Models, code, and papers for "Ross Girshick":

Fast R-CNN

Sep 27, 2015
Ross Girshick

This paper proposes a Fast Region-based Convolutional Network method (Fast R-CNN) for object detection. Fast R-CNN builds on previous work to efficiently classify object proposals using deep convolutional networks. Compared to previous work, Fast R-CNN employs several innovations to improve training and testing speed while also increasing detection accuracy. Fast R-CNN trains the very deep VGG16 network 9x faster than R-CNN, is 213x faster at test-time, and achieves a higher mAP on PASCAL VOC 2012. Compared to SPPnet, Fast R-CNN trains VGG16 3x faster, tests 10x faster, and is more accurate. Fast R-CNN is implemented in Python and C++ (using Caffe) and is available under the open-source MIT License at https://github.com/rbgirshick/fast-rcnn.

* To appear in ICCV 2015 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Low-shot Visual Recognition by Shrinking and Hallucinating Features

Nov 04, 2017
Bharath Hariharan, Ross Girshick

Low-shot visual learning---the ability to recognize novel object categories from very few examples---is a hallmark of human visual intelligence. Existing machine learning approaches fail to generalize in the same way. To make progress on this foundational problem, we present a low-shot learning benchmark on complex images that mimics challenges faced by recognition systems in the wild. We then propose a) representation regularization techniques, and b) techniques to hallucinate additional training examples for data-starved classes. Together, our methods improve the effectiveness of convolutional networks in low-shot learning, improving the one-shot accuracy on novel classes by 2.3x on the challenging ImageNet dataset.

* ICCV 2017 spotlight 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Rethinking ImageNet Pre-training

Nov 21, 2018
Kaiming He, Ross Girshick, Piotr Dollár

We report competitive results on object detection and instance segmentation on the COCO dataset using standard models trained from random initialization. The results are no worse than their ImageNet pre-training counterparts even when using the hyper-parameters of the baseline system (Mask R-CNN) that were optimized for fine-tuning pre-trained models, with the sole exception of increasing the number of training iterations so the randomly initialized models may converge. Training from random initialization is surprisingly robust; our results hold even when: (i) using only 10% of the training data, (ii) for deeper and wider models, and (iii) for multiple tasks and metrics. Experiments show that ImageNet pre-training speeds up convergence early in training, but does not necessarily provide regularization or improve final target task accuracy. To push the envelope we demonstrate 50.9 AP on COCO object detection without using any external data---a result on par with the top COCO 2017 competition results that used ImageNet pre-training. These observations challenge the conventional wisdom of ImageNet pre-training for dependent tasks and we expect these discoveries will encourage people to rethink the current de facto paradigm of `pre-training and fine-tuning' in computer vision.

* Technical report 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Training Region-based Object Detectors with Online Hard Example Mining

Apr 12, 2016
Abhinav Shrivastava, Abhinav Gupta, Ross Girshick

The field of object detection has made significant advances riding on the wave of region-based ConvNets, but their training procedure still includes many heuristics and hyperparameters that are costly to tune. We present a simple yet surprisingly effective online hard example mining (OHEM) algorithm for training region-based ConvNet detectors. Our motivation is the same as it has always been -- detection datasets contain an overwhelming number of easy examples and a small number of hard examples. Automatic selection of these hard examples can make training more effective and efficient. OHEM is a simple and intuitive algorithm that eliminates several heuristics and hyperparameters in common use. But more importantly, it yields consistent and significant boosts in detection performance on benchmarks like PASCAL VOC 2007 and 2012. Its effectiveness increases as datasets become larger and more difficult, as demonstrated by the results on the MS COCO dataset. Moreover, combined with complementary advances in the field, OHEM leads to state-of-the-art results of 78.9% and 76.3% mAP on PASCAL VOC 2007 and 2012 respectively.

* To appear in Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), 2016. (oral) 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
LVIS: A Dataset for Large Vocabulary Instance Segmentation

Sep 15, 2019
Agrim Gupta, Piotr Dollár, Ross Girshick

Progress on object detection is enabled by datasets that focus the research community's attention on open challenges. This process led us from simple images to complex scenes and from bounding boxes to segmentation masks. In this work, we introduce LVIS (pronounced `el-vis'): a new dataset for Large Vocabulary Instance Segmentation. We plan to collect ~2 million high-quality instance segmentation masks for over 1000 entry-level object categories in 164k images. Due to the Zipfian distribution of categories in natural images, LVIS naturally has a long tail of categories with few training samples. Given that state-of-the-art deep learning methods for object detection perform poorly in the low-sample regime, we believe that our dataset poses an important and exciting new scientific challenge. LVIS is available at http://www.lvisdataset.org.

