti, Maxim Krikun, Michiel A. U. Bacchiani, Thomas B. Jablin, Rob Suderman, Ian Williams, Benjamin Lee, Deepti Bhatia, Justin Carlson, Semih Yavuz, Yu Zhang, Ian McGraw, Max Galkin, Qi Ge, Golan Pundak, Chad Whipkey, Todd Wang, Uri Alon, Dmitry Lepikhin, Ye Tian, Sara Sabour, William Chan, Shubham Toshniwal, Baohua Liao, Michael Nirschl, Pat Rondon

Lingvo is a Tensorflow framework offering a complete solution for collaborative deep learning research, with a particular focus towards sequence-to-sequence models. Lingvo models are composed of modular building blocks that are flexible and easily extensible, and experiment configurations are centralized and highly customizable. Distributed training and quantized inference are supported directly within the framework, and it contains existing implementations of a large number of utilities, helper functions, and the newest research ideas. Lingvo has been used in collaboration by dozens of researchers in more than 20 papers over the last two years. This document outlines the underlying design of Lingvo and serves as an introduction to the various pieces of the framework, while also offering examples of advanced features that showcase the capabilities of the framework.


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