Research papers and code for "Sergey Tulyakov":
We present a method for fine-grained face manipulation. Given a face image with an arbitrary expression, our method can synthesize another arbitrary expression by the same person. This is achieved by first fitting a 3D face model and then disentangling the face into a texture and a shape. We then learn different networks in these two spaces. In the texture space, we use a conditional generative network to change the appearance, and carefully design input formats and loss functions to achieve the best results. In the shape space, we use a fully connected network to predict the accurate shapes and use the available depth data for supervision. Both networks are conditioned on expression coefficients rather than discrete labels, allowing us to generate an unlimited amount of expressions. We show the superiority of this disentangling approach through both quantitative and qualitative studies. In a user study, our method is preferred in 85% of cases when compared to the most recent work. When compared to the ground truth, annotators cannot reliably distinguish between our synthesized images and real images, preferring our method in 53% of the cases.

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Deep neural network models trained on large labeled datasets are the state-of-the-art in a large variety of computer vision tasks. In many applications, however, labeled data is expensive to obtain or requires a time consuming manual annotation process. In contrast, unlabeled data is often abundant and available in large quantities. We present a principled framework to capitalize on unlabeled data by training deep generative models on both labeled and unlabeled data. We show that such a combination is beneficial because the unlabeled data acts as a data-driven form of regularization, allowing generative models trained on few labeled samples to reach the performance of fully-supervised generative models trained on much larger datasets. We call our method Hybrid VAE (H-VAE) as it contains both the generative and the discriminative parts. We validate H-VAE on three large-scale datasets of different modalities: two face datasets: (MultiPIE, CelebA) and a hand pose dataset (NYU Hand Pose). Our qualitative visualizations further support improvements achieved by using partial observations.

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Visual signals in a video can be divided into content and motion. While content specifies which objects are in the video, motion describes their dynamics. Based on this prior, we propose the Motion and Content decomposed Generative Adversarial Network (MoCoGAN) framework for video generation. The proposed framework generates a video by mapping a sequence of random vectors to a sequence of video frames. Each random vector consists of a content part and a motion part. While the content part is kept fixed, the motion part is realized as a stochastic process. To learn motion and content decomposition in an unsupervised manner, we introduce a novel adversarial learning scheme utilizing both image and video discriminators. Extensive experimental results on several challenging datasets with qualitative and quantitative comparison to the state-of-the-art approaches, verify effectiveness of the proposed framework. In addition, we show that MoCoGAN allows one to generate videos with same content but different motion as well as videos with different content and same motion.

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We introduce a novel domain adaptation formulation from synthetic dataset (source domain) to real dataset (target domain) for the category of tasks with per-pixel predictions. The annotations of these tasks are relatively hard to acquire in the real world, such as single-view depth estimation or surface normal estimation. Our key idea is to introduce anchor tasks, whose annotations are (1) less expensive to acquire than the main task, such as facial landmarks and semantic segmentations; and (2) shared in availability for both synthetic and real datasets so that it serves as "anchor" between tasks; and finally (3) aligned spatially with main task annotations on a per-pixel basis so that it also serves as spatial anchor between tasks' outputs. To further utilize spatial alignment between the anchor and main tasks, we introduce a novel freeze approach that freezes the final layers of our network after training on the source domain so that spatial and contextual relationship between tasks are maintained when adapting on the target domain. We evaluate our methods on two pairs of datasets, performing surface normal estimation in indoor scenes and faces, using semantic segmentation and facial landmarks as anchor tasks separately. We show the importance of using anchor tasks in both synthetic and real domains, and that the freeze approach outperforms competing approaches, reaching results in facial images on par with the state-of-the-art system that leverages detailed facial appearance model.

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We propose a novel approach to performing fine-grained 3D manipulation of image content via a convolutional neural network, which we call the Transformable Bottleneck Network (TBN). It applies given spatial transformations directly to a volumetric bottleneck within our encoder-bottleneck-decoder architecture. Multi-view supervision encourages the network to learn to spatially disentangle the feature space within the bottleneck. The resulting spatial structure can be manipulated with arbitrary spatial transformations. We demonstrate the efficacy of TBNs for novel view synthesis, achieving state-of-the-art results on a challenging benchmark. We demonstrate that the bottlenecks produced by networks trained for this task contain meaningful spatial structure that allows us to intuitively perform a variety of image manipulations in 3D, well beyond the rigid transformations seen during training. These manipulations include non-uniform scaling, non-rigid warping, and combining content from different images. Finally, we extract explicit 3D structure from the bottleneck, performing impressive 3D reconstruction from a single input image.

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This paper introduces a novel deep learning framework for image animation. Given an input image with a target object and a driving video sequence depicting a moving object, our framework generates a video in which the target object is animated according to the driving sequence. This is achieved through a deep architecture that decouples appearance and motion information. Our framework consists of three main modules: (i) a Keypoint Detector unsupervisely trained to extract object keypoints, (ii) a Dense Motion prediction network for generating dense heatmaps from sparse keypoints, in order to better encode motion information and (iii) a Motion Transfer Network, which uses the motion heatmaps and appearance information extracted from the input image to synthesize the output frames. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on several benchmark datasets, spanning a wide variety of object appearances, and show that our approach outperforms state-of-the-art image animation and video generation methods.

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Landmark localization in images and videos is a classic problem solved in various ways. Nowadays, with deep networks prevailing throughout machine learning, there are revamped interests in pushing facial landmark detection technologies to handle more challenging data. Most efforts use network objectives based on L1 or L2 norms, which have several disadvantages. First of all, the locations of landmarks are determined from generated heatmaps (i.e., confidence maps) from which predicted landmark locations (i.e., the means) get penalized without accounting for the spread: a high scatter corresponds to low confidence and vice-versa. For this, we introduce a LaplaceKL objective that penalizes for a low confidence. Another issue is a dependency on labeled data, which are expensive to obtain and susceptible to error. To address both issues we propose an adversarial training framework that leverages unlabeled data to improve model performance. Our method claims state-of-the-art on all of the 300W benchmarks and ranks second-to-best on the Annotated Facial Landmarks in the Wild (AFLW) dataset. Furthermore, our model is robust with a reduced size: 1/8 the number of channels (i.e., 0.0398MB) is comparable to state-of-that-art in real-time on CPU. Thus, we show that our method is of high practical value to real-life application.

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Tracking user reported bugs requires considerable engineering effort in going through many repetitive reports and assigning them to the correct teams. This paper proposes a neural architecture that can jointly (1) detect if two bug reports are duplicates, and (2) aggregate them into latent topics. Leveraging the assumption that learning the topic of a bug is a sub-task for detecting duplicates, we design a loss function that can jointly perform both tasks but needs supervision for only duplicate classification, achieving topic clustering in an unsupervised fashion. We use a two-step attention module that uses self-attention for topic clustering and conditional attention for duplicate detection. We study the characteristics of two types of real world datasets that have been marked for duplicate bugs by engineers and by non-technical annotators. The results demonstrate that our model not only can outperform state-of-the-art methods for duplicate classification on both cases, but can also learn meaningful latent clusters without additional supervision.

* Accepted for publication in NAACL 2019
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