Research papers and code for "Yiqiang Chen":
Deep unsupervised domain adaptation (UDA) has recently received increasing attention from researchers. However, existing methods are computationally intensive due to the computation cost of Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) adopted by most work. To date, there is no effective network compression method for accelerating these models. In this paper, we propose a unified Transfer Channel Pruning (TCP) approach for accelerating UDA models. TCP is capable of compressing the deep UDA model by pruning less important channels while simultaneously learning transferable features by reducing the cross-domain distribution divergence. Therefore, it reduces the impact of negative transfer and maintains competitive performance on the target task. To the best of our knowledge, TCP is the first approach that aims at accelerating deep UDA models. TCP is validated on two benchmark datasets-Office-31 and ImageCLEF-DA with two common backbone networks-VGG16 and ResNet50. Experimental results demonstrate that TCP achieves comparable or better classification accuracy than other comparison methods while significantly reducing the computational cost. To be more specific, in VGG16, we get even higher accuracy after pruning 26% floating point operations (FLOPs); in ResNet50, we also get higher accuracy on half of the tasks after pruning 12% FLOPs. We hope that TCP will open a new door for future research on accelerating transfer learning models.

* Accepted by International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN) 2019; 8 pages
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Human activity recognition aims to recognize the activities of daily living by utilizing the sensors on different body parts. However, when the labeled data from a certain body position (i.e. target domain) is missing, how to leverage the data from other positions (i.e. source domain) to help learn the activity labels of this position? When there are several source domains available, it is often difficult to select the most similar source domain to the target domain. With the selected source domain, we need to perform accurate knowledge transfer between domains. Existing methods only learn the global distance between domains while ignoring the local property. In this paper, we propose a \textit{Stratified Transfer Learning} (STL) framework to perform both source domain selection and knowledge transfer. STL is based on our proposed \textit{Stratified} distance to capture the local property of domains. STL consists of two components: Stratified Domain Selection (STL-SDS) can select the most similar source domain to the target domain; Stratified Activity Transfer (STL-SAT) is able to perform accurate knowledge transfer. Extensive experiments on three public activity recognition datasets demonstrate the superiority of STL. Furthermore, we extensively investigate the performance of transfer learning across different degrees of similarities and activity levels between domains. We also discuss the potential applications of STL in other fields of pervasive computing for future research.

* An extension of our PerCom 18 paper arXiv:1801.00820; submit to PMC journal (Pervasive and Mobile Computing); 22 pages
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Human activity recognition plays an important role in people's daily life. However, it is often expensive and time-consuming to acquire sufficient labeled activity data. To solve this problem, transfer learning leverages the labeled samples from the source domain to annotate the target domain which has few or none labels. Unfortunately, when there are several source domains available, it is difficult to select the right source domains for transfer. The right source domain means that it has the most similar properties with the target domain, thus their similarity is higher, which can facilitate transfer learning. Choosing the right source domain helps the algorithm perform well and prevents the negative transfer. In this paper, we propose an effective Unsupervised Source Selection algorithm for Activity Recognition (USSAR). USSAR is able to select the most similar $K$ source domains from a list of available domains. After this, we propose an effective Transfer Neural Network to perform knowledge transfer for Activity Recognition (TNNAR). TNNAR could capture both the time and spatial relationship between activities while transferring knowledge. Experiments on three public activity recognition datasets demonstrate that: 1) The USSAR algorithm is effective in selecting the best source domains. 2) The TNNAR method can reach high accuracy when performing activity knowledge transfer.

* ICCSE 2018 best paper; 8 pages
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Falls are one of the important causes of accidental or unintentional injury death worldwide. Therefore, this paper presents a reliable fall detection algorithm and a mobile cloud collaboration system for fall detection. The algorithm is an ensemble learning method based on decision tree, named Falldetection Ensemble Decision Tree (FEDT). The mobile cloud collaboration system can be divided into three stages: 1) mobile stage: use a light-weighted threshold method to filter out the activities of daily livings (ADLs), 2) collaboration stage: transmit data to cloud and meanwhile extract features in the cloud, 3) cloud stage: deploy the model trained by FEDT to give the final detection result with the extracted features. Experiments show that the performance of the proposed FEDT outperforms the others' over 1-3% both on sensitivity and specificity, and more importantly, the system can provide reliable fall detection in practical scenario.

* 7 pages
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Transfer learning aims at transferring knowledge from a well-labeled domain to a similar but different domain with limited or no labels. Unfortunately, existing learning-based methods often involve intensive model selection and hyperparameter tuning to obtain good results. Moreover, cross-validation is not possible for tuning hyperparameters since there are often no labels in the target domain. This would restrict wide applicability of transfer learning especially in computationally-constraint devices such as wearables. In this paper, we propose a practically Easy Transfer Learning (EasyTL) approach which requires no model selection and hyperparameter tuning, while achieving competitive performance. By exploiting intra-domain structures, EasyTL is able to learn both non-parametric transfer features and classifiers. Extensive experiments demonstrate that, compared to state-of-the-art traditional and deep methods, EasyTL satisfies the Occam's Razor principle: it is extremely easy to implement and use while achieving comparable or better performance in classification accuracy and much better computational efficiency. Additionally, it is shown that EasyTL can increase the performance of existing transfer feature learning methods.

