Research papers and code for "Unmesh Kurup":
With recent advances in learning algorithms and hardware development, autonomous cars have shown promise when operating in structured environments under good driving conditions. However, for complex, cluttered and unseen environments with high uncertainty, autonomous driving systems still frequently demonstrate erroneous or unexpected behaviors, that could lead to catastrophic outcomes. Autonomous vehicles should ideally adapt to driving conditions; while this can be achieved through multiple routes, it would be beneficial as a first step to be able to characterize Driveability in some quantified form. To this end, this paper aims to create a framework for investigating different factors that can impact driveability. Also, one of the main mechanisms to adapt autonomous driving systems to any driving condition is to be able to learn and generalize from representative scenarios. The machine learning algorithms that currently do so learn predominantly in a supervised manner and consequently need sufficient data for robust and efficient learning. Therefore, we also perform a comparative overview of 45 public driving datasets that enable learning and publish this dataset index at https://sites.google.com/view/driveability-survey-datasets. Specifically, we categorize the datasets according to use cases, and highlight the datasets that capture complicated and hazardous driving conditions which can be better used for training robust driving models. Furthermore, by discussions of what driving scenarios are not covered by existing public datasets and what driveability factors need more investigation and data acquisition, this paper aims to encourage both targeted dataset collection and the proposal of novel driveability metrics that enhance the robustness of autonomous cars in adverse environments.

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Deep neural networks provide best-in-class performance for a number of computer vision problems. However, training these networks is computationally intensive and requires fine-tuning various hyperparameters. In addition, performance swings widely as the network converges making it hard to decide when to stop training. In this paper, we introduce a trio of techniques (PSWA, PWALKS, and PSWM) centered around periodic sampling of model weights that provide consistent and more robust convergence on a variety of vision problems (classification, detection, segmentation) and gradient update methods (vanilla SGD, Momentum, Adam) with marginal additional computation time. Our techniques use existing optimal training policies but converge in a less volatile fashion with performance improvements that are approximately monotonic. Our analysis of the loss surface shows that these techniques also produce minima that are deeper and wider than those found by SGD.

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Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) have become increasingly popular in computer vision, natural language processing, and other areas. However, training and fine-tuning a deep learning model is computationally intensive and time-consuming. We propose a new method to improve the performance of nearly every model including pre-trained models. The proposed method uses an ensemble approach where the networks in the ensemble are constructed by reassigning model parameter values based on the probabilistic distribution of these parameters, calculated towards the end of the training process. For pre-trained models, this approach results in an additional training step (usually less than one epoch). We perform a variety of analysis using the MNIST dataset and validate the approach with a number of DNN models using pre-trained models on the ImageNet dataset.

* Accepted at UAI Workshop on Uncertainty in Deep Learning
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Deep learning has shown promising results on many machine learning tasks but DL models are often complex networks with large number of neurons and layers, and recently, complex layer structures known as building blocks. Finding the best deep model requires a combination of finding both the right architecture and the correct set of parameters appropriate for that architecture. In addition, this complexity (in terms of layer types, number of neurons, and number of layers) also present problems with generalization since larger networks are easier to overfit to the data. In this paper, we propose a search framework for finding effective architectural building blocks for convolutional neural networks (CNN). Our approach is much faster at finding models that are close to state-of-the-art in performance. In addition, the models discovered by our approach are also smaller than models discovered by similar techniques. We achieve these twin advantages by designing our search space in such a way that it searches over a reduced set of state-of-the-art building blocks for CNNs including residual block, inception block, inception-residual block, ResNeXt block and many others. We apply this technique to generate models for multiple image datasets and show that these models achieve performance comparable to state-of-the-art (and even surpassing the state-of-the-art in one case). We also show that learned models are transferable between datasets.

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