We propose a data-driven approach for intrinsic image decomposition, which is the process of inferring the confounding factors of reflectance and shading in an image. We pose this as a two-stage learning problem. First, we train a model to predict relative reflectance ordering between image patches (`brighter', `darker', `same') from large-scale human annotations, producing a data-driven reflectance prior. Second, we show how to naturally integrate this learned prior into existing energy minimization frameworks for intrinsic image decomposition. We compare our method to the state-of-the-art approach of Bell et al. on both decomposition and image relighting tasks, demonstrating the benefits of the simple relative reflectance prior, especially for scenes under challenging lighting conditions.

* International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV) 2015
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This paper presents a simple method for "do as I do" motion transfer: given a source video of a person dancing we can transfer that performance to a novel (amateur) target after only a few minutes of the target subject performing standard moves. We pose this problem as a per-frame image-to-image translation with spatio-temporal smoothing. Using pose detections as an intermediate representation between source and target, we learn a mapping from pose images to a target subject's appearance. We adapt this setup for temporally coherent video generation including realistic face synthesis. Our video demo can be found at https://youtu.be/PCBTZh41Ris .

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We study the notion of consistency between a 3D shape and a 2D observation and propose a differentiable formulation which allows computing gradients of the 3D shape given an observation from an arbitrary view. We do so by reformulating view consistency using a differentiable ray consistency (DRC) term. We show that this formulation can be incorporated in a learning framework to leverage different types of multi-view observations e.g. foreground masks, depth, color images, semantics etc. as supervision for learning single-view 3D prediction. We present empirical analysis of our technique in a controlled setting. We also show that this approach allows us to improve over existing techniques for single-view reconstruction of objects from the PASCAL VOC dataset.

* To appear at CVPR 2017. Project webpage : https://shubhtuls.github.io/drc/
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We investigate conditional adversarial networks as a general-purpose solution to image-to-image translation problems. These networks not only learn the mapping from input image to output image, but also learn a loss function to train this mapping. This makes it possible to apply the same generic approach to problems that traditionally would require very different loss formulations. We demonstrate that this approach is effective at synthesizing photos from label maps, reconstructing objects from edge maps, and colorizing images, among other tasks. Indeed, since the release of the pix2pix software associated with this paper, a large number of internet users (many of them artists) have posted their own experiments with our system, further demonstrating its wide applicability and ease of adoption without the need for parameter tweaking. As a community, we no longer hand-engineer our mapping functions, and this work suggests we can achieve reasonable results without hand-engineering our loss functions either.

* CVPR 2017
* Website: https://phillipi.github.io/pix2pix/
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We present an unsupervised learning framework for the task of monocular depth and camera motion estimation from unstructured video sequences. We achieve this by simultaneously training depth and camera pose estimation networks using the task of view synthesis as the supervisory signal. The networks are thus coupled via the view synthesis objective during training, but can be applied independently at test time. Empirical evaluation on the KITTI dataset demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach: 1) monocular depth performing comparably with supervised methods that use either ground-truth pose or depth for training, and 2) pose estimation performing favorably with established SLAM systems under comparable input settings.

* Accepted to CVPR 2017. Project webpage: https://people.eecs.berkeley.edu/~tinghuiz/projects/SfMLearner/
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Network pruning is widely used for reducing the heavy computational cost of deep models. A typical pruning algorithm is a three-stage pipeline, i.e., training (a large model), pruning and fine-tuning. During pruning, according to a certain criterion, redundant weights are pruned and important weights are kept to best preserve the accuracy. In this work, we make several surprising observations which contradict common beliefs. For all the six state-of-the-art pruning algorithms we examined, fine-tuning a pruned model only gives comparable or even worse performance than training that model with randomly initialized weights. For pruning algorithms which assume a predefined target network architecture, one can get rid of the full pipeline and directly train the target network from scratch. Our observations are consistent for a wide variety of pruning algorithms with multiple network architectures, datasets, and tasks. Our results have several implications: 1) training a large, over-parameterized model is not necessary to obtain an efficient final model, 2) learned "important" weights of the large model are not necessarily useful for the small pruned model, 3) the pruned architecture itself, rather than a set of inherited "important" weights, is what leads to the efficiency benefit in the final model, which suggests that some pruning algorithms could be seen as performing network architecture search.

* Submitted to ICLR 2019
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The view synthesis problem--generating novel views of a scene from known imagery--has garnered recent attention due in part to compelling applications in virtual and augmented reality. In this paper, we explore an intriguing scenario for view synthesis: extrapolating views from imagery captured by narrow-baseline stereo cameras, including VR cameras and now-widespread dual-lens camera phones. We call this problem stereo magnification, and propose a learning framework that leverages a new layered representation that we call multiplane images (MPIs). Our method also uses a massive new data source for learning view extrapolation: online videos on YouTube. Using data mined from such videos, we train a deep network that predicts an MPI from an input stereo image pair. This inferred MPI can then be used to synthesize a range of novel views of the scene, including views that extrapolate significantly beyond the input baseline. We show that our method compares favorably with several recent view synthesis methods, and demonstrate applications in magnifying narrow-baseline stereo images.

* Accepted to SIGGRAPH 2018. Project webpage: https://people.eecs.berkeley.edu/~tinghuiz/projects/mpi/
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We address the problem of novel view synthesis: given an input image, synthesizing new images of the same object or scene observed from arbitrary viewpoints. We approach this as a learning task but, critically, instead of learning to synthesize pixels from scratch, we learn to copy them from the input image. Our approach exploits the observation that the visual appearance of different views of the same instance is highly correlated, and such correlation could be explicitly learned by training a convolutional neural network (CNN) to predict appearance flows -- 2-D coordinate vectors specifying which pixels in the input view could be used to reconstruct the target view. Furthermore, the proposed framework easily generalizes to multiple input views by learning how to optimally combine single-view predictions. We show that for both objects and scenes, our approach is able to synthesize novel views of higher perceptual quality than previous CNN-based techniques.

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Discriminative deep learning approaches have shown impressive results for problems where human-labeled ground truth is plentiful, but what about tasks where labels are difficult or impossible to obtain? This paper tackles one such problem: establishing dense visual correspondence across different object instances. For this task, although we do not know what the ground-truth is, we know it should be consistent across instances of that category. We exploit this consistency as a supervisory signal to train a convolutional neural network to predict cross-instance correspondences between pairs of images depicting objects of the same category. For each pair of training images we find an appropriate 3D CAD model and render two synthetic views to link in with the pair, establishing a correspondence flow 4-cycle. We use ground-truth synthetic-to-synthetic correspondences, provided by the rendering engine, to train a ConvNet to predict synthetic-to-real, real-to-real and real-to-synthetic correspondences that are cycle-consistent with the ground-truth. At test time, no CAD models are required. We demonstrate that our end-to-end trained ConvNet supervised by cycle-consistency outperforms state-of-the-art pairwise matching methods in correspondence-related tasks.

* To appear in CVPR 2016 (oral presentation)
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