Top papers that people are talking about right now
How does the machine classify styles in art? And how does it relate to art historians' methods for analyzing style? Several studies have shown the ability of the machine to learn and predict style categories, such as Renaissance, Baroque, Impressionism, etc., from images of paintings. This implies that the machine can learn an internal representation encoding discriminative features through its visual analysis. However, such a representation is not necessarily interpretable. We conducted a comprehensive study of several of the state-of-the-art convolutional neural networks applied to the task of style classification on 77K images of paintings, and analyzed the learned representation through correlation analysis with concepts derived from art history. Surprisingly, the networks could place the works of art in a smooth temporal arrangement mainly based on learning style labels, without any a priori knowledge of time of creation, the historical time and context of styles, or relations between styles. The learned representations showed that there are few underlying factors that explain the visual variations of style in art. Some of these factors were found to correlate with style patterns suggested by Heinrich W\"olfflin (1846-1945). The learned representations also consistently highlighted certain artists as the extreme distinctive representative of their styles, which quantitatively confirms art historian observations. Click to Read Paper
Study of urban form is an important area of research in urban planning/design that contributes to our understanding of how cities function and evolve. However, classical approaches are based on very limited observations and inconsistent methods. As an alternative, availability of massive urban data collections such as Open Street Map from the one hand and the recent advancements in machine learning methods such as deep learning techniques on the other have opened up new possibilities to automatically investigate urban forms at the global scale. In this work for the first time, by collecting a large data set of street networks in more than one million cities, towns and villages all over the world, we trained a deep convolutional auto-encoder, that automatically learns the hierarchical structures of urban forms and represents them via dense and comparable vectors. We showed how the learned urban vectors could be used for different investigations. Using the learned urban vectors, one is able to easily find and compare similar urban forms all over the world, considering their overall spatial structure and other factors such as orientation, graphical structure, and density and partial deformations. Further cluster analysis reveals the distribution of the main patterns of urban forms all over the planet. Click to Read Paper
Unsupervised learning of syntactic structure is typically performed using generative models with discrete latent variables and multinomial parameters. In most cases, these models have not leveraged continuous word representations. In this work, we propose a novel generative model that jointly learns discrete syntactic structure and continuous word representations in an unsupervised fashion by cascading an invertible neural network with a structured generative prior. We show that the invertibility condition allows for efficient exact inference and marginal likelihood computation in our model so long as the prior is well-behaved. In experiments we instantiate our approach with both Markov and tree-structured priors, evaluating on two tasks: part-of-speech (POS) induction, and unsupervised dependency parsing without gold POS annotation. On the Penn Treebank, our Markov-structured model surpasses state-of-the-art results on POS induction. Similarly, we find that our tree-structured model achieves state-of-the-art performance on unsupervised dependency parsing for the difficult training condition where neither gold POS annotation nor punctuation-based constraints are available. Click to Read Paper
Current state-of-the-art machine translation systems are based on encoder-decoder architectures, that first encode the input sequence, and then generate an output sequence based on the input encoding. Both are interfaced with an attention mechanism that recombines a fixed encoding of the source tokens based on the decoder state. We propose an alternative approach which instead relies on a single 2D convolutional neural network across both sequences. Each layer of our network re-codes source tokens on the basis of the output sequence produced so far. Attention-like properties are therefore pervasive throughout the network. Our model yields excellent results, outperforming state-of-the-art encoder-decoder systems, while being conceptually simpler and having fewer parameters. Click to Read Paper
Targeted socioeconomic policies require an accurate understanding of a country's demographic makeup. To that end, the United States spends more than 1 billion dollars a year gathering census data such as race, gender, education, occupation and unemployment rates. Compared to the traditional method of collecting surveys across many years which is costly and labor intensive, data-driven, machine learning driven approaches are cheaper and faster--with the potential ability to detect trends in close to real time. In this work, we leverage the ubiquity of Google Street View images and develop a computer vision pipeline to predict income, per capita carbon emission, crime rates and other city attributes from a single source of publicly available visual data. We first detect cars in 50 million images across 200 of the largest US cities and train a model to predict demographic attributes using the detected cars. To facilitate our work, we have collected the largest and most challenging fine-grained dataset reported to date consisting of over 2600 classes of cars comprised of images from Google Street View and other web sources, classified by car experts to account for even the most subtle of visual differences. We use this data to construct the largest scale fine-grained detection system reported to date. Our prediction results correlate well with ground truth income data (r=0.82), Massachusetts department of vehicle registration, and sources investigating crime rates, income segregation, per capita carbon emission, and other market research. Finally, we learn interesting relationships between cars and neighborhoods allowing us to perform the first large scale sociological analysis of cities using computer vision techniques. Click to Read Paper