* Extension of the CVPR'19 paper describing release v0.5, the LVIS Challenge, and baseline results 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Unsupervised Deep Embedding for Clustering Analysis

May 24, 2016
Junyuan Xie, Ross Girshick, Ali Farhadi

Clustering is central to many data-driven application domains and has been studied extensively in terms of distance functions and grouping algorithms. Relatively little work has focused on learning representations for clustering. In this paper, we propose Deep Embedded Clustering (DEC), a method that simultaneously learns feature representations and cluster assignments using deep neural networks. DEC learns a mapping from the data space to a lower-dimensional feature space in which it iteratively optimizes a clustering objective. Our experimental evaluations on image and text corpora show significant improvement over state-of-the-art methods.

* icml2016 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Deep3D: Fully Automatic 2D-to-3D Video Conversion with Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

Apr 13, 2016
Junyuan Xie, Ross Girshick, Ali Farhadi

As 3D movie viewing becomes mainstream and Virtual Reality (VR) market emerges, the demand for 3D contents is growing rapidly. Producing 3D videos, however, remains challenging. In this paper we propose to use deep neural networks for automatically converting 2D videos and images to stereoscopic 3D format. In contrast to previous automatic 2D-to-3D conversion algorithms, which have separate stages and need ground truth depth map as supervision, our approach is trained end-to-end directly on stereo pairs extracted from 3D movies. This novel training scheme makes it possible to exploit orders of magnitude more data and significantly increases performance. Indeed, Deep3D outperforms baselines in both quantitative and human subject evaluations.


  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Contextual Action Recognition with R*CNN

Mar 25, 2016
Georgia Gkioxari, Ross Girshick, Jitendra Malik

There are multiple cues in an image which reveal what action a person is performing. For example, a jogger has a pose that is characteristic for jogging, but the scene (e.g. road, trail) and the presence of other joggers can be an additional source of information. In this work, we exploit the simple observation that actions are accompanied by contextual cues to build a strong action recognition system. We adapt RCNN to use more than one region for classification while still maintaining the ability to localize the action. We call our system R*CNN. The action-specific models and the feature maps are trained jointly, allowing for action specific representations to emerge. R*CNN achieves 90.2% mean AP on the PASAL VOC Action dataset, outperforming all other approaches in the field by a significant margin. Last, we show that R*CNN is not limited to action recognition. In particular, R*CNN can also be used to tackle fine-grained tasks such as attribute classification. We validate this claim by reporting state-of-the-art performance on the Berkeley Attributes of People dataset.


  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Actions and Attributes from Wholes and Parts

May 05, 2015
Georgia Gkioxari, Ross Girshick, Jitendra Malik

We investigate the importance of parts for the tasks of action and attribute classification. We develop a part-based approach by leveraging convolutional network features inspired by recent advances in computer vision. Our part detectors are a deep version of poselets and capture parts of the human body under a distinct set of poses. For the tasks of action and attribute classification, we train holistic convolutional neural networks and show that adding parts leads to top-performing results for both tasks. In addition, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach when we replace an oracle person detector, as is the default in the current evaluation protocol for both tasks, with a state-of-the-art person detection system.


  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Analyzing the Performance of Multilayer Neural Networks for Object Recognition

Sep 22, 2014
Pulkit Agrawal, Ross Girshick, Jitendra Malik

In the last two years, convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have achieved an impressive suite of results on standard recognition datasets and tasks. CNN-based features seem poised to quickly replace engineered representations, such as SIFT and HOG. However, compared to SIFT and HOG, we understand much less about the nature of the features learned by large CNNs. In this paper, we experimentally probe several aspects of CNN feature learning in an attempt to help practitioners gain useful, evidence-backed intuitions about how to apply CNNs to computer vision problems.

* Published in European Conference on Computer Vision 2014 (ECCV-2014) 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Exploring Randomly Wired Neural Networks for Image Recognition

Apr 08, 2019
Saining Xie, Alexander Kirillov, Ross Girshick, Kaiming He

Neural networks for image recognition have evolved through extensive manual design from simple chain-like models to structures with multiple wiring paths. The success of ResNets and DenseNets is due in large part to their innovative wiring plans. Now, neural architecture search (NAS) studies are exploring the joint optimization of wiring and operation types, however, the space of possible wirings is constrained and still driven by manual design despite being searched. In this paper, we explore a more diverse set of connectivity patterns through the lens of randomly wired neural networks. To do this, we first define the concept of a stochastic network generator that encapsulates the entire network generation process. Encapsulation provides a unified view of NAS and randomly wired networks. Then, we use three classical random graph models to generate randomly wired graphs for networks. The results are surprising: several variants of these random generators yield network instances that have competitive accuracy on the ImageNet benchmark. These results suggest that new efforts focusing on designing better network generators may lead to new breakthroughs by exploring less constrained search spaces with more room for novel design.