* Camera-ready version of IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME) 2019; code available at http://transferlearning.xyz/code/traditional/EasyTL
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Transfer learning has achieved promising results by leveraging knowledge from the source domain to annotate the target domain which has few or none labels. Existing methods often seek to minimize the distribution divergence between domains, such as the marginal distribution, the conditional distribution or both. However, these two distances are often treated equally in existing algorithms, which will result in poor performance in real applications. Moreover, existing methods usually assume that the dataset is balanced, which also limits their performances on imbalanced tasks that are quite common in real problems. To tackle the distribution adaptation problem, in this paper, we propose a novel transfer learning approach, named as Balanced Distribution \underline{A}daptation~(BDA), which can adaptively leverage the importance of the marginal and conditional distribution discrepancies, and several existing methods can be treated as special cases of BDA. Based on BDA, we also propose a novel Weighted Balanced Distribution Adaptation~(W-BDA) algorithm to tackle the class imbalance issue in transfer learning. W-BDA not only considers the distribution adaptation between domains but also adaptively changes the weight of each class. To evaluate the proposed methods, we conduct extensive experiments on several transfer learning tasks, which demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithms over several state-of-the-art methods.

* ICDM 2017
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Sensor-based activity recognition seeks the profound high-level knowledge about human activities from multitudes of low-level sensor readings. Conventional pattern recognition approaches have made tremendous progress in the past years. However, those methods often heavily rely on heuristic hand-crafted feature extraction, which could hinder their generalization performance. Additionally, existing methods are undermined for unsupervised and incremental learning tasks. Recently, the recent advancement of deep learning makes it possible to perform automatic high-level feature extraction thus achieves promising performance in many areas. Since then, deep learning based methods have been widely adopted for the sensor-based activity recognition tasks. This paper surveys the recent advance of deep learning based sensor-based activity recognition. We summarize existing literature from three aspects: sensor modality, deep model, and application. We also present detailed insights on existing work and propose grand challenges for future research.

* 10 pages, 2 figures, and 5 tables; submitted to Pattern Recognition Letters (second revision)
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In activity recognition, it is often expensive and time-consuming to acquire sufficient activity labels. To solve this problem, transfer learning leverages the labeled samples from the source domain to annotate the target domain which has few or none labels. Existing approaches typically consider learning a global domain shift while ignoring the intra-affinity between classes, which will hinder the performance of the algorithms. In this paper, we propose a novel and general cross-domain learning framework that can exploit the intra-affinity of classes to perform intra-class knowledge transfer. The proposed framework, referred to as Stratified Transfer Learning (STL), can dramatically improve the classification accuracy for cross-domain activity recognition. Specifically, STL first obtains pseudo labels for the target domain via majority voting technique. Then, it performs intra-class knowledge transfer iteratively to transform both domains into the same subspaces. Finally, the labels of target domain are obtained via the second annotation. To evaluate the performance of STL, we conduct comprehensive experiments on three large public activity recognition datasets~(i.e. OPPORTUNITY, PAMAP2, and UCI DSADS), which demonstrates that STL significantly outperforms other state-of-the-art methods w.r.t. classification accuracy (improvement of 7.68%). Furthermore, we extensively investigate the performance of STL across different degrees of similarities and activity levels between domains. And we also discuss the potential of STL in other pervasive computing applications to provide empirical experience for future research.

* 10 pages; accepted by IEEE PerCom 2018; full paper. (camera-ready version)
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Visual domain adaptation aims to learn robust classifiers for the target domain by leveraging knowledge from a source domain. Existing methods either attempt to align the cross-domain distributions, or perform manifold subspace learning. However, there are two significant challenges: (1) degenerated feature transformation, which means that distribution alignment is often performed in the original feature space, where feature distortions are hard to overcome. On the other hand, subspace learning is not sufficient to reduce the distribution divergence. (2) unevaluated distribution alignment, which means that existing distribution alignment methods only align the marginal and conditional distributions with equal importance, while they fail to evaluate the different importance of these two distributions in real applications. In this paper, we propose a Manifold Embedded Distribution Alignment (MEDA) approach to address these challenges. MEDA learns a domain-invariant classifier in Grassmann manifold with structural risk minimization, while performing dynamic distribution alignment to quantitatively account for the relative importance of marginal and conditional distributions. To the best of our knowledge, MEDA is the first attempt to perform dynamic distribution alignment for manifold domain adaptation. Extensive experiments demonstrate that MEDA shows significant improvements in classification accuracy compared to state-of-the-art traditional and deep methods.

* ACM Multimedia conference 2018 (ACM MM) ORAL paper; top 10 papers; 9 pages; code available at http://transferlearning.xyz
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