Importance sampling is one of the most widely used variance reduction strategies in Monte Carlo rendering. In this paper, we propose a novel importance sampling technique that uses a neural network to learn how to sample from a desired density represented by a set of samples. Our approach considers an existing Monte Carlo rendering algorithm as a black box. During a scene-dependent training phase, we learn to generate samples with a desired density in the primary sample space of the rendering algorithm using maximum likelihood estimation. We leverage a recent neural network architecture that was designed to represent real-valued non-volume preserving ('Real NVP') transformations in high dimensional spaces. We use Real NVP to non-linearly warp primary sample space and obtain desired densities. In addition, Real NVP efficiently computes the determinant of the Jacobian of the warp, which is required to implement the change of integration variables implied by the warp. A main advantage of our approach is that it is agnostic of underlying light transport effects, and can be combined with many existing rendering techniques by treating them as a black box. We show that our approach leads to effective variance reduction in several practical scenarios. Click to Read Paper
We introduce a simple algorithm, True Asymptotic Natural Gradient Optimization (TANGO), that converges to a true natural gradient descent in the limit of small learning rates, without explicit Fisher matrix estimation. For quadratic models the algorithm is also an instance of averaged stochastic gradient, where the parameter is a moving average of a "fast", constant-rate gradient descent. TANGO appears as a particular de-linearization of averaged SGD, and is sometimes quite different on non-quadratic models. This further connects averaged SGD and natural gradient, both of which are arguably optimal asymptotically. In large dimension, small learning rates will be required to approximate the natural gradient well. Still, this shows it is possible to get arbitrarily close to exact natural gradient descent with a lightweight algorithm. Click to Read Paper
Many well-established recommender systems are based on representation learning in Euclidean space. In these models, matching functions such as the Euclidean distance or inner product are typically used for computing similarity scores between user and item embeddings. This paper investigates the notion of learning user and item representations in Hyperbolic space. In this paper, we argue that Hyperbolic space is more suitable for learning user-item embeddings in the recommendation domain. Unlike Euclidean spaces, Hyperbolic spaces are intrinsically equipped to handle hierarchical structure, encouraged by its property of exponentially increasing distances away from origin. We propose HyperBPR (Hyperbolic Bayesian Personalized Ranking), a conceptually simple but highly effective model for the task at hand. Our proposed HyperBPR not only outperforms their Euclidean counterparts, but also achieves state-of-the-art performance on multiple benchmark datasets, demonstrating the effectiveness of personalized recommendation in Hyperbolic space. Click to Read Paper
Recently, the introduction of the generative adversarial network (GAN) and its variants has enabled the generation of realistic synthetic samples, which has been used for enlarging training sets. Previous work primarily focused on data augmentation for semi-supervised and supervised tasks. In this paper, we instead focus on unsupervised anomaly detection and propose a novel generative data augmentation framework optimized for this task. In particular, we propose to oversample infrequent normal samples - normal samples that occur with small probability, e.g., rare normal events. We show that these samples are responsible for false positives in anomaly detection. However, oversampling of infrequent normal samples is challenging for real-world high-dimensional data with multimodal distributions. To address this challenge, we propose to use a GAN variant known as the adversarial autoencoder (AAE) to transform the high-dimensional multimodal data distributions into low-dimensional unimodal latent distributions with well-defined tail probability. Then, we systematically oversample at the `edge' of the latent distributions to increase the density of infrequent normal samples. We show that our oversampling pipeline is a unified one: it is generally applicable to datasets with different complex data distributions. To the best of our knowledge, our method is the first data augmentation technique focused on improving performance in unsupervised anomaly detection. We validate our method by demonstrating consistent improvements across several real-world datasets. Click to Read Paper
We propose a unified framework for building unsupervised representations of individual objects or entities (and their compositions), by associating with each object both a distributional as well as a point estimate (vector embedding). This is made possible by the use of optimal transport, which allows us to build these associated estimates while harnessing the underlying geometry of the ground space. Our method gives a novel perspective for building rich and powerful feature representations that simultaneously capture uncertainty (via a distributional estimate) and interpretability (with the optimal transport map). As a guiding example, we formulate unsupervised representations for text, in particular for sentence representation and entailment detection. Empirical results show strong advantages gained through the proposed framework. This approach can be used for any unsupervised or supervised problem (on text or other modalities) with a co-occurrence structure, such as any sequence data. The key tools underlying the framework are Wasserstein distances and Wasserstein barycenters (and, hence the title!). Click to Read Paper