* Technical report 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
TensorMask: A Foundation for Dense Object Segmentation

Mar 28, 2019
Xinlei Chen, Ross Girshick, Kaiming He, Piotr Dollár

Sliding-window object detectors that generate bounding-box object predictions over a dense, regular grid have advanced rapidly and proven popular. In contrast, modern instance segmentation approaches are dominated by methods that first detect object bounding boxes, and then crop and segment these regions, as popularized by Mask R-CNN. In this work, we investigate the paradigm of dense sliding-window instance segmentation, which is surprisingly under-explored. Our core observation is that this task is fundamentally different than other dense prediction tasks such as semantic segmentation or bounding-box object detection, as the output at every spatial location is itself a geometric structure with its own spatial dimensions. To formalize this, we treat dense instance segmentation as a prediction task over 4D tensors and present a general framework called TensorMask that explicitly captures this geometry and enables novel operators on 4D tensors. We demonstrate that the tensor view leads to large gains over baselines that ignore this structure, and leads to results comparable to Mask R-CNN. These promising results suggest that TensorMask can serve as a foundation for novel advances in dense mask prediction and a more complete understanding of the task. Code will be made available.

* 12 pages, technical report 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Panoptic Feature Pyramid Networks

Jan 08, 2019
Alexander Kirillov, Ross Girshick, Kaiming He, Piotr Dollár

The recently introduced panoptic segmentation task has renewed our community's interest in unifying the tasks of instance segmentation (for thing classes) and semantic segmentation (for stuff classes). However, current state-of-the-art methods for this joint task use separate and dissimilar networks for instance and semantic segmentation, without performing any shared computation. In this work, we aim to unify these methods at the architectural level, designing a single network for both tasks. Our approach is to endow Mask R-CNN, a popular instance segmentation method, with a semantic segmentation branch using a shared Feature Pyramid Network (FPN) backbone. Surprisingly, this simple baseline not only remains effective for instance segmentation, but also yields a lightweight, top-performing method for semantic segmentation. In this work, we perform a detailed study of this minimally extended version of Mask R-CNN with FPN, which we refer to as Panoptic FPN, and show it is a robust and accurate baseline for both tasks. Given its effectiveness and conceptual simplicity, we hope our method can serve as a strong baseline and aid future research in panoptic segmentation.

* tech report 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Non-local Neural Networks

Apr 13, 2018
Xiaolong Wang, Ross Girshick, Abhinav Gupta, Kaiming He

Both convolutional and recurrent operations are building blocks that process one local neighborhood at a time. In this paper, we present non-local operations as a generic family of building blocks for capturing long-range dependencies. Inspired by the classical non-local means method in computer vision, our non-local operation computes the response at a position as a weighted sum of the features at all positions. This building block can be plugged into many computer vision architectures. On the task of video classification, even without any bells and whistles, our non-local models can compete or outperform current competition winners on both Kinetics and Charades datasets. In static image recognition, our non-local models improve object detection/segmentation and pose estimation on the COCO suite of tasks. Code is available at https://github.com/facebookresearch/video-nonlocal-net .

* CVPR 2018, code is available at: https://github.com/facebookresearch/video-nonlocal-net 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Detecting and Recognizing Human-Object Interactions

Mar 27, 2018
Georgia Gkioxari, Ross Girshick, Piotr Dollár, Kaiming He

To understand the visual world, a machine must not only recognize individual object instances but also how they interact. Humans are often at the center of such interactions and detecting human-object interactions is an important practical and scientific problem. In this paper, we address the task of detecting <human, verb, object> triplets in challenging everyday photos. We propose a novel model that is driven by a human-centric approach. Our hypothesis is that the appearance of a person -- their pose, clothing, action -- is a powerful cue for localizing the objects they are interacting with. To exploit this cue, our model learns to predict an action-specific density over target object locations based on the appearance of a detected person. Our model also jointly learns to detect people and objects, and by fusing these predictions it efficiently infers interaction triplets in a clean, jointly trained end-to-end system we call InteractNet. We validate our approach on the recently introduced Verbs in COCO (V-COCO) and HICO-DET datasets, where we show quantitatively compelling results.


  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Mask R-CNN

Jan 24, 2018
Kaiming He, Georgia Gkioxari, Piotr Dollár, Ross Girshick

We present a conceptually simple, flexible, and general framework for object instance segmentation. Our approach efficiently detects objects in an image while simultaneously generating a high-quality segmentation mask for each instance. The method, called Mask R-CNN, extends Faster R-CNN by adding a branch for predicting an object mask in parallel with the existing branch for bounding box recognition. Mask R-CNN is simple to train and adds only a small overhead to Faster R-CNN, running at 5 fps. Moreover, Mask R-CNN is easy to generalize to other tasks, e.g., allowing us to estimate human poses in the same framework. We show top results in all three tracks of the COCO suite of challenges, including instance segmentation, bounding-box object detection, and person keypoint detection. Without bells and whistles, Mask R-CNN outperforms all existing, single-model entries on every task, including the COCO 2016 challenge winners. We hope our simple and effective approach will serve as a solid baseline and help ease future research in instance-level recognition. Code has been made available at: https://github.com/facebookresearch/Detectron

* open source; appendix on more results 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Faster R-CNN: Towards Real-Time Object Detection with Region Proposal Networks

Jan 06, 2016
Shaoqing Ren, Kaiming He, Ross Girshick, Jian Sun

State-of-the-art object detection networks depend on region proposal algorithms to hypothesize object locations. Advances like SPPnet and Fast R-CNN have reduced the running time of these detection networks, exposing region proposal computation as a bottleneck. In this work, we introduce a Region Proposal Network (RPN) that shares full-image convolutional features with the detection network, thus enabling nearly cost-free region proposals. An RPN is a fully convolutional network that simultaneously predicts object bounds and objectness scores at each position. The RPN is trained end-to-end to generate high-quality region proposals, which are used by Fast R-CNN for detection. We further merge RPN and Fast R-CNN into a single network by sharing their convolutional features---using the recently popular terminology of neural networks with 'attention' mechanisms, the RPN component tells the unified network where to look. For the very deep VGG-16 model, our detection system has a frame rate of 5fps (including all steps) on a GPU, while achieving state-of-the-art object detection accuracy on PASCAL VOC 2007, 2012, and MS COCO datasets with only 300 proposals per image. In ILSVRC and COCO 2015 competitions, Faster R-CNN and RPN are the foundations of the 1st-place winning entries in several tracks. Code has been made publicly available.

* Extended tech report 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper
You Only Look Once: Unified, Real-Time Object Detection

May 09, 2016
Joseph Redmon, Santosh Divvala, Ross Girshick, Ali Farhadi

We present YOLO, a new approach to object detection. Prior work on object detection repurposes classifiers to perform detection. Instead, we frame object detection as a regression problem to spatially separated bounding boxes and associated class probabilities. A single neural network predicts bounding boxes and class probabilities directly from full images in one evaluation. Since the whole detection pipeline is a single network, it can be optimized end-to-end directly on detection performance. Our unified architecture is extremely fast. Our base YOLO model processes images in real-time at 45 frames per second. A smaller version of the network, Fast YOLO, processes an astounding 155 frames per second while still achieving double the mAP of other real-time detectors. Compared to state-of-the-art detection systems, YOLO makes more localization errors but is far less likely to predict false detections where nothing exists. Finally, YOLO learns very general representations of objects. It outperforms all other detection methods, including DPM and R-CNN, by a wide margin when generalizing from natural images to artwork on both the Picasso Dataset and the People-Art Dataset.


  Click for Model/Code and Paper
Hypercolumns for Object Segmentation and Fine-grained Localization

Apr 25, 2015
Bharath Hariharan, Pablo Arbeláez, Ross Girshick, Jitendra Malik

Recognition algorithms based on convolutional networks (CNNs) typically use the output of the last layer as feature representation. However, the information in this layer may be too coarse to allow precise localization. On the contrary, earlier layers may be precise in localization but will not capture semantics. To get the best of both worlds, we define the hypercolumn at a pixel as the vector of activations of all CNN units above that pixel. Using hypercolumns as pixel descriptors, we show results on three fine-grained localization tasks: simultaneous detection and segmentation[22], where we improve state-of-the-art from 49.7[22] mean AP^r to 60.0, keypoint localization, where we get a 3.3 point boost over[20] and part labeling, where we show a 6.6 point gain over a strong baseline.

* CVPR Camera ready 

  Click for Model/Code and Paper